Our research

Books in the librarySödertörn University has professional, creative research environments that range over many disciplines and fields.

Our research has a contemporary focus united with an active and critical approach to the past. Many of the research groups and research projects strive to achieve a high level of contemporary and social relevance. The university's research generally has an international focus, even in subjects that traditionally examine their own national cultures and history. A key word is multidisciplinarity.

Publications

Publications from the DiVA publications database are listed here on an ongoing basis.

The 50 most recent publications registered in DiVA, the publication database used by the university, are listed below. Do you want to search among all the publications linked to the university? Go to DiVA.

You can also go to the tabs for Researchers, Projects, Subjects or Centres and find publications linked to the relevant unit.

Publications

In: Handbook of Sustainability Science and Research. : Springer, 2018. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ranjula Bali Swain

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Economics

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nordicom Review 2017, 38 (1): 133-135.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Revista Chilena de Derecho y Ciencia Política 2017, 8 (1): 83-117.

Historically, indigenous peoples have been marginalized and oppressed in the Bolivian political economy. During the presidency of Evo Morales, and under the 2009 Constitution, political, economic, social and cultural decolonization has become the central project for the transformation of the State and society. On the one hand, the new Constitution has been classified as one of the most progressive in the world with respect to ethnically defined rights; the indigenous ethical-philosophical principles of Suma Qamaña/Vivir Bien, referring to the harmonious relationship between individuals and nature, have been incorporated into the Constitution. On the other hand, these rights collide with broader social rights (defined by class) and also the rights of the State to extract and market natural resources (especially hydrocarbon extraction and mining) under the banner of redistributive justice, social reforms and the common good. This collision is defined in this study as the paradox of extractivist developmentalism. The article is based on an ethnographic work and problematizes the extractivist dilemma and the tensions between ethnic rights and class rights, thus contributing to debates about indigeneity and the challenges and dilemmas of decolonizing projects.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rickard Lalander

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental StudiesPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: . : .

Right to be Forgotten in Sweden Google has received about 15,000 requests for delisting regarding Swedish websites. Yet, in more than half of the cases the American search engine operator refused to remove the disputed websites from their results.What kind of help may individuals to whom a request for delisting has been denied expect from public authorities expect from public authorities? In other words, how do the Swedish authorities apply the Google ruling? These are the questions we tackle in this paper, first by focusing on the manner in which the Data Protection Authority, the Datainspektion (DI), deals with the issue; then by looking on how the courts – in the current case, the ordinary judge – handle complaints against search engine operators’ decisions not to delist incriminated URLs.The first section, dedicated to the theme of the right to be delisted and the data protection authority, begins with a brief review of the information provided by the Data Protection Authority’s website on the right to be forgotten and the manner to exercise it. We notice that there is a need for clearer information but that some improvements seem to be underway, not least concerning the right to erasure laid down in the General Data Protection Regulation.The next two parts of Section 1 deal with the twofold procedure initiated in May 2015 by the DI towards Google, following complaints submitted to the Swedish authority. One part of the procedure concerns thirteen individual complaints selected by the DI that the Swedish supervisory authority required Google to review. The second part of the procedure consists of a general investigation of the way the American search engine operator complies with the European case law on the right to be forgotten. In a decision closing these two procedures on May 2nd 2017, the Data Protection Authority, assesses that in five of these cases Google’s reiterated refusal to delist websites from the search results were in breach of the Swedish data protection legislation and requires Google to delist the incriminated websites by August 2nd 2017. Moreover, the Swedish Data Protection Authority makes two recommendations to Google with regard to the procedure its removals-team follows when receiving a request from an individual to remove links. Additionally the DI requires Google to apply the right to be forgotten not only for search results on Google’s Swedish pages, but also on Google’s search engine for other countries that ”have such a relationship to Sweden and to the data subject that they cause an infringement in the privacy of the data subject”. The American search engine operator has three weeks from the date of reception of the decision for lodging an appeal to the administrative court.The second section, entitled The right to be delisted and the ordinary judge, provides an analysis of the first Swedish judgment in the field. The court of first instance of Stockholm, in its decision from May 9th 2016, made upon the appeal of a businessman in the construction sector complaining about the refusal of Google to remove links to webpages publishing critical articles regarding the plaintiff, decided in favor of the search engine operator. We analyse this judgement with a particular focus, first, on the balancing of the interests the judge makes in the present case, as well as on the legality of the data processing, and, second, on the question raised by the defendant on the competence of the ordinary judge to prohibit the continued processing of data. On the first issue, the Swedish authority, taking inter alia into account the role of public figure of the plaintiff and the seriousness of the news outlets which published the incriminated articles, concluded that the interests of Google and third persons to diffuse and access information contained in the articles outweight the right to protection of privacy and the right of data protection of the plaintiff. Consequently, the judge assessed that the data processing wasn’t illegal. On the second issue of the competence of the ordinary judge to order the cessation of the listing of websites, we first review the different opinions on that issue before raising the question of the compliance of the Swedish legal framework in terms of the effectiveness of the application of the European ruling on the right to be delisted.Our general conclusion is that it is too early to give a straightforward appreciation on the way the Swedish authorities apply the right to be forgotten. Indeed, we don’t know how the legally robust decision taken by the DI in May 2017 will impact its policy in the field of the right to be forgotten; will the DI, for instance, endorse more individuals’ complaints? Furthermore, to this date, there has been no decision on the right to be forgotten by the administrative court and only one by an ordinary court. In any case, the absence of obligation for the Datainspektion to forward individual complaints to search engine operators, if combined with a lack of power for the ordinary judge to order a delisting, would raise questions on the effectivness in Sweden of the application of the right to be forgotten.  

