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Emil Edenborg

Contact information

Emil Edenborg
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Alfred Nobels allé 7
Södertörns Högskola
Flemingsberg
Phone: +46 8 608 5236
Publications

Baltic Rim Economies 2018, 1 : 46-47.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nordicom Information 2017, 39 (1): 127-129.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift 2017, 119 (2): 338-341.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Postcolonial Studies 2017, 20 (3): 294-316.

Some states create geographical imaginaries that envision the homeland as coherent and good, and the spaces of Others as disordered, dangerous and therefore legitimate objects of violence. Such ‘violent cartographies’ serve not only to justify policy actions, but constitute bordering practices aiming to provide stability, integrity and continuity to the Self, sometimes referred to as ‘ontological security’. This article examines the role of creativity and artistic imagination in challenging dominant geopolitical narratives. It examines satire on the Russian-language internet, which played upon the Russian state’s geopolitical narrative about the war in Ukraine 2014–15. Three themes within this dominant narrative – (1) the imperialist idea of Russia as a modernising force, (2) the gendering of Ukraine as feminine and Europe as homosexual and (3) the idea that the current war was a re-enactment of Russia’s historical battle against fascism – all became the object of fun-making in satire. I argue that satire, by appropriating, repeating but slightly displacing official rhetoric in ways that make it appear ridiculous, may destabilise dominant narratives of ontological security and challenge their strive towards closure. Satire may expose the silences of dominant narratives and undermine the essentialism and binarism upon which they rely, opening up for estrangement and disidentification.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2017.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

The purpose of this dissertation is to explore the role of visibility in the production and contestation of belonging to political communities. On the basis of an empirical enquiry of Russian media during the 2010s, a theoretical conceptualization of the relation between visibility and belonging is suggested, starting in the idea that what becomes visible to publics and how, and what is rendered invisible, are the objects of constant political regulation and contestation. The suggested theory seeks to move beyond both an exclusively speech-oriented approach to belonging, and a binary view on visibility as either emancipatory or repressive. In three case studies, the thesis explores aspects of the problem of belonging and visibility. In all cases – each of which focuses on a specific project of belonging as enacted in contemporary Russian media – gendered, sexualized and ethnicized conceptions of community are at the center of the contestations. First, by analyzing narratives in Russian media about the 2013 ban on “homosexual propaganda”, the thesis shows that as projects of belonging produce specific gendered and sexualized conceptions of community, they seek to regulate the visibility of undesired, non-normative subjectivities. However, those regulatory efforts contain tensions that may serve as starting points for contestation. Second, by studying media narratives about the 2014 Sochi Olympics, the thesis shows that spectacular media events may serve to depoliticize particular notions of community by making them hypervisible and producing them as natural and inevitable, but such events may also serve as sites of repoliticization. Third, by analyzing how the Russian state-promoted narrative on the war in Ukraine 2014-15 was challenged, by Russian internet satire and by the media exposure of how Russian soldiers who had died in Ukraine were secretly buried, the thesis shows that contestations of dominant projects of belonging draw on invisibility, and often have an ambivalent, inside/outside relation to dominant narratives. The central claim of the thesis is that projects of belonging, aimed at (re)constituting political communities and their boundaries, seek to produce particular arrangements of visibility regulating what can be seen and how it can be seen in the public sphere, and what cannot be seen. Moreover, as visibility cannot be fixed entirely, precisely those arrangements become the target of political contestation. On a more analytically useful level, it is suggested that politics of belonging involves efforts to contain, amplify and contest visibility.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Newsletter of the Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies 2015, 32 (2): 11-15.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Sexuality & Culture 2015, 19 (2): 256-274.

This article investigates Russian mainstream media’s coverage of the 2013 legislation banning “propaganda for non-traditional sexuality”. Inspired by theories on belonging, media and visibility, it reconstructs a dominant narrative representing non-heterosexuals as threatening the future survival of the nation, as imposing the sex-radical norms of a minority onto the majority, or as connected to an imperialistic West which aims to destroy Russia. This story, it is argued, functions as a hegemonic grammar regulating how non-heterosexuality is seen and heard in the public sphere. However, it is argued that sometimes the linearity and cohesiveness of the narrative breaks down, when things appear that do not fit this model of interpretation. The analysis illustrates how contestations of belonging in contemporary media are increasingly structured according to the logic of visibility: dominant actors attempt to regulate what can be seen and heard in the public sphere whereas oppositional actors attempt to establish their own visibility in the mediated space of appearance, putting forward alternative constructions of the nation and who belongs to it.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift 2014, 116 (4): 471-472.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift 2014, 116 (3): 265-292.

