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Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Kontaktuppgifter

Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari
Lektor
Alfred Nobels allé 7
Södertörns högskola
Flemingsberg
Telefon: 08-608 52 81
Fax: 08-608 45 10
MD 377 Moas Båge
Publikationer

The AI Magazine 2016, 37 (2): 91-94.

The workshop program at the 11th Annual AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment was held November 14-15, 2015, at the University of California, Santa Cruz, USA. The program included four workshops (one of which was a joint workshop): Artificial Intelligence in Adversarial Real-Time Games, Experimental AI in Games, Intelligent Narrative Technologies and Social Believability in Games, and Player Modeling. This article contains the reports of three of the four workshops.

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne

Camille Barot

Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2016

Institution/Centrumbildning

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Forskarutbildningsområde

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In: Interactive Storytelling. Cham : .

In story-making games, players create stories together by using narrative tokens. Often there is a tension between players playing to win using the rules of a story-making game, and collaboratively creating a good story. In this paper, we introduce a competitive story-making game prototype coupled with computational methods intended to be used for both supporting players’ creativity and narrative coherence.

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne

Philip L. Lopes

Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2014

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

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Forskarutbildningsområde

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In: Advances in Computer Entertainment. : Springer International Publishing.

The Social Believability in Games Workshop intends to be a point of interaction for researchers and game developers interested in different aspects of modelling, discussing, and developing believable social agents and Non-Player Characters (NPCs). This can include discussions around behaviour based on social and behavioural science theories and models, social affordances when interacting with game worlds and more. The intention is to invite participants from a multitude of disciplines in order to create a broad spectrum of approaches to the area.

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne

Harko Verhagen

Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2013

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

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Forskarutbildningsområde

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In: ECREA’s Pre-Conference. : .

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne

Harko Verhagen

Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2012

Institution/Centrumbildning

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Forskarutbildningsområde

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: , 2011. ( ; )

With the current set of design tools and methods available to game designers, vast portions of the space of possible games are not currently reachable. In the past, technological advances such as improved graphics and new controllers have driven the creation of new forms of gameplay, but games have still not made great strides into new gameplay experiences. We argue that the development of innovative artificial intelligence (AI) systems plays a crucial role in the exploration of currently unreachable spaces. To aid in exploration, we suggest a practice called AI-based game design, an iterative design process that deeply integrates the affordances of an AI system within the context of game design. We have applied this process in our own projects, and in this paper we present how it has pushed the boundaries of current game genres and experiences, as well as discuss the future AI-based game design.

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne

Anne Sullivan

Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2011

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

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Forskarutbildningsområde

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In: . : .

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne

Harko Verhagen

Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2011

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

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Forskarutbildningsområde

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In: Proceedings of the 5th European Conference on Games Based Learning. Athens, Greece : The National and Kapodistrian University of Athens.

This paper proposes a conceptual model for non-player characters for use in a serious game application. The game is aimed for teacher training with a focus on training of social skills related to conflict handling. Conflict handling is difficult to emulate in a realistic way and appears not frequent enough in the practical training part of teacher education to enable sufficient training. Also, training in a real world situation may be ethically less sound. To develop a serious game for conflict handling training, we need to create non-player characters that can emulate conflicts in a realistic way. For this, we need to extend current models with social and emotional aspects. We present previously developed meta-models that enable us to propose such a model and combine these and recent game research to a Model Social Game Agent.

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne

Harko Verhagen

Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2011

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

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Forskarutbildningsområde

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In: Computer Games (CGAMES) 2011. Louisville, KY : IEEE Computer Society.

This paper explores the possibilities for believable game agents (NPCs) through the implementation of a Model Social Game Agent (MSGA). We present a high level model focusing on the conceptual framework for implementing MSGAs on a Second Life server.

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne

Magnus Johansson

Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2011

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

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Forskarutbildningsområde

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In: Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference. : Digitial Games Research Organisation (DiGRA).

This paper describes the social actions called ‘affective actions’ that are implemented in the prototype multiplayer game world The Pataphysic Institute (PI). An aim of this paper is to demonstrate how a game mechanic can result in a certain set of dynamics or play patterns. Affective actions are but one feature of the many that make up the game world of PI. In this paper, the feature is used as a vertical slice into the game design. The aim is to, by using this slice, show the founding the principles of the game, the play tests that informed the design, as well as the play patterns that were observed as they emerged in a series of game mastered play–test sessions.