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Patricia Jonason

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Public Law

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space 2017, : -.

Responding to calls for a more theoretically driven, post-positivist and radical marine spatial planning research that approaches the policy as a political project, this paper develops a poststructuralist discourse theory approach to critical marine spatial planning. Elaborating radical contingency as an ontological condition of social life, which points to the ineradicability of power and conflict in marine spatial planning social relations, the paper problematizes marine spatial planning as constituting politics, or key practices that attempt to organize human coexistence and thus, conceal this radical contingency. These practices (e.g. ecosystem-based management, participation, planning regulation and the organization of socio-natural spaces), whose outcomes are far from adaptive, consensual or neutral are discussed as sites of ‘politics’ that effectively marginalize particular groups of people and ‘herd’ their participation and ways of knowing toward achieving limited policy outcomes. Drawing on the EU Marine Spatial Planning Directive, the paper further teases out how specific narratives and rhetorical signifiers around ‘integrating’ and ‘balancing’ potentially irreconcilable sustainable development objectives may interpellate particular stakeholders in ways that render them ideologically complicitous in sustaining, rather than challenging, neoliberal logics of managerialism and economic maximization of marine resources. But in tune with the ontological condition of the social as radically contingent, the paper discusses how and why participatory spaces may constitute a potential space of contestation for marginalized voices and thus, reveal the political moment of marine spatial planning. Calls are made for future empirically grounded research that explores how these marine spatial planning practices are lived in both planning and extra-planning settings, and with what implications for marine protection and extant social relations of power in different marine spatial planning contexts.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ralph Tafon

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: CHI'17 Workshop positioning paper – Open Design at the Intersection between Making and Manufacturing. : .

Making is ubiquitous. We all make things. Or maybe we don’t. But we could. The equipment is there, the tools and the skills can be learned. The expertise and the spaces shared. However, despite popularly stated, not everyone is a maker. Who gets to participate in making and what sites and voices are excluded? This short paper provokes questions on the interest in making, the continuous notion of empowerment and demands to #failharder.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sophie Landwehr Sydow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

This paper analyses a series of events in which a discarded box found in a garbage room is examined and taken apart in the context of a makerspace. The participants' inquiry provided a rich and multifaceted experience in various settings, including puzzle-solving, exploring physical and digital materials, engaging people with different skills. The social engagements with and around the artifacts brought certain interpretative aspects to the fore. Situated acts of interpretation worked as ways of building a coherent narrative and a meaningful experience. In the paper, we highlight the relationship between on the one hand the subjects' skills and motivations to understand and make sense of the technology at hand which we call material literacy, and on the other hand the specific material qualities that encourage or trigger certain interpretations and experiences. The qualities we discuss are: opacity, risk, authenticity, uniqueness, age, and hybridity. This study allows us to reposition the contemporary understanding of makerspaces beyond that of being places for innovation and learning.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jakob Tholander

Martin JonssonSophie Landwehr Sydow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: På väg. Lund : Arkiv förlag & tidskrift, 2017. 229-239.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lisa KingsZhanna Kravchenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Social WorkSociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Baltic Worlds 2017, X (1-2): 100-110.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Organisation & Samhälle 2017, 1 : 28-33.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Svensson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

Academy of Public AdministrationSchool of Social Sciences

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Lund : Studentlitteratur AB, 2017.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Bengt JacobssonJenny Svensson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

Academy of Public AdministrationSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

-

The International Journal of Cultural Policy 2017, 23 (5): 655-657.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Svensson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

Academy of Public AdministrationSchool of Social Sciences

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Qualitative research in organization and management 2017, 12 (2): 149-168.