In Russia, as in some other countries around the world, we are currently witnessing a wave of politically sanctioned homophobia, most concretely manifested in the 2013 law against “homosexual propaganda”. By examining Russian mainstream media reporting, this article aims to reconstruct a dominant narrative on homosexuality and LGBT rights. It is found that this narrative revolves around three tropes: 1) that non-heterosexuals are a threat to the nation, 2) that LGBT rights are about imposing the minority´s norms onto the majority; and 3) that LGBT rights is bound up with Western modernity, to which Russia offers an alternative. Discussing the findings in light of theories on nationalism, gender and sexuality, I argue that homophobia in Russia must be understood in a global geopolitical perspective: as an attempt to negotiate a meaningful international role for Russia in a world order where LGBT rights have become a symbolic marker of Western modernity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

East European Politics 2014, 30 (2): 192-209.

The theoretical point of departure of this paper is that the perspective of political myth adds to the understanding of political developments in Russia. The upcoming Olympic Winter Games in Sochi in 2014 are discursively constructed as a manifestation of Russia's return to great power status. In official Russian discourse, there is an encounter between the Russian great power myth and the myth of Olympism, both of which are employed to strengthen the status of Russia and of President Putin personally. Thus, the Olympic values of humanism, internationalism, and progress are merged with Russian great power ideals. But there are also examples where the prevailing myths are turned around to criticise the regime and the Sochi Games. However, the most serious challenge to the Putin regime may stem from the great power myth itself, should the regime prove unable to deliver what it requires.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Bo Petersson

Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Zhurnal Sotsiologii i Sotsialnoi Antropologii 2013, 70 (5): 221-234.

Mediated mega-events are essentially projects of belonging: about imagining communities and about creating attachment to such collective selves. However, events like the Olympic Games are not only an opportunity for states to reinforce official constructions of belonging but can also be sites for the articulation and dissemination of contesting identity narratives. This article investigates Russian media narratives around the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, mainstream as well as alternative. It is argued that the Russian regime uses the Olympics to create national and global visibility for a specific project of belonging: that of a re-emerging great power – strong and united – but also an inclusive and tolerant place which can serve as an international example of ethnic and religious conviviality. This imagined community, however, rests on exclusions and silences. In addition, three alternative projects of belonging, emerging from the Circassian diaspora, LGBT rights activists and Islamists, are examined. Although these are very different, they all attempt to use the spotlight of the Sochi Olympics to disrupt the mainstream narrative and create visibility for challenging imaginations of community. On the more general level the article argues that the media contestations around the Sochi Olympics provide an insight into how the quest for visibility has become a central dynamic in the Russian media environment.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Neprikosnovenny zapas 2013, 88 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Bo Petersson

Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Sochi predicament. Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013. 72-94.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: IMER idag. Stockholm : Liber, 2013. 134-159.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

A. Schlaug

Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Euxeinos 2013, 12 : 15-25.

This article examines what image of Russia is being projected in official rhetoric about the Sochi Olympics. It is argued that the imagined community being displayed is a diverse, inclusive and tolerant nation, even an international example of ethnic conviviality. The article puts this narrative in historical perspective, relating it to the mnogonatsionalnost policies of tsarist, Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. This imagination, though explicitly very inclusive, rests on important exclusions and silences. By selective exhibitions of minority-groups the other is domesticated, stereotyped and reduced to kitsch and folklore, glossing over conflict-ridden histories and prevailing inequalities.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

International journal of cultural studies 2011, 14 (1): 71-89.

This article explores how the image of the USA has developed in two major Russian daily newspapers, Izvestiya and Komsomolskaya Pravda, in a time period comprised of a total 20 weeks' of study in the years of 1984, 1994, 2004 and 2009. For Russia this time span was dramatic: it moved from seemingly stable superpower in the 1980s, over the chaos after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, to the partial comeback to great power status at the beginning of the 21st century. While telling the story of how the image of the USA has evolved, the article also describes how Russian self-images have developed. The image projected of the USA was Manichean in the 1980s, whereas the most benevolent images were found in the 1990s. The examples from 2004 and 2009 reflect an assertive Russia that is back on the world stage. The USA is here again often criticized, but also - as before - comprises the scale against which Russia itself is measured.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Bo Petersson

Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Coauthor, Södertörn University

Year of publication

Type of publication