Research / Projects

Seeing what is there - Doxology as Theory of Knowledge for the Humanities and the Social Sciences

(For an introduction to the idea of doxology as a rhetorical theory of knowing – please see go to my personal profile by clicking on my name, just to the right)

In the late 19th century in northern Spain and southern France prehistoric mural paintings and engravings were discovered. Seeing what is there - Doxology as Theory of Knowledge for the Humanities and the Social Sciences inquired into epistemic questions related to images, depicting and perception that this rich and much debated material has given rise to. Focusing respectively on the historical and scientific circumstances and controversies and on the epistemic and perceptual problems and questions the discovery of these paintings and engravings gave rise to, the project attempted to outline of the doxa of cave art studies. It criticized the different attempts to interpret the cave art and suggested, with the help of both Cornelius Castoriadis's concept of technique and Ernst Cassirer's notion of symbolic form, a yet untried way out of the hermeneutical impasse where the interpretation of the paleolithic pictures finds itself today.

The project was presented in many public lectures, in presentations at different seminars both in Sweden and in France and USA, as well as in several publications, both in Swedish and English, between 2006 - 2011. The project was completed in and through the book Cave Art, Perception, Knowledge, Palgrave Macmillan, London 2012

Status

Finished

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Project start: 2009
Project end: 2013

Financier: Östersjöstiftelsen

Research linked to the Baltic Sea region and Eastern Europe: No

Information på svenska

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