Purpose: Policy change is frequently framed as resulting from governmental strategy based on explicit preferences, rational decision making and consecutive and aligned implementation. The purpose of this paper is to explore the theoretical perspective of institutional work as an alternative approach to understanding policy change, and investigates the construction of resources needed to perform such work.Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a case study of the process wherein the idea of cultural and creative industries was introduced into Lithuanian cultural policy. The main data generating methods are document studies and qualitative interviews.Findings: The analysis demonstrates the ways in which the resources needed to perform institutional work are created through the enactment of practice, and through the application of resourcing techniques. Three such techniques are identified in the empirical material: the application of experiences from other fields of practice, the elicitation of external support, and the borrowing of legitimacy.Originality/value: The study offers an alternative approach to studies of policy change by demonstrating the value of institutional work in such change. Further, it contributes to the literature on institutional work by highlighting how instances of such work, drawing on a distributed agency, interlink and connect to each other in a process to produce policy change. Finally, it proposes three interrelated resourcing techniques underlying institutional work.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Egle Rindzeviciute

Jenny Svensson

Klara Tomson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

Academy of Public AdministrationSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

It has been suggested that regionalism is defined “as an economic process whereby economic flows grow more rapidly among a given group of states [in the same region] than between these states and those located elsewhere”. In this paper we approach the economic underpinnings for the Baltic Sea Region by analysing the developments with regard to trade and investment in the quarter of a century that has passed since the fall of the communist regimes that divided the European continent At the same time we look into the political developments that brought the 2009 adoption of the European Union’s first macroregional strategy, the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. The strategy was a symbolic second milestone with regard to the political endeavours to reintegrate the continent; the first being the 2004 enlargement. Having transformed the Baltic Sea from a ‘Mare Dividum’ to a European ‘Mare Nostrum’ was indeed also a sign of the success of such integrative political processes.However, it may also be argued that the perceived need for a specific strategy in order to further and deepen the integration and reduce the economic gaps within the European Union gives an indication that there was more to be wished for with regard to this region. Further, more recent political developments in Europe as such as well as the constituent countries of this macroregion has cast some doubts on the future. In this paper we ask ourselves whether developments with regard to investments and trade are in congruence with the notion of the building of one integrated region; does it make economic sense to talk about a Baltic Sea Region or is the eastwest divide still present? For example, to what extent have the developments with regard to foreign direct investments proved sustainable? What sectors are leading the way and which are lagging? What divisions remain to be tackled? These are some of the questions that this paper attempts to address based upon a thorough analysis of the existing sources with regard to foreign direct investment and trade flows. In addition, in a concluding section, we open up an analysis on whether recent political development risk nullifying the progress made on the economic arena – or whether Brexit and connected developments are actually reinforcing the European macroregional agenda?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mikael Lönnborg

Mikael Olsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

ENTER forumSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michael Rafferty

Mikael Lönnborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

ENTER forumSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Substance Use & Misuse 2017, : 1-8.

BACKGROUND: Inhalant use by children and adolescents has been linked to an increased risk of multiple drug use, mental health problems and antisocial behavior.OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between the frequency of inhalant use and psychiatric diagnoses among incarcerated delinquent youths in Russia.METHODS: A total of 370 incarcerated delinquents from a juvenile correction center in Northern Russia were assessed by means of a semi-structured psychiatric interview and by self-reports.RESULTS: Compared to non-users (N = 266), inhalant users (N = 104) reported higher rates of PTSD, early onset conduct disorder, ADHD, alcohol abuse and dependence, as well as higher levels of antisocial behavior, impulsiveness and more psychopathic traits. Frequent inhalant users also reported the highest rates of co-occurring psychopathology.CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that inhalant use in delinquents is frequent and may require additional clinical measures to address the issue of psychiatric comorbidity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Linnea Zachrison

Andrew Stickley


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ambio 2017, : -.

The forest landscape across the Nordic and Baltic regions hosts numerous lakes and watercourses, which must be included in forest management. In this study, national policy designs regarding protection zones for surface waters on forest land were reviewed and compared for the Nordic countries, Estonia and Latvia. The focus was how each country regulates protection zones, whether they are voluntary or mandatory, and the rationale behind adopting a low or high degree of prescriptiveness. Iceland and Denmark had a low degree of policy prescriptiveness, whereas Norway, Estonia and Latvia had a high degree of prescriptiveness. Sweden and Finland relied to a large extent on voluntary commitments. The prescribed zone widths within the region ranged from 1 m to 5 km. The results indicated that land-use distribution, forest ownership structure and historical and political legacies have influenced the varying degrees of prescriptiveness in the region.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Eva Ring

Johanna Johansson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Public Health 2017, 147 : 157-158.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

R. Reile

Andrew Stickley

Mall Leinsalu

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: CHI EA '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