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne
Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2011

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

-


Forskarutbildningsområde

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In: ECREA 2010 – 3rd European Communication Conference, Avatars and Humans. Hamburg, Germany : Hamburg Media School, Hans Bredow Institute for Media Research, Ilmenau University of Technology.

This paper is concerned with approaches to semi-autonomous avatars in virtual game worlds, and degrees of autonomy in relation to player-control. Approaches to semi-autonomous avatars can be divided into three groups based on the design goals of using them: relief, expression and impression. Players can be relieved of cognitive and operational load by for example automating the animations of body-language of avatars. Means of expression through body-language, types of actions performed, and reaction tendencies can express the nature of specific avatars to other players in the same world. Character-information available only to avatars' own players and personalised, subjective world-representations create individual impressions of worlds and avatars' parts in them. A shared aim of these approaches is to increase the believability of elements in the game worlds and the sense of presence and immersion for players. In this paper the prototype Pataphysic Institute is used to illustrate how expression and impression can be utilized by consideration of the implementation of possible characterising action potential of avatars.

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne
Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2010

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

-


Forskarutbildningsområde

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In: Proceedings of the Sixth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment. Stanford University, Palo Alto, California : AAAI Press.

The Pataphysic Institute (PI) is a research prototype multi-player game world. In PI, the personalities of the inhabitants are the base for the game mechanics. When interacting with other characters the potential emotional reactions depend upon avatars' current mood and personality. PI is built with inspiration from personality psychology and affect theory in an attempt to mimic possible emotional responses in order to give the player support in role-playing. The mental states of characters depend on their personalities and on their current moods. Moods differ according to context and to recent experiences. Emotional experiences become memories and define the relationships between characters. The mental state is the sum of the character and governs what actions can be performed in a given moment. In order to do certain things the characters need to be in certain moods — and for this the players need to game their avatars' emotions, and game their relationships.

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne
Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2010

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

-


Forskarutbildningsområde

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In: . Monterrey, California : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne
Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2010