Movement-based interaction design is increasingly popular, with application domains ranging from dance, sport, gaming to physical rehabilitation. In a workshop at CHI 2016, a set of prominent artists, game designers, and interaction designers embarked on a research journey to explore what we came to refer to as "aesthetics in soma-based design". In this follow-up workshop, we would like to take the next step, shifting from discussing the philosophical underpinnings we draw upon to explain and substantiate our practice, to form our own interaction design theory and conceptualisations. We propose that soma-based design theory needs practical, pragmatic as well as analytical study - otherwise the felt dimension will be missing. We will consider how such tacit knowledge can be articulated, documented and shared. To ground the discussion firmly in the felt experience of our own practice, the workshop is organised as a joint practical design work session, supported by analytical study.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

K. Höök

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nordisk Försäkringstidskrift 2017, 2 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mats Larsson

Mikael Lönnborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

ENTER forumSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

PLoS ONE 2017, 12 (6): -.

In animals, colorful and conspicuous ornaments enhance individual attractiveness to potential mates, but are typically tempered by natural selection for crypsis and predator protection. In species where males compete for females, this can lead to highly ornamented males competing for mating opportunities with choosy females, and vice versa. However, even where males compete for mating opportunities, females may exhibit conspicuous displays. These female displays are often poorly understood and it may be unclear whether they declare mating intent, signal intrasexual aggression or form a target for male mate preference. We examined the function of the conspicuous dark eyes that female sand gobies temporarily display during courtship by experimentally testing if males preferred to associate with females with artificially darkened eyes and if dark eyes are displayed during female aggression. By observing interactions between a male and two females freely associating in an aquarium we also investigated in which context females naturally displayed dark eyes. We found that dark eyes were more likely to be displayed by more gravid females than less gravid females and possibly ahead of spawning, but that males did not respond behaviorally to dark eyes or prefer dark-eyed females. Females behaving aggressively did not display dark eyes. We suggest that dark eyes are not a signal per se but may be an aspect of female mate choice, possibly related to vision.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Karin H Olsson

Ola Svensson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

European Journal of Cultural Studies 2017, 20 (3): 252-270.

The 1960s witnessed the emergence of television as a global medium. One way of demonstrating the powers and possibilities of television was the production and airing of transnational broadcast events. In order to produce these, national broadcast organizations had to engage in joint production of such events. The article examines two such events: Gagarin's return to Moscow after orbiting the earth in April 1961 and the more well-known Our World' broadcast 6 years later. At the time of their production, these broadcasts were seen as crucial moments in television history, as prototypes of what could be expected of television in the future. They also relied on extensive cooperation between broadcast organizations in socialist and Western countries, organizations that to a large extent shared the same production values but also had to negotiate competing visions of the geography of modern communications networks. The broadcasts discussed in this article thus provide the opportunity to reflect upon the shaping of television history and global media memories. Based on case studies of the planning and production of the broadcasts, the article argues that global power relations have shaped the remembered history of television and therefore must be part of our understanding of it.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Christine E. Evans

Lars Lundgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

European Journal of Cultural Studies 2017, 20 (3): 285-306.

The proliferation and recycling of Soviet popular culture and history is a central ingredient of post-Soviet film and television production, leading to accusations that the Russian media is nurturing nostalgia. Nostalgia can hardly account for the manifold uses of the Soviet past in contemporary Russian television programming. Nevertheless, in the aftermath of the Crimean annexation, it became evident that nostalgia for a strong empire with a strong ruling hand' was part of Putin's symbolic politics for several years. Keeping these considerations in mind, this article investigates how nostalgia extends into the domain of television and becomes an element of symbolic politics, employing a case study of two documentaries produced during Putin's presidency to focus the analysis. This study also examines how contemporary Russian television uses footage and film clips from the socialist period and witness testimonies to dismantle' popular myths.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina Kalinina

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Ekonomska Istrazivanja 2017, 30 (1): 1132-1151.

With the large increase in transportation over the last decades and the associated negative impacts upon the environment and society, a more sustainable use of transport is a crucial policy issue. This analysis focuses on road freight transport of selected produce (carrots, cabbage, apples and pears) with the aim to appraise the sustainability of road freight transport of these for the Slovene market. To this end, we take into account self-sufficiency, import and export features, transport needs, produce origin and prices differences between domestic and non-domestic produce. The method used for obtaining transported quantities, exported from and imported to the county, was material flow accounts (MFA). Then we undertook an analysis of sustainability of road transport of produce where we considered the country's transport needs. The study finds that road freight transport for selected produce is not sustainable. Recognising the normative dimensions of sustainability, the role of social marketing in this context is explored and suggestions on how to promote more sustainable transport solutions advanced.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sandra Bonca

Romina Rodela

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Abstracts 13th Annual International Conference on Tourism 29-31 May & 1 June 2017 Athens, Greece. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Erik BorgFrank Michael Kirsch

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

International Political Science Review 2017, : -.

Based on data from a survey conducted in Saint Petersburg in 2013, this article sheds new light on attitudes towards fatherhood in contemporary Russia. We explore what norms are held concerning fatherhood, how these attitudes are related to age, sex, education and income as well as to ideal?typical models established in previous research on fatherhood from Western Europe and the US. Thus, the article also discusses what explanatory value established theoretical models have for the Russian context. Norms of the role of the father in the family are related to general norms of masculinity and, hence, are an important part of the study of politics and the political climate in a society. The results show that there are several fatherhood ideals present in contemporary Northwestern Russia: a traditional breadwinner model, an active fatherhood model as well as what we refer to as a marginalized fatherhood model. The latter has not been substantially identified in previous research, and may tentatively be identified as a legacy of the Soviet era.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johnny Rodin

Joakim EkmanPelle Åberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences 2017, : 1-9.

Aims.: To investigate whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) modify the impact of exposure to a natural disaster (the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami) on the occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among older people. Methods.: Data were collected as part of the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES), which is an on-going epidemiological survey investigating social determinants of health among older people across Japan. Information on PTSD symptoms based on the Screening Questionnaire for Disaster Mental Health, traumatic exposure to the earthquake (i.e., house damage and loss of relatives/friends during the earthquake/tsunami) and ACEs was obtained from 580 participants aged 65 or older living in Iwanuma City, Miyagi Prefecture, which suffered severe damage as a result of the earthquake and the subsequent tsunami in March 2011. Associations were examined using Poisson regression analysis with a robust variance estimator after adjusting for covariates. Results.: The prevalence of PTSD was 9.7% in this population; compared to those with no traumatic experience, the prevalence of PTSD was approximately two times higher among those who experienced the loss of close friends/relatives (PR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.11–3.03, p = 0.018), or whose house was damaged (PR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.07–4.34, p = 0.032). ACE was not significantly associated with PTSD. Stratified analyses by the presence of ACE showed that damage due to the earthquake/tsunami was associated with PTSD only among those without ACEs; more specifically, among non-ACE respondents the PR of PTSD associated with house damage was 6.67 (95% CI = 1.66–26.80), while for the loss of a relative or a close friend it was 3.56 (95% CI = 1.18–10.75). In contrast, no statistically significant associations were observed among those with ACEs. Conclusion.: Following the Great East Japan earthquake/tsunami in 2011 a higher risk of developing PTSD symptoms was observed in 2013 especially among older individuals without ACEs. This suggests that ACEs might affect how individuals respond to subsequent traumatic events later in life.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Y. Inoue

Andrew Stickley


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

British Journal of Religious Education 2017, : 1-10.

Taking its point of departure in the idea that language is never neutral but always coded in the masculine or the feminine (Irigaray), the main purpose of the paper is to explore the gendered coding of Religious Education teaching and how this coding interplays in shaping relationships and knowledge in the classroom. As recent research shows, debates about religion are becoming increasingly aggressive in many Western democracies and Religious Education is not unaffected by this. Drawing on Luce Irigaray’s notion of sexual difference the paper argues that RE tends to have a masculine coding in its overemphasis on beliefs, creeds and concepts. This not only positions both girls and boys as feminine in relation to (masculine) religion, it also fails to offer the more nuanced understanding of religious life so well needed today. The paper is divided into three sections. The first outlines briefly, theoretically and methodologically, the larger study of which this paper is part. The second offers an exposition of Irigaray’s thinking on sexual difference, and the third relates her philosophy to three empirical examples. The paper ends with a summary of the main points of the argument and the implications of language matters for Religious Education teaching.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lovisa Bergdahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

-

The Lancet 2017, 389 (10082): 1885-1906.