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

-


Forskarutbildningsområde

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Because games set in persistent virtual game worlds (VGWs) have massive numbers of players, these games need methods of characterisation for playable characters (PCs) that differ from the methods used in traditional narrative media. VGWs have a number of particularly interesting qualities. Firstly, VGWs are places where players interact with and create elements carrying narrative potential. Secondly, players add goals, motives and driving forces to the narrative potential of a VGW, which sometimes originates from the ordinary world. Thirdly, the protagonists of the world are real people, and when acting in the world their characterisation is not carried out by an author, but expressed by players characterising their PCs. How they can express themselves in ways that characterise them depend on what they can do, and how they can do it, and this characterising action potential (CAP) is defined by the game design of particular VGWs. In this thesis, two main questions are explored. Firstly, how can CAP be designed to support players in expressing consistent  characters in VGWs? Secondly, how can VGWs support role-play in their rule-systems? By using iterative design, I explore the design space of CAP by building a semiautonomous agent structure, the Mind Module (MM) and apply it in five experimental prototypes where the design of CAP and other game features is derived from the MM. The term semiautonomy is used because the agent structure is designed to be used by a PC, and is thus partly controlled by the system and partly by the player. The MM models a PC's personality as a collection of traits, maintains dynamic emotional state as a function of interactions with objects in the environment, and summarises a PC's current emotional state in terms of `mood'.   The MM consists of a spreading-activation network of affect nodes that are interconnected by weighted relationships.  There are four types of affect node: personality trait nodes, emotion nodes, mood nodes, and sentiment nodes. The values of the nodes defining the personality traits of characters govern an individual PC's state of mind through these weighted relationships, resulting in values characterising for a PC's personality. The sentiment nodes constitute emotionally valenced connections between entities. For example, a PC can `feel' anger toward another PC. This thesis also describes a guided paper-prototype play-test of  the VGW prototype World of Minds, in which the game mechanics build upon the MM's model of personality and emotion. In a case study of AI-based game design, lessons learned from the test are presented. The participants in the test were able to form and communicate mental models of the MM and game mechanics, validating the design and giving valuable feedback for further development. Despite the constrained scenarios presented to test players, they discovered interesting, alternative strategies, indicating that for game design the `mental physics' of the MM may open up new  possibilities.The results of the play-test influenced the further development of the MM as it was used in the digital VGW prototype the Pataphysic Institute. In the Pataphysic Institute the CAP of PCs is largely governed by their mood. Depending on which mood  PCs are in they can cast different `spells', which affect values such as mental energy, resistance and emotion in their targets. The mood also governs which `affective actions' they can perform toward other PCs and what affective actions they are receptive to. By performing affective actions on each other PCs can affect each others' emotions, which - if they are strong - may result in sentiments toward each other. PCs' personalities govern the individual fluctuations of mood and emotions, and define which types of spell PCs can cast. Formalised social relationships such as friendships affect CAP, giving players more energy, resistance, and other benefits. PCs' states of mind are reflected in the VGW in the form of physical manifestations that emerge if an emotion is very strong. These manifestations are entities which cast different spells on PCs in close proximity, depending on the emotions that the manifestations represent. PCs can also partake in authoring manifestations that become part of the world and the game-play in it. In the Pataphysic Institute potential story structures are governed by the relations the sentiment nodes constitute between entities.Because games set in persistent virtual game worlds (VGWs) have massive numbers of players, these games need methods of characterisation for playable characters (PCs) that differ from the methods used in traditional narrative media. VGWs have a number of particularly interesting qualities. Firstly, VGWs are places where players interact with and create elements carrying narrative potential. Secondly, players add goals, motives and driving forces to the narrative potential of a VGW, which sometimes originates from the ordinary world. Thirdly, the protagonists of the world are real people, and when acting in the world their characterisation is not carried out by an author, but expressed by players characterising their PCs. How they can express themselves in ways that characterise them depend on what they can do, and how they can do it, and this characterising action potential (CAP) is defined by the game design of particular VGWs. In this thesis, two main questions are explored. Firstly, how can CAP be designed to support players in expressing consistent  characters in VGWs? Secondly, how can VGWs support role-play in their rule-systems? By using iterative design, I explore the design space of CAP by building a semiautonomous agent structure, the Mind Module (MM) and apply it in five experimental prototypes where the design of CAP and other game features is derived from the MM. The term \textit{semiautonomy} is used because the agent structure is designed to be used by a PC, and is thus partly controlled by the system and partly by the player. The MM models a PC's personality as a collection of traits, maintains dynamic emotional state as a function of interactions with objects in the environment, and summarises a PC's current emotional state in terms of `mood'.   The MM consists of a spreading-activation network of affect nodes that are interconnected by weighted relationships.  There are four types of affect node: personality trait nodes, emotion nodes, mood nodes, and sentiment nodes. The values of the nodes defining the personality traits of characters govern an individual PC's state of mind through these weighted relationships, resulting in values characterising for a PC's personality. The sentiment nodes constitute emotionally valenced connections between entities. For example, a PC can `feel' anger toward another PC. This thesis also describes a guided paper-prototype play-test of  the VGW prototype World of Minds, in which the game mechanics build upon the MM's model of personality and emotion. In a case study of AI-based game design, lessons learned from the test are presented. The participants in the test were able to form and communicate mental models of the MM and game mechanics, validating the design and giving valuable feedback for further development. Despite the constrained scenarios presented to test players, they discovered interesting, alternative strategies, indicating that for game design the `mental physics' of the MM may open up new  possibilities.The results of the play-test influenced the further development of the MM as it was used in the digital VGW prototype the Pataphysic Institute. In the Pataphysic Institute the CAP of PCs is largely governed by their mood. Depending on which mood  PCs are in they can cast different `spells', which affect values such as mental energy, resistance and emotion in their targets. The mood also governs which `affective actions' they can perform toward other PCs and what affective actions they are receptive to. By performing affective actions on each other PCs can affect each others' emotions, which - if they are strong - may result in sentiments toward each other. PCs' personalities govern the individual fluctuations of mood and emotions, and define which types of spell PCs can cast. Formalised social relationships such as friendships affect CAP, giving players more energy, resistance, and other benefits. PCs' states of mind are reflected in the VGW in the form of physical manifestations that emerge if an emotion is very strong. These manifestations are entities which cast different spells on PCs in close proximity, depending on the emotions that the manifestations represent. PCs can also partake in authoring manifestations that become part of the world and the game-play in it. In the Pataphysic Institute potential story structures are governed by the relations the sentiment nodes constitute between entities.

FörfattarePubliceringsårÄmne

Clive Fencott

Mirjam Palosaari Eladhari

Östersjö- och Östeuropaanknytning

Nej
2009

Institution/Centrumbildning

-

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Forskarutbildningsområde

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Medförfattare vid Södertörns högskola

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