Background The scale-up of tobacco control, especially after the adoption of the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control, is a major public health success story. Nonetheless, smoking remains a leading risk for early death and disability worldwide, and therefore continues to require sustained political commitment. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) offers a robust platform through which global, regional, and national progress toward achieving smoking-related targets can be assessed. Methods We synthesised 2818 data sources with spatiotemporal Gaussian process regression and produced estimates of daily smoking prevalence by sex, age group, and year for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015. We analysed 38 risk-outcome pairs to generate estimates of smoking-attributable mortality and disease burden, as measured by disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). We then performed a cohort analysis of smoking prevalence by birth-year cohort to better understand temporal age patterns in smoking. We also did a decomposition analysis, in which we parsed out changes in all-cause smoking-attributable DALYs due to changes in population growth, population ageing, smoking prevalence, and risk-deleted DALY rates. Finally, we explored results by level of development using the Socio-demographic Index (SDI). Findings Worldwide, the age-standardised prevalence of daily smoking was 25.0% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 24.2-25.7) for men and 5.4% (5.1-5.7) for women, representing 28.4% (25.8-31.1) and 34.4% (29.4-38.6) reductions, respectively, since 1990. A greater percentage of countries and territories achieved significant annualised rates of decline in smoking prevalence from 1990 to 2005 than in between 2005 and 2015; however, only four countries had significant annualised increases in smoking prevalence between 2005 and 2015 (Congo [Brazzaville] and Azerbaijan for men and Kuwait and Timor-Leste for women). In 2015, 11.5% of global deaths (6.4 million [95% UI 5.7-7.0 million]) were attributable to smoking worldwide, of which 52.2% took place in four countries (China, India, the USA, and Russia). Smoking was ranked among the five leading risk factors by DALYs in 109 countries and territories in 2015, rising from 88 geographies in 1990. In terms of birth cohorts, male smoking prevalence followed similar age patterns across levels of SDI, whereas much more heterogeneity was found in age patterns for female smokers by level of development. While smoking prevalence and risk-deleted DALY rates mostly decreased by sex and SDI quintile, population growth, population ageing, or a combination of both, drove rises in overall smoking-attributable DALYs in low-SDI to middle-SDI geographies between 2005 and 2015. Interpretation The pace of progress in reducing smoking prevalence has been heterogeneous across geographies, development status, and sex, and as highlighted by more recent trends, maintaining past rates of decline should not be taken for granted, especially in women and in low-SDI to middle-SDI countries. Beyond the effect of the tobacco industry and societal mores, a crucial challenge facing tobacco control initiatives is that demographic forces are poised to heighten smoking's global toll, unless progress in preventing initiation and promoting cessation can be substantially accelerated. Greater success in tobacco control is possible but requires effective, comprehensive, and adequately implemented and enforced policies, which might in turn require global and national levels of political commitment beyond what has been achieved during the past 25 years.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marissa B. Reitsma

Mall Leinsalu

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Cultural Journalisn in the Nordic Countries. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2017. 111-133.

This chapter compares how Nordic public service media institutions (Finland: YLE; Norway: NRK; Sweden: SVT/SR) de ne and interpret their remits regarding cultural news. Relying on policy documents, interviews with managing cultural news editors and a sample week’s broadcast and online cultural news output, the results show distinctive national di erences in the ways cultural news is conceived, the resources and organisation of the cultural news desks, and di erences in news content during the week studied. e countries are most similar in their broad popular culture o ering, and by that fact that all the companies provide broader cultural news coverage on their websites than in their broadcast versions. However, the distinctions between the online and o ine platforms are less clear than those between the three countries. So, despite the commonalities of the Nordic media model, the values and practices of cultural journalism show enough di erences to warrant further study. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Heikki Hellman

Andreas Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Journalism

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

International Journal of Human Rights 2017, 21 (4): 464-481.

The Bolivian constitution of 2009 has been classified as one of the most progressive in the world regarding indigenous rights. The indigenous principles of Suma Qamaña/Vivir Bien/Good Living on the harmonious relationship between humans and nature are established in the constitution. Nonetheless, these rights clash with the constitutionally recognised rights of the nation state to extract and commercialise natural resources (mainly hydrocarbons and mining) under the banner of redistributive justice, welfare reforms and the common good, in this study labelled the dilemma of extractive development. The article is based on ethnographic fieldwork and combines a political economy perspective on the extractive dilemma, while similarly examining the tensions between ethnically defined rights in relation to broader human rights in terms of values and norms related to welfare and conditions of living. The ethnic identity is multifaceted in Bolivia. Large segments of the indigenous population prefer to identify in class terms. The class-ethnicity tensions have altered throughout history, according to changing socio-economic, cultural and political settings. A central argument is that, during Evo Morales' presidency, class-based human rights in practice tend to be superior to the ethnically defined rights, as a reflection of the dilemma of extractive development.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rickard Lalander

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Foucault och antiken. Hägersten : TankeKraft Förlag, 2017. 343-359.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marcia Cavalcante

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Foucault och antiken. Hägersten : TankeKraft Förlag, 2017. 279-327.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Charlotta Weigelt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Foucault och antiken. Hägersten : TankeKraft Förlag, 2017. 177-199.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gustav Strandberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Foucault och antiken. Hägersten : TankeKraft Förlag, 2017. 49-87.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Sehlberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2017.

I debatten om den svenska skolans kris lyfts ofta betydelsen av de omfattande reformer som genomfördes under några år kring 1990 fram. Det gäller framför allt kommunaliseringen, införandet av skolpeng och det fria skolvalet. Hur gick besluten till? Vilka var de centrala aktörerna? Vad var syftet med reformerna?I juli 2014 bjöd Samtidshistoriska institutet vid Södertörns högskola tillsammans med Lärarnas Riksförbund in några aktörer som på olika sätt varit aktiva under 1990-talets skolreformer till ett vittnesseminarium. Utgångspunkten var att de skulle ge sin minnesbild av skeendet, vilken roll de själva spelat, samt hur de nu, cirka 25 år senare såg på resultatet.Medverkande: Lars Leijonborg (FP), f.d. utbildningsminister och partiledare, Christer Wretborn f.d. ambassadör, departementsråd och central tjänsteman vid kommunaliseringen 1989, Ann-Cathrine Haglund (M), f.d. landshövding, ordförande Riksdagens utbildningsutskott 1991–1993, Peje Emilsson, grundare av och ordförande för Kunskapsskolan och Bo Jansson, förbundsordförande, Lärarnas riksförbund.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johanna Ringarp

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. : Oxford University Press, 2017. -.

Membership in the European Union (EU) entails adjustments or changes in national democracies. Sweden joined the EU in 1995, and EU membership has given rise to controversies in the public debate as well as in the academic community. Four main scholarly and related themes are addressed here.First is the discursive construction of the question of democracy in relation to European integration. In an effort to legitimize membership in the public debate, the consequences in terms of sovereignty were summarized in the official Swedish discourse on EU membership as a loss in formal sovereignty but an increase in real sovereignty. The conclusions became known as the calculus of sovereignty. This conceptual innovation entailed a reinterpretation of popular sovereignty, as stipulated by the Swedish constitution, as well as of democracy, implying that efficiency or problem-solving capacity was emphasized more than procedural democracy. Increased economic and political interdependence had created a situation where independent political decisions were seen as ineffective.Second is the controversy surrounding the question of influence and the extent to which Sweden is exerting influence in the EU. This issue came to the fore in connection with the euro referendum in 2003. While some argued that remaining outside the euro would come with a political price—marginalization—others emphasized the lack of evidence for such effects. To some extent, this remains a moot point, not least as a result of the expansion and importance of the euro zone.Third is the question of whether or not there is political opposition, that is, conflict rather than consensus in EU affairs. Recent research claims that (allegedly almost nonexistent) previous research had underestimated the degree of political opposition or conflict, notably in parliament. Moreover, results suggest that there is variation in EU opposition across time and policy areas. However, the key question here should be whether or not there is effective opposition, making a difference to policy outcomes. Several reforms have been initiated to strengthen the involvement of the parliament in EU policymaking, but none has really sought to challenge the balance between parliamentary scrutiny and executive discretion.Fourth is the state and different interpretations of either decentering or centering effects. Whereas some claim that fragmentation or decentralization is the central feature of the Europeanization of the Swedish state, other researchers submit that the predominant tendency is rather centralization, as the demands of EU decision making—not least EU summitry—on national policy coordination have been a principal driving factor in this process.These are the main themes in the debate over the EU and EU membership in Sweden. Included here are a series of analytical narratives and counternarratives, as well as a discussion of important implications for the national democracy and for the distribution or redistribution of power among domestic political actors therein. In sum, any interpretation of modern-day politics must now take into account the significance of the EU, operating through Europeanizing impacts.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Karl Magnus Johansson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Organizational Change Management 2017, 30 (3): 299-311.

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze how political leaders can rhetorically use social media to construct their leadership, with a special focus on character – rhetorical ethos. Design/methodology/approach: The authors used a qualitative case study which consisted of two political leaders’ activities on Twitter. The leaders were chosen on the basis of similarity – both foreign ministers in Scandinavian countries and early adapters to ICT. All tweets, including photos, for selected period were analyzed qualitatively with the classical rhetorical concept of ethos. Findings: Social media is the virtual square for political leadership. The two political leaders studied use social media similarly for rhetorical means and aims, with ethos as rhetorical strategy. The rhetorical ethos they constructed differs radically though: busy diplomat vs a super-social Iron man. There is no single constructed ethos that political leaders aim for. Research limitations/implications: Even though this is just one qualitative case study, it shows a variety of rhetorical means and constructs of ethos in political leadership. Practical implications: The study shows a possibility for political leaders to construct their own image and character through social media, for a potentially large audience of voters, without being filtered by political parties or media. Originality/value: This study contributes to the evolving area of rhetoric in leadership/management and it adds to knowledge about how political leaders use social media.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

L. L. Falkman

Jenny Madestam

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

Academy of Public AdministrationSchool of Social Sciences

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Journal of Leadership in Education 2017, : 1-19.

A school principal’s workload is recognised as being heavy, with an imbalance between demands and resources. This paper contributes to the development of collective leadership. The principalship constellations of six schools in Sweden were studied with the aim of strengthening the current knowledge about structures and experiences of shared principalship. The empirical basis is qualitative data from interviews with principals and vice-principals. The analytical focus was on how the sharing structures were organised and how the shared principalship was experienced. The results point to a considerable variation in the organisational structures of shared principalship. Despite the type of model, form and constellation, the principals and vice-principals voiced a striking sense of relief in not feeling alone in their duties, as problems and troubles became manageable. An intensified interaction level in the principalship constellation created opportunities to develop competence. Theoretically, this study broadens the invited leadership concept to include horizontal invitations across unit boundaries between principals in different units within the same school. The knowledge contribution of this study is useful in discussing the legal possibilities for shared principalship, which may be especially relevant in times when the Swedish school system is being criticised for not delivering good student outcomes.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

M. Döös

Jenny Madestam

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

Academy of Public AdministrationSchool of Social Sciences

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Journal of Public Sector Management 2017, 30 (4): 310-327.

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze how local and central authorities choose between lowest price and more complex scoring rules when they design supplier-selection mechanisms for public procurements. Five hypotheses are tested: a high level of cost uncertainty and highly non-verifiable quality makes the use of the lowest-price supplier-selection method less likely. Organizational habits and transaction-cost considerations influence the choice of mechanism. Strong quality concerns make complex rules more likely. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis departures from normative theory (rational choice) and is based on the regression analysis and survey data comprising a gross sample of 40 contracting authorities and detailed information about 651 procurements. Findings: More complex scoring rules are used more often when the authority is uncertain about costs and about delivered quality. Authority effects are also found to directly and indirectly influence the choice of supplier-selection method, suggesting that tendering design is partly driven by local habits and institutional inertia. Practical implications: The authors argue that, from a normative point of view, lowest price is an adequate method when the degree of uncertainty is low, for example, because the procured products are standardized and since quality can be verified. When there is significant cost uncertainty, it is better to use the so-called economically most advantageous tender (EMAT) method. (Preferably this should be done by assigning monetary values to different quality levels.) If there is significant uncertainty concerning delivered quality, the contracting authority should retain a degree of discretion, so as to be able to reward good-quality performance in observable but non-verifiable quality dimensions; options to extend the contract and subjective assessments of quality are two possibilities. The main findings are that EMAT and more complex scoring rules are used more often when the contracting authorities report that they experience substantial uncertainty concerning delivered quality and actual costs and that these factors tend to decrease the weight given to price, in line with the predictions. However, the authors also find that this result is mainly driven by variations between authorities, rather than by between-products variation for the same authority. This is from a training of professionals and regulation perspective of policy relevance. Social implications: Contract allocation based on habits rather than rational ground could implicate the waste of resources (tax payers money) as it adventures the matching of the preferences of the public sector (the objective, subject matter, of the procurement) and what the potential supplier offers in its tender. Originality/value: Although the principles for supplier selection are regulated by law they give the contracting authority substantial freedom in designing the scoring rule and in choosing what quality criteria to use. The tension between different objectives and the more general question whether the choices made by authorities reflect rational decision making or institutional inertia together motivate the current study. While the design of the supplier-selection mechanism is an important consideration in procurement practice, it has attracted relatively little attention from the academic community.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

S. Lundberg

Mats Bergman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Economics

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Arkiv, samhälle och forskning 2017, 1 : 6-26.

Rikard Friberg von Sydow analyserar den offentliga utredning som är förarbetet till Patientjournalslag (1985:562) och hur den hanterar patientintegriteten i en tid av begynnande användning av ADB. Författaren avslutar med reflektioner om hur 30 års utveckling påverkat integritetsfrågan och vilken integritetsproblematik som nu bör få uppmärksamhet.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rikard Friberg von Sydow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archival Sciences


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geopolitics 2017, : 1-28.

The essays collected in this forum discuss the geopolitical legacy of the Russian Revolution of 1917, one of the most momentous political events of the twentieth century. From a range of different academic disciplines and perspectives, the authors consider how the profound transformations in society and politics were refracted through space and geography, and how enduring these refractions proved to be. The authors focus on three themes that have been dominant in Russian affairs over the past century: 1)the problem of center-periphery relations, 2)the civilizational dynamics of Russia’s self-identification in relation to Europe and to Asia, and 3)the geopolitics of national identity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

P. Richardson

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Studenters skrivande i humaniora och samhällsvetenskap. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2017. 215-236.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Charlotte Rising Maria DanielssonKajsa Sköldvall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Swedish

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Studenters skrivande i humaniora och samhällsvetenskap. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2017. 187-213.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Magnusson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Swedish

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Studenters skrivande i humaniora och samhällsvetenskap. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2017. 171-185.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Hållsten

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Swedish

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Studenters skrivande i humaniora och samhällsvetenskap. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2017. 155-170.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Paulina Nyman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Swedish

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Year of publication

Type of publication

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe