About us / Subjects

Media Technology

Graphic element for the subject of Media TechnologyMedia Technology at Södertörn University is an interdisciplinary field that includes technology, social sciences and humanities. It covers areas such as web design, photography, film and interaction design.

The subject has both practical and theoretical aspects. These include craft-oriented skills, such as text and image management, and the editing and production of moving images, but also more theoretical discussions about IT's role in society. Media Technology is teaching-intensive compared to many other university subjects, but much of the work remains autonomous and is often done on a project basis. We offer courses up to Master's (second-cycle) level and offer courses on several Bachelor's programmes.

Publications

Publications from the DiVA publications database are listed here on an ongoing basis.
Publications

In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

This paper presents the SWAY prototype that encourages people to explore aspects around balance and posture in a playful way. The prototype senses small movements and shifts in posture using a Kinect sensor, and translates these movements to the tilting of a platform holding a set of marbles, and to haptic feedback in the form of vibrations. The prototype provides an interactive experience focusing on building body awareness with a particular focus on balance and posture. The design inquiry provided new insights with respect to reinforcement of bodily experiences and how different modalities affect the guiding of attention.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

S. Asplund

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems 2018, : 1-13.

The paper reports on a study of community gardening in Stockholm. We contribute to the body of knowledge about the sustainability of community gardens and this new form of citizen-led initiatives in Stockholm, with the ambition of creating a debate about the best way to sustain and develop these initiatives in Sweden. We argue that although community gardening may provide leverage for means of developing a sustainable city, it is a marginal phenomenon and contributes little to sustainable development its present form. Through interviews we have investigated how the citizens and municipality officers of Stockholm try to adapt to the renewed interest in community gardening by looking at the policy makers’, municipality officers’ and grassroots movements’ incentives to start community gardens. We specifically focus on how the community gardeners articulate their reasons for participating in collaborative initiatives in the city and how these expectations evolve when they are faced with the reality of gardening and the problems relating to producing food in the city. We have found that there are a growing number of citizens and local authorities advocating community gardening, but the sustainability and endurance of gardens are hampered by vague responsibilities, lack of leadership and unclear expectations of the outcome. Community gardening cases in Stockholm contribute to the debate by exemplifying how formal (e.g. policy making) and informal advocacy (e.g. civic engagement in community gardening) groups are collaborating, but also showing that they often have different agendas and initial motivations for setting up new gardens. We argue that uncritical enthusiasm results in an overly instrumental approach to governance of community gardening and that the sustainability and endurance of the community gardening is not an issue that the governing bodies plan for, and hence it is forgotten. We suggest some routes forward, involving employing facilitators from various stakeholders such as the municipality, housing companies and various NGOs.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria NormarkMadeleine Bonow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental ScienceMedia Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

: Springer, 2018.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

A. Hautamäki

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

This paper presents a case study of an interactive performance that was produced and designed to encourage civic engagement and reflection in relation to the social tensions in a low-income suburb, mostly inhabited by people with immigrant backgrounds. The design of the technological setup in the performance encouraged participation by means of text entries that audience members could share with others. The analysis draws on the corpus of interview and observational data collected, as well as the related text messages that were shared during the performance. We illustrate the different levels at which citizens make sense of societal issues they are concerned about, as well as the audience-citizens' perception of participating in such an artistic experience.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Chiara Rossitto

Maria Normark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

interactions 2017, 24 (6): 50-55.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Juliet Norton

Maria Normark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings IEEE BigData 2017. Boston, MA : IEEE.

The accumulation and use of data are rapidly expanding. With it, new kinds of interactions emerge that go beyond traditional data analytics, to the point at which a whole new research area of human-data interaction is has been suggested. Our study reconsiders cluster analysis from this point of view. We aim to redesign the process to be more interactive and transparent for purposes beyond conventional data analysis. We address the core issue of cluster analysis, namely what criteria are to determine the homogeneity of a cluster by means of breaking the algorithm into a sequence of explorative subdivisions proceeding as a human-data dialogue. The system provides the human agent with a heuristic. It is formed by sorting the variables of the data set by descending orthogonality against the variable that was applied as the subdivision criterion of the previous iteration. This allows minimizing redundancy of the analysis while securing distinctions relevant for the analytic intention and contextuality, which go beyond the reach of algorithmic decision. The proposed method constitutes a quick and intuitive access to data mining, facilitating new insights and identifying actionable generalizations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

O. Pitkänen

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Game design research. Pittsburgh : ETC Press, 2017. 1-14.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jussi Holopainen

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Pittsburgh : ETC Press, 2017.

The design has been a study topic in various fields where design methods have been the focus of inquiry.Design research, or design studies as it is also called, has been gaining momentum as a field of academic inquiry since the beginning of 20th century. Originally, design research focused on design methods and processes but it has moved to cover more varied research questions related to design. Current research topics include, for example, how to study design and what methods can be used to study design along with the more fundamental questions such as what is design in the first place and what kinds of knowledge design research produces. The topics of design research have also become more wide and varied with active research on architecture, information systems, product, service, graphic, and interaction design to name a few. Game design research, however, has received surprisingly little attention regardless of the large body of work in the more general design research.The main aim of this book is to situate game design research within and alongside general design research.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jussi Holopainen

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: Artificial Intelligence and Cognition 2016. : .

The study introduces a model of analysis and synthesis, respective abductive and deductive reasoning, using the three-component inferential system, which is constituted by a perspective-relative augmentation of Gärdenfors's theory of Conceptual Spaces (CS). A general formulation of Perspective, based on our earlier work, corresponds to prioritization among property dimensions. Instead of assuming one conceptual space as in the CS, a distinction is made between the high-dimensional description of the discourse/domain termed Ontospace, and the two-dimensional perspectival space onto which a Perspectiverelative hierarchical conceptualization is projected, referred to as the Perspectival Space. In this setting, deduction is the inference of Perspective-relative conceptualization of the ontospace, while abduction is the reasoning of the Perspective that accounts for a given conceptualization of the ontospace, given in a form of a target cluster This model is articulated on an abstraction level beyond algorithmic implementation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

A. Hautamäki

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The 18th annual meeting of the Association of Internet Researchers (AoIR 2017). : .

This paper is based on a study of users experiences and practices of meeting potential new partners online through the use of the mobile dating service Tinder. The aim of the study is to explore how users experience design features and functionalities for online dating practices. By exploring the use of functionalities and features in the location-based mobile application Tinder, we offer a broad understanding of the relationship between designed functionalities and dating practices that users experience through these features. The empirical material presented in the paper is drawn from a study based on a mixed method approach, combining an initial observational study, an online survey, with focus group interviews. Four specific designed functions are highlighted in our empirical data: the connection with Facebook, the profile cards of users, the swipe-centered mutual match function, and geographical proximity. These functions contribute to the specific user experiences of control and reward. Our findings indicate that online dating practices are formed by an inseparable interplay of design functionalities, users attitudes and the use of specific mobile applications that taken together contributes to the overall online dating experiences.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anton Rosén

Fatima Jonsson

Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Consumption, markets & culture 2017, : 1-13.

This article explores the gamification trend sweeping the globe promising increased engagement and motivation, in practically any industry, context and culture, based on a stratagem of “game design elements in non-game contexts,” which is its most quoted definition [Deterding, Sebastian, Miguel Sicart, Lennart Nacke, Kenton O'Hara, and Dan Dixon. 2011. “Gamification – Using Game-Design Elements in Non-Gaming Contexts.” Paper presented at the CHI EA “11 proceedings of the 2011 annual conference extended abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Vancouver, BC, May 7–12.]. The rise of gamification as marketplace icon is examined and particularly claims that position gamification as the manifestation of a wider societal transformation into playful societies – a “ludic turn.” Many of these grandiose statements are the result of ahistoricity and ambiguity regarding the definition of gamification. Based on game philosophy, game studies and gamification research this article posits gamification as an emergent perspective, as distinct conceptualisation, on the rule-driven organisation of sociotechnical management systems that reference “games.” Of particular importance is the role of rules. Examples such as Frequent Flyer Programmes and Foursquare are analysed according to the player/consumer positions they bestow, which are explored from participatory, co-creational, critical and game philosophical perspectives. Conclusively, a “gameful” perspective of rule-generated goal-oriented behaviour, or “playful” perspective of instinctive and limitless fun, shed two challenging perspectives on the interpretation of gamification in the marketplace.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mikolaj Dymek

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Human IT 2017, 13 (3): 54-84.

The purpose of this article is to address some challenges facing media intelligence in general, and competitive intelligence in particular within an altered information landscape. To understand this new situation, the notion of social and multimodal media intelligence are introduced. With cases taken primarily from the Swedish media intelligence sector, we argue that data driven media intelligence today needs to pay increasing attention to new forms of (A.) crowd-oriented and (B.) multimedia-saturated information. As a subcategory of media intelligence, competitive intelligence refers to the gathering of publicly available information about an organisation or a company’s competitors—using it to gain business advantages. Traditionally such intelligence has implied a set of techniques and tools that transforms numerical or textual data into useful information for business analysis. Today, however, we argue that such techniques need to consider media alterations in both a social and multimodal direction. Our analysis hence offers a conceptual understanding of a rapidly evolving field, were methods used within media intelligence need to change as well. By presenting some findings from the so called CIBAS-project, we describe how Swedish organisations and companies rely on social networking structures and individual decision making as a means to increase rapid response and agile creativity. If competitive intelligence was traditionally based on insights gleaned from statistical methods, contemporary media analytics are currently faced with audiovisual data streams (sound, video, image)—often with a slant of sociality. Yet, machine learning of other media modalities than text poses a number of technical hurdles. In this article we use fashion analytics as a final case in point, taken from a commercial sector where visual big data is presently in vogue.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Snickars

Lars Degerstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: 2017 IEEE 17th International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT). : Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

It is becoming the norm that learners with their per- sonal devices take an active role through accessing, inter- preting and processing informational artifacts on the go, trans- forming them into various representational states, or creating entirely new ones. Such a development holds the potential to take learning experiences from the classroom into the real world, but also supports the educational vision of adventure learning and learning through design and creation. This challenges current learning and teaching practices, requiring new pedagogical models and different perspectives on design- ing learning experiences and appropriate technological tools. This paper discusses the theoretical assumptions and design aspects of developing a toolkit that supports adventure learn- ing. The SmartZoos project aims to design and develop a tool- set which allows teachers, but also students, to take an active role in designing location-based games, adventure trails and other challenges (quizzes, assignments, etc.) with personal mobile devices.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Terje Väljataga

Ryan DiasKai-Mikael Jää-Aro

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: CHI'17 Workshop positioning paper – Open Design at the Intersection between Making and Manufacturing. : .

Making is ubiquitous. We all make things. Or maybe we don’t. But we could. The equipment is there, the tools and the skills can be learned. The expertise and the spaces shared. However, despite popularly stated, not everyone is a maker. Who gets to participate in making and what sites and voices are excluded? This short paper provokes questions on the interest in making, the continuous notion of empowerment and demands to #failharder.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sophie Landwehr Sydow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

This paper analyses a series of events in which a discarded box found in a garbage room is examined and taken apart in the context of a makerspace. The participants' inquiry provided a rich and multifaceted experience in various settings, including puzzle-solving, exploring physical and digital materials, engaging people with different skills. The social engagements with and around the artifacts brought certain interpretative aspects to the fore. Situated acts of interpretation worked as ways of building a coherent narrative and a meaningful experience. In the paper, we highlight the relationship between on the one hand the subjects' skills and motivations to understand and make sense of the technology at hand which we call material literacy, and on the other hand the specific material qualities that encourage or trigger certain interpretations and experiences. The qualities we discuss are: opacity, risk, authenticity, uniqueness, age, and hybridity. This study allows us to reposition the contemporary understanding of makerspaces beyond that of being places for innovation and learning.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jakob Tholander

Martin JonssonSophie Landwehr Sydow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: CHI EA '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

Movement-based interaction design is increasingly popular, with application domains ranging from dance, sport, gaming to physical rehabilitation. In a workshop at CHI 2016, a set of prominent artists, game designers, and interaction designers embarked on a research journey to explore what we came to refer to as "aesthetics in soma-based design". In this follow-up workshop, we would like to take the next step, shifting from discussing the philosophical underpinnings we draw upon to explain and substantiate our practice, to form our own interaction design theory and conceptualisations. We propose that soma-based design theory needs practical, pragmatic as well as analytical study - otherwise the felt dimension will be missing. We will consider how such tacit knowledge can be articulated, documented and shared. To ground the discussion firmly in the felt experience of our own practice, the workshop is organised as a joint practical design work session, supported by analytical study.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

K. Höök

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Design journal 2017, 20 (2): 181-198.

This paper highlights the important role that design plays when it comes to women’s overall experiences of ther gynaecological examination. It exemplifies how the examination can become renegotiable through the practice of a critical design. We will reflect this in the design of the contemporary gynaecological examination chair (GEC). We used women’s experiences as a starting point for the design of an Androchair (a conceptual male equivalent of the GEC), in order to make the experiences critically visible. Inspired by the view of the gynaecological examination as a performance where the Androchair is represented as a prop and was placed on a stage as a discussion object during a public seminar. The Androchair allowed for both critical and multiple readings of the GEC and through that, the gynaecology examination at large. Moreover, it stimulated a discussion about alternative ideas towards achieving a more positive experience.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

K. Ehrnberger

Minna Räsänen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Design Studies 2017, : -.

This article draws on data from a participatory design project developing services for online youth counselling. It investigates the outcomes and contingencies of participation for stakeholders (here counsellors) and how they make sense of their experiences of participating in a design project. The findings show how counsellors involved in a participatory design process develop new skills and knowledge as their roles and work practices in the project change overtime. The study is longitudinal, following a project that stretches over a period of three years, and addresses temporal aspects of participation, and in particular what happens when the design efforts come to an end and the designed service is launched. It is found that a participatory design project that fails with respect to its explicitly stated goals may still have positive secondary outcomes due to the engagement and process of situated learning among the participants involved.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Childhood 2017, 24 (2): 260-278.

This study examines how possibilities for agency are designed into online youth counselling services, as well as how such possibilities are addressed by young prospective users during the design of the services. The data are drawn both from the design of a national website for youth clinics in Sweden and from a design project developing e-services for local youth clinics in a Swedish municipality. The agency of young users is here treated as a key concern for understanding how user empowerment is accomplished through the design of websites and e-services. Using combined research materials (i.e. two websites and focus group meetings), this study demonstrates how design features may both facilitate and restrict young people’s involvement and control over sensitive and private issues. In addition, we demonstrate how the designed possibilities for empowerment may allow young users to critically approach and effectively use such services.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ann-Carita Evaldsson

Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Nordi'CHI 2016 Workshop. Things Fall Apart: Unpacking the Temporalities of Impermanence for HCI. : .

Electronic components and computational artifacts tend to have a short lifespan. When they age, they become obsolete and lose their value and meaning. In a case where members of a makerspace investigate an old artifact with electronic components, we use the notion of forensics to describe how the lost meanings of discarded objects can be revived, and how the acts of inquiry around these objects and materials also bring new meaning to the objects at hand. This points to an alternative perspective on the transiency of electronic materials, where the focus is not on prolonging their lifespan, but rather on how such objects and materials can become meaningful after their “death”.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Martin JonssonSophie Landwehr Sydow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Challenges for the New Rurality in a Changing World: Proceedings from the 7th International Conference on Localized Agri-Food Systems. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola.

In the global North, there has been a considerable renewed interest for urban agriculture (UA) as a means to re-localize food systems by shortening food supply chains. This can be done by local food initiatives, such as community gardens. This paper is iscussing community gardens in Stockholm. We have choose to look at community gardens under the lens of neoliberal governmentality. Material has been gathered through participatory attendants on meetings, interviews and surveys. The results show that in Stockholm one can to some extent see urban gardening practices as agents of counter-neoliberal urban transformation. But also as an expression of the new rurality were the citizens desire to shorten the food chain and re connect with their food and to create new food regimes.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria NormarkMadeleine Bonow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental ScienceMedia Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: NordiCHI '16. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

Despite increasing interest, Sustainable HCI has been critiqued for doing too little, and perhaps also at times for doing the wrong things. Still, a field like Human-Computer Interaction should aim at being part of transforming our society into a more sustainable one. But how do we do that, and, what are we aiming for? With this workshop, we propose that HCI should start working with the new global Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) that were formally adopted by the UN in September 2015. How can Sustainable HCI be inspired by, and contribute to these goals? What should we in the field of HCI do more of, and what should we perhaps do less of? In what areas should we form partnerships in order to reach the Sustainable Development Goals and with whom should we partner?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

E. Eriksson

Maria Normark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

More and more people are using the internet to access various societal functions. In recent years, municipalities and private enterprises have increasingly begun to explore and develop internet-based services to support public health in general and to disseminate health information in particular. This compilation thesis consists of four articles that explore and provide different perspectives on the design and implementation of new online youth counselling services for public organisations and social services, working with counselling and health information for young people. Ethnographic methods, and materials from two empirical settings, have been used to investigate how aspects of design and participation can serve to empower both potential young users and counsellors as stakeholders in the design projects. An important secondary focus is how mechanisms of empowerment play out in the design of online counselling services targeting young people. The notion of empowerment is addressed in terms of empowerment through design, focusing on normative expectations regarding young people as users of online youth counselling, as well as how to work with norms and norm-critical perspectives in the design and development of user interfaces. Another aspect of empowerment concerns participation, here seeking an increased understanding of the processes, practices and shifting roles involved in engaging professionals and young users as participants in a design project. In order to address these interrelated areas of inquiry, an eclectic theoretical and methodological approach has been used to study design in practice. An ethnomethodological approach unpacks how the participants relate to and reflect upon the design projects under study, highlighting aspects of empowerment and user agency. In addition, a sociocultural perspective on communities of practice and participation is used to increase the understanding of what it means to be a participant in participatory design projects. The findings show how embedded social norms and values have implications for users’ identities as presented in the digital design of online youth counselling services. The findings also reveal ways in which user empowerment is facilitated but also restricted by the design of youth counselling e-services, including not only the designed multimodal features of such services, but also the norms that guide usage. The studies also address the outcomes of technological change and the implementation of sociotechnical systems and services for the professionals involved in design projects. Here the studies provide knowledge about the forms of practical reasoning the counsellors engage in when anticipating work-related issues associated with the new technology and how they might deal with potential challenges. Finally, the findings show how participation in a design project may enable the development of new forms of communities of practice in which the participants and their roles and participation status change as the organisation changes.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ann-Carita Evaldsson

Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: AcademicMindtrek'16. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

Embodiment is used to denote the sense that something is a part of one's body. The sense of own body is argued to relate to the sense of agency of one's own actions and of the ownership of the body. In this sense of own body can incorporate something external to the body, such as simple tools or virtual hands. The premise of the study is that the player-characters and game controllers get embodied in a similar to a tool or a virtual hand. In order to study embodiment, a psychometric scale is developed using explorative factor analysis (n=104). The scale is evaluated with two sets of data (n=103 and n=89) using confirmatory factor analysis. The embodiment scale ended to having two dimensions: controller ownership and player-character embodiment. Finally, the embodiment scale is tested and put into action in two studies with hypotheses 1) embodiment and players' skills correlate and 2) the sense of presence and embodiment correlate. The data (n=37 and n=31) analysed using mixed effects models support both hypotheses.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Text & Talk 2016, 36 (6): 705-731.

The present study examines a set of discussions among professional counselors in the area of youth counseling, as they participate in the development and design of an online video-mediated communication platform. With an overarching interest in how participatory design is performed through conversations, the analysis focuses on analogical reasoning through which the envisaged system is anchored to existing technologies and work practices. Three forms of analogical reasoning are identified: formulating design alternatives; challenging problem formulations; and telling stories. In various ways, these forms of analogical reasoning inform the ongoing design decision-making process, where the hypothetical technology and its organizational and work-related implications are evaluated. The study contributes to how analogical reasoning is done in interaction, and places the findings in the context of participatory design and studies of design reasoning.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gustav Lymer

Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: MOCO '16. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

We often take for granted that we have immediate access to our perception and experience of and through our bodies. But inward listening is a demanding activity and thus not easy to learn to perform or design for. With the Sarka mat we want to support the ability to direct attention by providing sound feedback linked to the weight distribution and motion intensity of different parts of the body, and to provide an exemplar for how such design may be conducted. The process of Sarka's creation is informed by Somaesthetic Appreciation Design. We discuss how a sonic feedback signal can influence listeners, followed by how we, in this design, worked to navigate the complex design space presented to us. We detail the design process involved, and the very particular set of limitations which this interactive sonification presented.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

I. Bergström

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Challenges for the New Rurality in a Changing World. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola.

Over the last decades a great effort for rural development policies in Sweden has been to find windows of opportunity for the future, to promote new types of enterprises, to support farm and firm diversification, to identify novel business models and in general promote growth. But while many concrete measures have focused on lowering the entry barriers to the market and support the supply side of the rural economy, a glimpse on the emerging technological paradigm, e.g. internet based development and social technologies, indicates that new solutions are possible. In this article we address the following question: Can Alternative Food Networks (AFNs) in combination with social technologies promote rural entrepreneurship and economic growth?   

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Paulina RytkönenLars Degerstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Meal SciencesMedia Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation - TENOR2016. Cambridge, UK : .

In this paper, we present and discuss S-notation for sample-based music, and particularly for DJ scratching and turntablism. Sonnenfeld developed S-notation based on his Theory of Motion where scratch music is seen as constructions of concurrent musical gestures (motion parameters), and not only turntable actions. The detailed symbolic notation was inspired by traditional musical notation, and among its advantages it covers current musical needs, it can be read and played live in performance, it provides a tool for composers to convey musical ideas, it can be expanded towards new styles and techniques, and it is generalizable to other types of sample-based music. In addition to motion parameters, the new notation system involves an analysis of the sampled sound. Finally, S-notation is also applicable for documenting and for teaching situations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Alexander Sonnenfeld

Kjetil Falkenberg Hansen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. (Working Paper ; 2016:2)

The aim of the presented work has been to investigate how the existing concept of social CI can be used to support collaborative CI networks. A novel socio-technical solution CoCI consisting of a work method and tool have been designed for a scenario with an internal network of collaborative competitive intelligence (CI). The CoCI work method suggests using agile, freeform collaboration through an informal organizational network. A distinction is made between the roles of network coordinators, contributors, clients and receivers. The work style follows regular temporal iterative loops, or sprints, each one ending in some form of intelligence outcome. The CoCI tool supports collaborative daily work with reading, commenting and classifying incoming material, where the actions of the network members are visible to each other. Furthermore, the CoCI tool supports having meetings using the tool where incoming material from the sprint is reviewed and a report is created. In the evaluation of the tool, the dimensions engagement, collaboration and community had high scores. In contrast, the dimension simplicity was less satisfactory. Four design patterns for social CI could be extracted based on the strong points of the evaluation: social selection, individual/collective box, real-time engagement and collaborative enhancement. The low score on simplicity will be investigated further, but indicates how crucial it is for social features to be intuitive in order to avoid making the overall solution too complex.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Cecilia Hermansson

Lars Degerstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. (Working Paper ; 2016:1)

The presented research has investigated empirically the current practices of how organizations are using CI today, and in particular what role collaboration and networking plays in such CI work processes. In particular, the investigation has examined what forms of collaborations and organizational networks are currently used in the CI work process. Four organizations have been examined as exploratory case studies. From this, a base model for social CI has been generated by extracting overall CI process characteristics from the investigated cases that relate to collaborative behavior and organizational networking. The study relies on the existing conceptual framework called the social CI framework intended for analysis and design of CI for the (socially) networking organization.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Degerstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Oxford Handbook of Screendance Studies. New York : Oxford University Press, 2016. 303-320.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pia Tikka

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: TEI '16 Proceedings of the TEI '16. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

In this paper we discuss the design process and results from a design exploration on the use of thermal stimuli in body awareness exercises. A user-study was performed on an interactive prototype in the form of an interactive heat mat. The paper brings forth an alternative understanding of heat as a design material that extends the common understanding of thermal stimuli in HCI as a communication modality to instead bring the aesthetic and experiential properties to the fore. Findings account for felt body experiences of thermal stimuli and a number of design qualities related to heat as a design material are formulated, pointing to experiential qualities concerning the felt body, subjectivity and subtleness as well as material qualities concerning materiality, inertia and heat transfer.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Ståhl

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business 2015, 5 (3): 5-34.

 This article introduces the notion of social competitive intelligence, meaning competitive intelligence (CI) for the networking organization. A novel socio-technical framework called the Social CI Framework (SCIF) is presented, intended for analysis and design of social CI processes, methods and tools. By using a socio-technical perspective, both social and technical aspects are considered together in SCIF. The framework is founded on a theory related to enterprise 2.0 and wikinomics, and is intended to be used to study social CI using principles such as openness, participation, sharing and co-creation. The presented results are based on a literature review and an exploratory study with interviews of CI experts from Swedish organizations. SCIF explicitly distinguishes between task-oriented models and collaboration models, and models of different socio-technical perspectives. Moreover, SCIF uses the mechanisms of socio-technical themes and a socio-technical value map that relate the theoretical and empirical characteristics with the SCIF modeling method.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Degerstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: KTH Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 2015. Stockholm : KTH.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Kjetil Falkenberg HansenMaria Normark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: On website for workshop "The Future of Making: Where Industrial and Personal Fabrication Meet". : .

Maker and DIY cultures, as well as the trend towards personal fabrication have gained recent visibility in HCI research. While first reflecting on makers as a new user and “social actor”, current rhetoric has shifted towards the maker movement’s potential for empowerment and democratization. By focusing on places and the organization of personal fabrication we are drawing lines between amateur vs. professional, and home vs. work settings as well as leisure vs. educational motivations. Here we discuss and map out the characteristics of semi-professional places for making in the light of a small study from a hackathon event.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Martin JonssonSophie Landwehr Sydow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2015. (Working Paper ; 2015:3)

This article introduces the notion of social competitive intelligence, meaning competitive intelligence (CI) for the networking organization. A novel socio-technical framework called the Social CI Framework (SCIF) is presented, intended for analysis and design of social CI processes, methods and tools. By using a socio-technical perspective, both social and technical aspects are considered together in SCIF. The framework is founded on theory related to enterprise 2.0 and wikinomics, and is intended to be used to study social CI using principles such as openness, participation, sharing and co-creation. The presented results are based on a literature review and an exploratory study with interviews of CI experts from Swedish organizations. SCIF explicitly distinguishes between task-oriented models and collaboration models, and models of different socio-technical perspectives. Moreover, SCIF uses the mechanisms of socio-technical themes and a socio-technical value map that relate the theoretical and empirical characteristics with the SCIF modeling method.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Degerstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: CeDEM Asia 2014. Münster : .

This study explored the attitudes of a broad sample of politically interested Swedish voters towards Internet voting. A total of 5683 participants completed a web-based survey concerning participation and security aspects of Internet voting. Attitudes towards Internet voting were positive on the whole and the acceptance of participation in democratic elections using Internet voting was spearheaded by: women, groups with relatively short education, the unemployed and the self-employed. Unlike previous studies, it was found that age was not a significant factor in determining the attitudes towards participation in elections by means of Internet voting. Concerning the security challenges of Internet voting, men were more optimistic than women and participants’ confidence in security increased with age and education length.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Georg Stenberg

Mauri Kaipainen

Montathar Faraon


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: Game Research Methods. : ETC Press, 2015. 1-8.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Staffan Björk

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: Game Research Methods. : ETC Press, 2015. 23-35.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Staffan Björk

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

: ETC Press, 2015.

Games are increasingly becoming the focus for research due to their cultural and economic impact on modern society. However, there are many different types of approaches and methods than can be applied to understanding games or those that play games. This book provides an introduction to various game research methods that are useful to students in all levels of higher education covering both quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods. In addition, approaches using game development for research is described. Each method is described in its own chapter by a researcher with practical experience of applying the method to topic of games. Through this, the book provides an overview of research methods that enable us to better our understanding on games.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Staffan Björk

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: Applications of Geometric Knowledge Representation. Dordrecht : Springer, 2015. 245-258.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Antti Hautamäki

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: Neuroscience and Media. : Routledge, 2015. 76-88.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pia Tikka

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Expanding Practices in Audiovisual Narrative. Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014. 105-128.

The dilemma of designing interactive narrative media is how to empower the participants to tell the author’s story from their own point of view, yet in a structured manner. We propose a solution by means of associating story elements with metadata that constitute a story ontospace. It is defined by multiple narrative dimensions each of which follow one meaningful aspect of the story. The spectator can choose a perspective, which is essentially a prioritization among the narrative dimensions. This is formalized as a projection of the story space onto a uniquely apparent landscape, to which each dimension contributes to the chosen degree. The straightest trajectory through this landscape corresponds to a perspective-relative narrative path that always follows a coherent sequence. This model and its algorithmic implementation will be demonstrated with a database- adaptation of a typical cinema plot. Re-narrated examples generated by the model can be intuitively evaluated by the reader.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Roberto Pugliese

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Cinéma & cie : international film studies journal 2014, XIV (22-23): -.

Film narratives are intrinsically time-dependent designs. This article proposes a model of narrative nowness, based on Husserl's concepts of retention and protention on one hand, and Francisco Varela's neurophenomenological exploration of time consciousness on the other, relating this further to narrative experience and its neural epiphenomena. Only recently has brain research been equipped with the possibility of dealing with temporal frames relevant for time consciousness in the scope of whole narratives. The study of cinema using neuroscientific methods and insights is referred to as neurocinematics. We promote neurocinematics as a complementary method of traditional film research, rather than an approach of brain sciences in general. Neurocinematic methods may provide film studies with new tools for re-evaluating established filmmaking conventions and developing new ways to study, for instance, the film viewer's experience and related aspects of time consciousness.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pia Tikka

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

eJournal of eDemocracy & Open Government 2014, 6 (3): 231-247.

This study aimed to examine differences in influence between online news (e.g., New York Times) and social networking sites (e.g., Facebook and Twitter) on attitudes in political campaigns. In a web-based experiment, campaign, polls and election between two fictitious candidates were simulated. Participants’ explicit and implicit attitudes as well as voting behavior were assessed using self-report items and the Implicit Association Test (IAT). The results reveal that information emanating from online news had a significant influence on explicit and implicit attitudes while that of social networking sites did not. Overall, negative items had a stronger impact than positive ones, more so in online news compared to social networking sites. Negative information from either type of media was more likely to change participants’ explicit attitudes in a negative direction and as a consequence also change their vote. Practical implications of the findings and limitations of the study are discussed.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Georg Stenberg

Mauri Kaipainen

Montathar Faraon


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: 27th IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems. Los Alamitos, California : IEEE Computer Society.

In this paper we explore the use of a mobile video-conferencing tool (MVCT) in advanced home care of children. We present the results from a qualitative study where we have evaluated mobile video communication between the patient's home and the hospital unit. Our results show that mobile video enhances communication between home care teams and medical staff at the unit, makes more effective use of practitioners' time and that the equipment have additional values for staff that extend beyond video communication. Challenges identified are related to technical problems, limitations in the MVCT's design and the concern that the inability to handle problems may affect health care professionals' role as an authority. The benefits of the MVCT rely to a great extent on individual users' creativity and the willingness of key actors in the organization's management to find ways of improving the present home care format.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

J. Fredriksson

Minna Räsänen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 4th International conference applied linguistics and professional practice. : ALAPP.

The availability of online resources for youth counselling has increased in later years, posing a number of new challenges for existing practices and practitioners. Previous research on online youth counselling has addressed the changing conditions for professionals as well as for the young clients (Danby et al., 2009; 2011; Harris et al., 2012) but has not previously examined the processes through which the services are developed. In this study we follow a participatory design project in the development of a youth counselling e-service in Sweden. The study provides an ethnomethodologically informed analysis of how a group of counsellors discuss possible socio-technical dilemmas created by the introduction of web-based video-mediated counselling. As the analyses demonstrate, the planned implementation is met by the counsellors with extensive hypothetical reasoning. The counsellors draw on various experiences from the existing work practice, experiences of distance interaction with clients via telephone and chat as well as face-to-face meetings. With the help of these resources the counsellors provide reasoned accounts of envisaged problems connected with the combination of visual access and physical distance introduced by the video-link. Two issues in particular are topicalized: the problem of ‘dirty calls’ where callers engage counsellors in talk about sexual issues as a means of self-gratification; and the issue of suicide threats. The specific problems of the video-link are made salient through contrasts with face-to-face meetings as well as with telephone calls. Three main methods of addressing hypothetical problems can be discerned: first, normalizing the articulated problem by minimizing the difference between the new technology and existing practice (e.g. suggesting that Skype conversations can be ended in the same way as telephone calls); second, proposing conversational strategies in which referring to technological malfunction can be used as a resource for ending unpleasant calls or disabling the problematic video-link; third, defining and limiting the particular circumstances in which the video-link is to be used. Some general conclusions that can be drawn are that the practitioners use experiences from their current practices both to hypothesize about problems and create strategies for solutions. In different ways, these strategies work to bring the hypothetical new environment in line with existing work practices.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gustav Lymer

Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2014, 8 : 794-.

Mainstream cognitive neuroscience has begun to accept the idea of embodied mind, which assumes that the human mind is fundamentally constituted by the dynamical interactions of the brain, body, and the environment. In today’s paradigm of naturalistic neurosciences, subjects are exposed to rich contexts, such as video sequences or entire films, under relatively controlled conditions, against which researchers can interpret changes in neural responses within a time window. However, from the point of view of radical embodied cognitive neuroscience, the increasing complexity alone will not suffice as the explanatory apparatus for dynamical embodiment and situatedness of the mind. We suggest that narrative enactive systems with dynamically adaptive content as stimuli,may serve better to account for the embodied mind engaged with the surrounding world. Among the ensuing challenges for neuroimaging studies is how to interpret brain data against broad temporal contexts of previous experiences that condition the unfolding experience of nowness. We propose means to tackle this issue, as well as ways to limit the exponentially growing combinatoria of narrative paths to a controllable number.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pia Tikka

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology 2014, 6 (2): 223-241.

In this paper we focus on interaction design as the practice of designing interactive and digital products, services, systems and/or environments. Of interest in the area of interaction design is people’s use of designed things, which also makes it relevant to relate interaction design to the social norms present in society, such as gendered norms. We present three different cases in which we have analyzed different aspects of interface design and put a specific focus on interaction design as a carrier of social and gendered norms. The first case concerns a qualitative study of how young girls interact with and present themselves in a photo blog website. The second case is a study of the way that young women entrepreneurs use the functionality of social media to mold an attractive online persona (an invented, or adjusted, character that one wants to put forward). The third case is based on a study of the development of the national youth counseling site in Sweden. By using the concepts of interference and social norms as analytic tools, we exemplify various ways in which social norms, such as gender norms, diversity, power relations, equality, marginalization, etc. are part of interaction design and how the interface design reinforces norms and provides a far from neutral arena. In this paper, gender is highlighted in relation to social norms and values in society and social expectations and hierarchies. On the basis of our findings from the three different cases, we argue that there is a need to unpack how digital design embeds gender norms and to demonstrate how the relationship between norms and design can be critically examined.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria NormarkSofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 5th Workshop on Computational Models of Narrative : CMN'14, July 31–August 2, 2014. Saarbrücken/Wadern : Dagstuhl Publishing.

Cognitive neurosciences have made significant progress in learning about brain activity in situatedcognition, thanks to adopting stimuli that simulate immersion in naturalistic conditions insteadof isolated artificial stimuli. In particular, the use of films in neuroscientific experiments, aparadigm often referred to as neurocinematics, has contributed to this success. The use ofcinematic stimuli, however, has also revealed a fundamental shortcoming of neuroimaging studies:The lack of conceptual and methodological means to handle the viewers' experience of narrativeevents in their temporally extended contexts in the scale of full cinematic narrative, not tomention life itself. In order to give a conceptual structure to the issue of temporal contexts,we depart from the neurophenomenological approach to time consciousness by neurobiologistFrancisco Varela, which in turn builds on Husserl's phenomenology of time. More specifically, wewill discuss the experience of narrative tension, determined by backward-looking conceptualizingretention, and forward-looking anticipatory protention. Further, this conceptual structure isbuilt into a preliminary mathematical model, simulating the dynamics of decaying and refreshingmemory traces that aggregates a retentive perspective for each moment of nowness, which in turnmay trigger anticipations for coming events, in terms of Varela and Husserl, protentions. Thepresent tentative mathematical model is constructed using simple placeholder functions, with theintention that they would eventually be replaced by models based on empirical observations onthe psychological capabilities that support narrative sensemaking. The final goal is a model thatsuccessfully simulates the way how the memory system maintains narrative tension beyond thetransient nowness window, and thereby allows mappings to observed brain activity with a richtemporal system of narrative contexts.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Janne Kauttonen

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the 2014 IEEE 15th International Conference on Information Reuse and Integration. Piscataway, NJ, USA : IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society (SMC).

The aim of this study was to examine closer the conflicting results from previous studies concerning the relation- ship between Facebook use and self-esteem using the Facebook Intensity Scale and Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale (N = 107). In line with some previous studies, our data confirmed that there is a relationship between Facebook usage and self-esteem, but the applied scales allowed a more refined assessment of it. The results showed, after controlling for demographic variables, that participants with low Facebook intensity reported on average higher self-esteem than those who did not use Facebook or those with high Facebook intensity, while those with medium Facebook intensity had significantly higher self-esteem compared to the participants with high Facebook intensity. Future studies should address the underlying causal relations using a time-bound observation method.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mauri Kaipainen

Montathar Faraon


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York : ACM Press.

The EcoFriends application was developed as an attempt tosupport grocery shopping adjusted to vegetables’seasonality through a performative approach to interactionand interactive applications. The design aimed at criticalreflection and inspiration among users, rather thanachieving a certain kind of persuasion. This guided thepractical design to be modelled around open-endednessand social voices to challenge ideas and points of view. Weargue that research addressing design for interactions aboutvalue-laden concepts such as sustainable action need tofind ways of supporting various knowledge discourses, bydistinguishing between performative and representationaltechnologies. The approach allowed us to identify anumber of design challenges regarding interactivetechnology and interaction design in relation to aspects ofknowledge and truth, trust, negotiation and responsibility.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jakob Tholander

Maria Normark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: CaTaC’14: Culture, Technology, Communication: Celebration, Transformation, New Directions [online proceening]. : .

In this paper we argue for the need of a methodological framework for analysing the design of websites from a norm-critical perspective. Identifying some issues and challenges in previous studies on norms and values in interface design we suggest an approach for analysing norms in websites and user interfaces based on sociological and cultural perspectives on design. Approaching norms in interface design we understand design in terms of resources for interaction, involving four aspects of interaction: cultural representations, technology, interactivity, and context.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Fatima Jonsson

Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: SIDER’14 Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden, April 11-12, 2014.. : .

This paper is built on a study that intends to develop a method by creating a set of tools based on selected parts from critical design and critical design theory. The goals of these tools are to function as instruments enabling practical implementation of critical design in a design and/or production process. In this study we develop the tools for critical design work and test our tools in a specific production process of a music video to explore how to apply critical design practically. Indoing so we used design-oriented research methods. By bringing together critical design perspectives and the practice of video production, this study wishes to contribute to the work of bridging the gap between theory and practice in critical design.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Adrian Faber

Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal Simulation & Gaming 2014, 45 (1): 41-69.

We report research on player modeling using psychophysiology and machine learning, conducted through interdisciplinary collaboration between researchers of computer science, psychology, and game design at Aalto University, Helsinki. First, we propose the Play Patterns And eXperience (PPAX) framework to connect three levels of game experience that previously had remained largely unconnected: game design patterns, the interplay of game context with player personality or tendencies, and state-of-the-art measures of experience (both subjective and non-subjective). Second, we describe our methodology for using machine learning to categorize game events to reveal corresponding patterns, culminating in an example experiment. We discuss the relation between automatically detected event clusters and game design patterns, and provide indications on how to incorporate personality profiles of players in the analysis. This novel interdisciplinary collaboration combines basic psychophysiology research with game design patterns and machine learning, and generates new knowledge about the interplay between game experience and design.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Benjamin Cowley

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: CHI '13 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Syste. New York : ACM Press.

Motivated by a need in sustainable HCI for studies of everyday practices, and a belief that a holistic view on sustainability is crucial to deeper understanding of how to design ICT to support sustainability, we here present a qualitative study of 11 simple living families in the US. Simple living refers to a lifestyle which is voluntarily simple out of concern for both the environment and quality of life. Our goal was to learn about a holistic view on sustainability and the role of ICT in helping and hindering families to live simply. The study contributes new insights about how holistic sustainability could be a valuable lens for HCI, revealing that sustainability is important to a wider range of areas in HCI than previously discussed. We conclude with implications for HCI for how to support sustainable practices beyond being "about" being green.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Maria Håkansson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation. Wisbaden : Springer, 2013. 191-214.

Teaching opera places high demands on audio-visual and physical aspects of the teaching situation and represents a small but internationally widespread and travel-dependent labour and education market. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential for establishing a video option and thereby reducing travel. A trial with opera master classes at a distance was carried out between Stockholm and Helsinki and the reactions of students and teachers were charted. The trial showed satisfactory lesson quality and keen interest among participants in gaining continuous access to this kind of distance education, mainly because of a strong mutual demand for renowned teachers and talented students. The study also investigated teaching under normal conditions (without an option for teaching at a distance). It was found that under both normal and trial conditions, the personal motivation of participants to participate in master classes was characterized by elements of desire and necessity. The desire component was linked to the aesthetic, creative and cooperative aspects of the art form and learning context, while the necessity component related to livelihood and career paths. A survey of the travel habits of some teachers and students indicated a relatively high frequency of travel by air or car to other regions and countries to participate in teaching etc., especially for the teachers. In light of these findings, introduction of technology for master classes and other similar teaching at a distance, e.g. between two or more Nordic opera colleges, could partially replace travel for teaching, but could also lead to more teaching of this kind, since it is in such a high demand. Overall positive environmental effects as well as positive effects on the quality of education could be expected by supplementing face-to-face with video-mediated teaching.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Greger Heriksson

Minna Räsänen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 2013, 20 (5): 31-.

People's domestic habits are increasingly being targeted to reduce levels of CO2 emissions. Whereas domestic energy consumption has received a lot of attention with several reported studies on sustainable practices, there are very few studies on workplace practices. Nevertheless, these are considered as having much potential for reducing energy consumption. This article presents the findings from two field studies where two different types of prototypes for visualizing energy use were designed, implemented and evaluated in different types of workplace settings - factories and offices. The studies used design probes to explore how visual feedback for electricity use was interpreted and acted upon by employees in work settings. A striking observation was that it is very difficult to get people to change to more pro-environmental behavior and practices in a workplace environment. The article discusses why this might be the case.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Cecilia Katzeff

Minna Räsänen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Advances in Computer Entertainment. Cham : Springer.

This pilot study looks at how the formal features of character-driven games can be used to explain player-character engagement. Questionnaire data (N=206), formal game features (in 11 games), and ordinal regression were used in the analysis. The results show that interactive dialogue and cut-scenes showing the romances between the player-character and another character relates to higher character engagement scores, while romance modeling and friendship modeling relate to lower character engagement scores.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: Academic Mindtrek 2013. New York : ACM Press.

What are the elements that affect story interestingness or consistency in single-player videogames? The question is approached by comparing player evaluations (N=206) of 11 videogames against a set of features derived by formal (qualitative) analysis. Ordinal regression was used to analyze the collected data. The study posits that dialogue system, romance, moral choice, appearance customization, and support for different play styles relate to story evaluation. Females tend to judge game stories more favorably and those with doctoral degree less favorably than players with other education.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Science, Technology and Human Values 2013, 38 (5): 655-677.

This article looks at some common assumptions and associated work practices within a military intelligence community. There intelligence practitioners use the term raw data as a common sense category, as a word that describes information they want or have gained access to. The practical and organizational processes that inform the construction of the term raw data are unpacked here. Examples presented are based on interviews, field observations, and document reviews. Theoretical descriptions and models of work, for example, the intelligence cycle, construction, and the use of computer databases, assume that work in this community starts with raw data. However, this data has already been (prior) processed by the work practices, political, practical, and other decisions even before data collection occurs. The technology and attendant categories and practices instrumentalize a certain world view. The model used frames not just the collection and organization of the institution's knowledge but those categories that inform how this institution organizes, legitimizes, and enacts its work, data, and knowledge. Given the kinds of opponents nations have to face today, intelligence practitioners and those who study their work have to understand practice, action, and contexts often quite different from ones own.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

James M. Nyce

Minna Räsänen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Cleaner Production 2013, 41 : 126-139.

Transportation, or rather access, is a major challenge in relation to achieving environmental goals and in striving for sustainable development. One potential means suggested to decrease the environmental impact related to accessibility is mediated meetings. However, few studies have quantified the potential environmental impacts with a life cycle perspective. With inspiration from a project involving four major Swedish media companies experiencing an increasing need for business travel and decreasing resources, this study assessed the potential greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and cumulative energy demand (CED) related to different types of business meetings, using a life cycle perspective. The potential consequences for emissions of GHG and CED in two hypothetical companies introducing mediated meetings were also assessed. The results indicated that mediated meetings using personal computers can reduce GHG emissions and CED per meeting and that more advanced mediated solutions are preferable to meetings which require travel, if the equipment is frequently used to replace travel. However, advanced technology that is under-used may give similar or higher GHG emissions and CED than meetings traveled to by train. All mediated meeting alternatives studied here had lower GHG emissions and CED than meetings which required travel by plane or car. LCD screen manufacture contributed the main environmental impact of mediated meetings, but the meeting rooms needed, electricity use for equipment and internet use for data transmission were also important in some cases. As LCD screen manufacture and internet energy use were main issues and as the data on these issues are uncertain, they should be further assessed+ and updated in future studies. Introduction of mediated meetings in companies and organizations should involve a thorough consideration of needs and possible solutions to achieve the best possible environmental benefits through efficient use and replacement of travel. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Clara Borggren

Minna Räsänen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: CeDEM13. Krems : Edition Donau-Universität Krems.

The purpose of the current paper is to contribute to the field of e-participation by presenting a design concept for mediating technology that incorporates current information technology such as social and collaborative media designed for the purposes of civic engagement in society. Such technology could empower people to mobilize and engage themselves in proactive consensus-seeking and co-creation. Social media are broadly adopted in the reactive mobilization of citizen-initiated participatory activity in society such as protests like the London riots and the Occupy movements. In our view, there is a demand to organize mobilized crowds to collaborate in a consensus-seeking manner. For instance, there does not yet exist online applications that specifically serve the purposes of massive simultaneous co-editing of documents by citizens seeking consensus in societal issues. However, as we argue, there is no reason for such not to be integrated from existing technological components that are commonly accessible.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Victor Villavicencio

Mauri Kaipainen

Montathar Faraon


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: Nu vill jag prata!. Stockholm : Stockholms universitets förlag, 2013. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of 97th Information Science and Music (SIGMUS) Research Conference. Tokyo : Information Processing Society of Japan.

In this paper we introduce an application for tablet devices with Android operating system called The Music Puzzle.This work is part of an ongoing projectcalled The Soundparkï¿œUsing modern smartphones to create interactive listening experiences for hearing impaired. In the Soundpark, we intend to provide different experimental applications for interacting with sound. The aim of the presented study was to create interactive and game-inspired listening experiences for persons with hearing impairmens (and possibly using hearing aids or having cochlea implants). Audio-based programs constitute a significant part of the Android market, but the scopes of existing applications are limited. Modern smart devices open up new possibilities both in terms of usingexternal information as input and providing real-time audio feedback to the user, and the Music Puzzle has a novel approach that explores the new possibilities.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Zheng Li

Kjetil Falkenberg Hansen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Feminist Materialisms – Gender, Nature, Body, Materiality, Copenhagen, April 26-27,2012.. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Martin JonssonSofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: i-COME international conference on communication and media 2012. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ester AppelgrenGunnar NygrenHelge Hüttenrauch

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental StudiesSchool of Social Sciences
JournalismMedia Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: Digital Humanities Congress 2012, The University of Sheffield. Sheffield : HRI Online Publications.

Data journalism is a form of storytelling where elements of text, interactive graphics and datasets are often combined into one interactive journalistic project or service. In addition, the general public are often encouraged to submit their own data for publication within the service. Data journalism is not a new field, but due to the expensive production process and the advanced skills needed by journalists, it is still relatively uncommon in the Swedish media landscape. This study is based on a joint research project together with SVT Pejl, the data journalism department at the Sveriges television (SVT). The main aim of this paper is to explore this emerging form of interactive journalism based on public sector data, and how the general public engages with it. This paper is based on a four-month case study in 2011 and 2012 of SVT Pejl and “Brottspejl”one of its data journalism services. An action research approach has been used, and the methods were in-depth interviews and a web-based survey.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ester AppelgrenGunnar NygrenHelge Hüttenrauch

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental StudiesSchool of Social Sciences
JournalismMedia Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Journal of technology in human services 2012, 30 (3-4): 250-261.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andra Siibak

Michael Forsman

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and EducationSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media TechnologyMedia and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katja Grufberg

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Making Sense Through Design, NordiCHI ’12 ACM. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria NormarkSofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Computer Supported Cooperative Work 2012, 21 (6): 591-596.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Normark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: CHI '12 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Chiara Rossitto

Jakob Tholander

Maria Normark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Journal of Design 2012, 6 (3): 85-98.

This article highlights how a gender perspective can be performed by design as critical practice. Two common household appliances – a drill and a hand blender – were used as a starting point. Inspired by Derrida’s term deconstruction, the product language of the tools was analysed and then switched in two new prototypes: the hand blender Mega Hurricane Mixer and the drill Dolphia. The prototypes were shown at exhibitions and lectures. The comments by the audience show that a switching of product language entails that their relationship to the artefact itself also changes. Overall, the elements, which previously had been perceived as ‘lacking transparency’, were now visible. For example, the drill was identified as a "drill for women" and considered inadequate for drilling, and the mixer revealed needs and functions that the traditional mixer did not satisfy. This implies that design should not only be seen as ‘final products’ but as a part of a social process that takes place between the user, the artefact and the norms of society. By switching the product languages it was possible to highlight how gender values are connected to each design and each artefact. This means that the design of the artefacts around us is not fixed, but can be renegotiated and situated in time, place, and context.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Karin Ehrnberger

Minna Räsänen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Nordicom Information 2012, 34 (3-4): 81-88.

 Computer assisted reporting (CAR). Datadriven journalism. Databasjournalistik. Datajournalistik.Det finns många namn på den växande genre inom undersökande journalistik som använder statistisk analys, datorstödd textanalys och olika typer av grafisk visualisering. Detta område har varit föremål för ett samarbete mellan forskare vid Södertörns högskola och Pejlredaktionen vid Sveriges Television (SVT) under 2011/12. Syftet med samarbetet har varit att utveckla kunskap om arbetsmetoder inom datajournalistik och om publikens användning av den. Projektet har haft stöd från den statliga forskningsstiftelsen Vinnova, och går från hösten 2012 över i en ny fas där ytterligare sju medieföretag ska vara med under en tvåårsperiod.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ester AppelgrenGunnar NygrenHelge Hüttenrauch

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental StudiesSchool of Social Sciences
JournalismMedia Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

International Journal of Role-playing 2012, 3 : 18-32.

The article proposes that the theories of grounded cognition and embodiment can be utilized in explaining the role-playing experience. Embodied cognition theories assume that cognition is not only a feature of the brain, but the body as a whole and it’s interaction with the environment  it operates in. Grounded cognition proposes that an action, perceiving an action, and thinking about an action rely on the same processes. Moreover, knowledge is inseparably grounded to bodily states and modalities. Based on the grounded cognition theory and especially embodiment, we argue the character immersion and bleed are natural consequences on how the brain works. Also we illustrate how the operation of  simulators explain some of the central features in the creation of fiction and it’s similarities to our everyday experiences. In general, grounded cognition provides a rather simple explanation how fiction is experienced as in this theoretical framework action and thinking about an action largely utilize the same brain mechanics and so are phenomenally similar.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Simo Järvelä

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2012, 6 : 298-.

We outline general theoretical and practical implications of what we promote as enactive cinema for the neuroscientific study of online socio-emotional interaction. In a real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) setting, participants are immersed in cinematic experiences that simulate social situations. While viewing, their physiological reactions - including brain responses - are tracked, representing implicit and unconscious experiences of the on-going social situations. These reactions, in turn, are analysed in real-time and fed back to modify the cinematic sequences they are viewing while being scanned. Due to the engaging cinematic content, the proposed setting focuses on living-by in terms of shared psycho-physiological epiphenomena of experience rather than active coping in terms of goal-oriented motor actions. It constitutes a means to parametrically modify stimuli that depict social situations and their broader environmental contexts. As an alternative to studying the variation of brain responses as a function of a priori fixed stimuli, this method can be applied to survey the range of stimuli that evoke similar responses across participants at particular brain regions of interest.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pia Tikka

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

: , 2012. ( ; )

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ana Graviz

Mats Nilsson

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and EducationSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
EducationMedia Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Cultural Attitudes towards Technology and Communication 2012. Murdoch : Murdoch University.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andra Siibak

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Invisible girl. Umeå : Umeå university, 2012. 225-234.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Educational Technology & Society 2012, 15 (3): 262-274.

New approaches to emergent learner-directed learning design can be strengthened with a theoretical framework that considers learning as a dynamic process. We propose an approach that models a learning process using a set of spatial concepts: learning space, position of a learner, niche, perspective, step, path, direction of a step and step gradient. A learning process is presented as a path within a niche (or between niches) in a learning space, which consists of a certain number of steps leading the learner from the initial position to a target position in the dynamically changing learning space. When deciding on steps, the learner can take guidance from learning paths that are effective from a viewpoint of the learning community.Copyright by the International Forum of Educational Technology & Society (IFETS)

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Peeter Normak

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: The Philosophy of Computer Games. Dordrecht : Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2012. 39-55.

How players experience games emotionally is the central question in this essay. The answer varies and depends on the game. Yet, most of the actions in games are goal-driven. Cognitive emotion theories propose that goal status appraisals and emotions are connected, and this connection is used to formulate how goal-driven engagement works in the games. For example, fear is implied when the player’s goal of keeping the player character alive is under threat. This goal-driven engagement is not enough to explain all the emotions involved in gameplay. Empathy, reacting emotionally to an emotional expression is a potential source of emotions in character-based games. As such, the visual beauty of the environment and character can be pleasurable. Lastly, sounds and music can modulate the emotions of the player. For example, loud and fast music tend to correlate with emotions with high arousal. The emotional experience of playing is an amalgam of these different sources. Importantly, the emotional experience is not straightforwardly caused by the game but it depends on the players’ appraisal of the situation in the game.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: CHI '12 Proceedings of the 2012 ACM annual conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York : ACM Press.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ylva Fernaeus

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

The design and development of commercial AAA videogames is a difficult and complex endeavor. It involves large development teams that together aim to create high quality, entertaining games that sell well. Up to now, very few scholars have documented or problematized this practice. This thesis presents a study of the design practices in big game development studios that make commercial AAA videogames. The study focuses on the so called ideation part of videogame development, in which the design ideas are generated, developed and communicated in the work team. The primary data comes from interviews conducted with seven Swedish game developers, but a large quantity of secondary data has also been used. The study shows that the design practice in many studios is to focus on the player experience instead of game features. To secure the intended player experience, the studios have moved away from "big design up front" in the form of classical game design documents, and are instead using a variety of verbal, visual and audial tools to articulate and communicate their vision of the game-to-be. In the thesis, I coin the term lodestars to denote these articulations of the main game concept and the intended player experience. I then move on to describe, exemplify and categorize them. The main purpose of lodestars is to allow everyone in the development team to make design choices in line with a commonly shared design vision in order to create a unified player experience.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristina Höök

Ulf Hagen


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Lund : Studentlitteratur, 2012.

PHP är ett av de ledande programmeringsspråken för webbutveckling. Det är ett flexibelt och enkelt språk som används för att skapa dynamiska webbplatser. Denna bok ger en lättillgänglig och komplett introduktion till PHP. Läsaren får den kunskap som behövs för att snabbt komma igång och skapa egna webbapplikationer. Boken erbjuder stöd i det egna arbetet, möjligheter till fördjupning och ger en beskrivning av allt från installation av PHP till felsökning av programmeringskod. Bokens pedagogiska framställning kräver ingen teknisk kunskap, läsaren leds framåt genom ett rikt utbud av övningar som ger möjlighet att tillämpa innehållet.Webbutveckling med PHP och MySQL är i första hand en lärobok för universitetsstudier i webbprogrammering men även en handbok för webbdesigners och programmerare i näringslivet.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Montathar Faraon


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Gender & ICT '11. Umeå : Umeå universitet.

Critical perspectives are rare in human-computer-interaction (HCI) research. Although digital artifacts constitute a fundamental part of the contemporary lifestyle it is seldom discussed how the use of such objects affect the way we understand the world. We propose a new concept, norm-critical design, in which the unit of analysis is the interaction design consisting of technology, interaction, images, sounds, text and how they together construct meaning.  We argue that there is a need to unpack how digital design embeds norms and to examine how the relationship between norms and design can be critically examined.     The discussion in this paper is based on two different empirical studies. First we will discuss how normative structures are present in the image blog site bilddagboken.se The other empirical material that we discuss is a case study of the design work in a youth counselling site in Sweden (umo.se). The case study gives examples of how different design elements are used in the design and development of websites in order to create a norm-critical experience for the users. We describe how these concerns affect the design outcome in the development of an animation about love.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria NormarkSofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 1st International Workshop on Values in Design - Building bridges between RE, HCI & Ethics. : .

Although digital artefacts constitute a fundamental part of thecontemporary lifestyle it is seldom discussed how the use of such objects affect the way we understand the world. We propose a new concept, norm-­critical design, in which the unit of analysis is the interaction design consisting of technology, interaction, images, sounds, text and how they together construct meaning. We argue that there is a need to unpack how digital design embeds norms and to examine how the relationship between norms and design can becritically examined. We base our discussion on studies of online youth counselling.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria NormarkMinna RäsänenSofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Think Design Play. : .

This is a study on the function of the prototyping process in game design. It is based on interviews with 27 game designers in leading positions at companies of various sizes. Prototyping is an important part of game design with which design ideas are explored. One central purpose of prototypes is to serve as a communicational tool. As such it is used to negotiate design problems. Rhetoric has a long tradition of analyzing communication and negotiation. In this paper a number of concepts from rhetoric, (topos, hodos, pistis, partes and to some extent synecdoche) are applied to game prototyping based on data collected as interviews. The results indicate that rhetoric concepts are useful when talking about the prototypes as they grasp the qualities of a prototyping in a good way. By applying the findings using negotiation theory to real practice the game prototyping process would likely become clearer without diminishing its creative qualities. As presented here negotiation theory could serve as a conceptual framework for game prototyping, which the design team can make use of in their design process.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jon Manker

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Connecting computer-supported collaborative learning to policy and practice. : International Society of the Learning Sciences.

In this paper we present findings based on the design and study of a game like activity that allows for physical and bodily interaction around abstract concepts like energy and energy consumption in a collaborative learning setting. The game, called Weather Gods and Fruit Kids, uses motion sensing technologies in combination with tactile and audio feedback to create an embodied interactive setting without computer screens. We analyze and discuss the properties of the interactive setting as well as the interactions with and around the system using characteristics such as multiple modalities of response, large space interaction and aspects of focus and attention. The work suggests that alternative pedagogical activities can be created providing new entries to theoretical concepts using an embodied interaction approach. In particular it may support kinesthetic learners in their preference to learn by being physically engaged.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Carloina Johansson

Jakob Tholander

Martin Jonsson

Saiful Sumon


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Swinton : British Computer Society (BCS).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jon Manker

Mattias Arvola


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: TEI '11 Proceedings of the fifth international conference on Tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction. New York : ACM Press.

In this work we present the monster eye installation, consisting of an artifact with which you can examine secrets that are hidden inside the walls.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Magnus Mattsson

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ana Graviz

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Culture and EducationSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
EducationMedia Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristina Abiala

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary StudiesSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andra Siibak

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Locus 2011, 1 : 22-37.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Annika Lindkvist

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Global Studies of Childhood 2011, 1 (4): 365-376.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andra Siibak

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Libro de actas DRT4ALL 2011. : .

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have the potential of facilitating the lives of citizens. However, experience consistently shows that user-interface innovations for consumer products are being researched and developed without taking into account the needs of people with disabilities. ETSI, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, has established a Specialist Task Force (STF) 377 on “Inclusive eServices for all: Optimizing the accessibility and use of upcoming user interaction technology”. The aimof this working group is to systematically evaluate ongoing and forthcoming interaction technologies to sketch a 10-year roadmap of foreseen technological enablers. The results of investigations using this method allowstakeholders in different stages of the research and development lifecycle of e-Services to identify and avoid potential difficulties in the design of user interfaces which could cause elderly or disabled users to experience usability issues.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Alejandro Rodriguez-Ascaso

Helge Hüttenrauch

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: TEI'11. Funchal, Portugal : ACM Press.

In this paper findings are presented from a study on how sensor equipped computer game technologies can be used to create tools for educational settings to learn about for example concepts in physics. In a workshop focusing on the concept of gravity, a group of children interacted with an environment consisting of both physical and digital interactive components. We discuss how the mixed digital and physical setting affects the children's coordination and collaboration and their strategies to solve the given assignment. Findings suggest that the embodied nature of the technology create new opportunities for collaboration and that the alignment of the physical and digital parts of the interactive setting is important in order to create a seamless experience that takes advantage of the properties of the respective media.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Lars Erik Holmquist

Martin Jonsson

Saiful Islam Sumon

Zeynep Ahmet


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds 2011, 3 (3): 259-275.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ulf Hagen


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds 2011, 3 (3): 175-180.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Annika Waern

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: CSCW'11. New York, NY, USA : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

This paper introduces Express Location, a mobile web application, supporting drivers in delivery service in the daily coordination of work. Remote communication and cooperation takes place on a shared map view around the drivers’ locations and next stop, through a drawing/doodling tool and multiple visual object representations. The aim is to understand the working situation and the use of locations in the daily work to better support the coordination of mobile delivery work.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Lars Erik Holmquist

Maria Normark

Markus Westerlund


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Leonardo 2011, 44 (5): 433-438.

This paper proposes the concept of enactive system as an alternative to the standard assumption of the human-computer-interaction and elaborates the idea of content mediation as enactive media. Our system consists of the two elements coupled in a holistic manner by means of bodily and spatial involvement, or enactment. It has two directions and is recursive by nature involving the impact of the technology on the human agent and the effect of the human experience on the technology. Instead of the standard explicit interface in the middle there is an implicit connecting surface, based on unconscious psychophysiological reactions. Our aim is not only to point out an analytic approach to existing media systems, but also to develop radically novel media concepts implied by the concept.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Niklas Ravaja

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Advanced Robotics 2011, 25 (18): 2233-2254.

Robots are increasingly being used in domestic environments and should be able to interact with inexperienced users. Human-human interaction and human-computer interaction research findings are relevant, but often limited because robots are different from both humans and computers. Therefore, new human-robot interaction (HRI) research methods can inform the design of robots suitable for inexperienced users. A video-based HRI (VHRI) methodology was here used to carry out a multi-national HRI user study for the prototype domestic robot BIRON (BIelefeld RObot companioN). Previously, the VHRI methodology was used in constrained HRI situations, while in this study HRIs involved a series of events as part of a 'home-tour' scenario. Thus, the present work is the first study of this methodology in extended HRI contexts with a multi-national approach. Participants watched videos of the robot interacting with a human actor and rated two robot behaviors (Extrovert and Introvert). Participants' perceptions and ratings of the robot's behaviors differed with regard to both verbal interactions and person following by the robot. The study also confirms that the VHRI methodology provides a valuable means to obtain early user feedback, even before fully working prototypes are available. This can usefully guide the future design work on robots, and associated verbal and non-verbal behaviors.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michael L. Walters

Helge Hüttenrauch

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: New Frontiers in Human–Robot Interaction. Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2011. 185-210.

In designing socially interactive robots we have focused on robot movement and its role in multi-modal human-robot communication. In this chapter we describe design and evaluation of robot body movements supporting communication, investigating the idea of using speed and orientation adjustments as design elements in human-robot interaction. The scenario studied includes a robotic shopping trolley that offers products via speech and GUI to the user while both are moving in a supermarket-like environment. Our results show that if the robot slows down while making such offers, users are more prone to react upon them and to take the product. However, even from our early pre-study with mock-up robots we observed that users tended not to mention the robot’s slow-down movements, even if these movements were shown several times to them during a video-based debriefing. This phenomenon, that users react implicitly on the robot’s movements without being consciously aware of them, was confirmed during an experimental study with a fully integrated robot prototype. We discuss our results by reflecting on human-robot interaction design methods, and we draw implications from the lessons learned in the study of the design of robot behaviours. In particular, we list a whole set of challenges for HRI when both the user and the robot are moving.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Cristian Bogdan

Anders GreenHelge Hüttenrauch

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: MindTrek '11 Proceedings of the 15th International Academic MindTrek Conference. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

Gameplay design patterns are semiformal interconnected descriptions features of gameplay. While most previous patterns have been identified through analyzing existing games, this paper proposed how patterns can be identified using theories as starting points. More specifically, we propose three different approaches to harvesting gameplay design patterns: 1) using theories as analysis foci, 2) distilling patterns from theories, and 3) using theories to understand the consequences of having or not having patterns present in a game design. The three approaches are presented together with examples of their use, and based upon this the concept of Theory Lenses as an analytical tool is introduced as a way of allowing theories independent of their research field to be applied to research on gameplay design.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Staffan Björk

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference on International Higher Education (IHE 2011). Shanghai, China : IADIS Press.

This paper explores the attitudes, conceptions and use of social media in net-based higher education. By using statistical and content analysis of data generated by two surveys directed to students (n = 109) and teachers (n = 77) involved in net-based higher education, we explore how social media influence the design of learning context in net-based higher education courses. By applying the affordance theory, we describe actual as well as preferred use of social media from an educational, social, and technical perspectives. The results showed that the potential use of social media have not yet been fully found in the context of net-based higher education. However, the perceived benefit of using social media differs in relation to educational topics. The potential use of social media in net-based higher education courses is discussed.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Björn Cronquist

Mauri Kaipainen

Montathar Faraon


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Bristol : Intellect Ltd., 2011.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Annika Waern

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference ICT, Society and Human Beings 2011. Rome, Italy : IADIS Press.

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on how potential circumventing media and communication technologies could potentially assist the information flow when authoritarian regimes decide to block the main channels, such as the Internet and the mobile phone networks. The point of departure is the recent Internet blackouts in countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), such as Egypt, Bahrain and Libya. We discuss several applications that were developed as a response to state repression in these countries, and their future potential that would allow people to communicate more freely despite Internet and mobile network blackouts.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Samira Atashi

Mauri Kaipainen

Montathar Faraon


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Digirakkaus 2.0. Turku : Turun yliopisto, 2011. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Markku Reunanen

Petri Lankoski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Knowledge organization 2011, 38 (6): 503-514.

Based on strong philosophical traditions, cognitive science results and recent discourses within the discipline of knowledge organization, the authors argue for a perspectivist approach to concepts in information systems. In their approach ontology is dissociated from concept, and instead conceptualization is left up to the epistemic activity of the information system user. A new spatial ontology model is explicated that supports multiple perspective-relative conceptual projections of the same domain. With an example domain and a demo application they provide a preliminary proof of concept of how different perspectives yield alternative classifications, categorizations and hierarchies, all the way to a different ways of narrating the domain. The results suggest the potential of multi-perspective knowledge organization systems that not support search and retrieval of information but even the articulation and conceptual disposition of information.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Antti Hautamäki

Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: When Design Education and Design Research Meet. : .

Quite often the product of design is assessed in interaction design education, but we need to develop criteria also for courses that focus on learning to conduct and manage the design process. An earlier approach to set grading criteria has been grounded in the SOLO (Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome) taxonomy. Students need, however, to learn practitioners' criteria, rather than teachers' criteria, to make a successful transfer to practice. One way of achieving that is to align criteria with the conceptions of design process quality used by professional interaction designers. The question is then what those conceptions are, and how they can be accounted for in assessment criteria for projects in interaction design education. A phenomenographic research method was used, and interviews were conducted with ten experienced interaction designers. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The results show that professional interaction designers see design process quality as inspiration, a well-grounded rationale, employment of established methods, and constraints management. These conceptions are mapped to a criteria-referenced grading scale. The criteria should, with careful transfer, be applicable also in other design disciplines.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mattias Arvola


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: NordiCHI 2010. New York : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

This paper reports the results of an action research project investigating the articulation of interaction design qualities for a web portal for urban planning and development. A framework for analyzing interaction design qualities is presented. The framework consists of the practical, the social, the aesthetic, the structural and the ethical quality dimensions, and it was tried out in practice with developers and designers of the portal. This provided experiences used to revise the framework. The results indicate that the framework can be improved by splitting the social quality dimension into a communicational dimension and an organizational dimension. The structural dimension is also renamed to the technical dimension.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mattias Arvola


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The 4th International Conference on Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Child and Teen Consumption - interdisciplinary, theory and practice. Linköping : Linköping University.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna LindqvistSofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Culture and EducationSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
EducationMedia Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andra Siibak

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Virtual. : Södertörn university.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall

Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings IADIS International Conference e-Society 2010. : IADIS Press.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mauri Kaipainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The first nordic symposium on technology-enhanced learning (TEL). Växjö : Linnéuniversitetet.

In this paper we focus on mobile language learning, and the design and development of a mobile application for teenager’s homework in Swedish as a second language. In the project we have used participatory design methods, with the aim to have a user-driven design process. We wish discuss how these design methods, and design activities relate to how design is viewed in the field of educational science.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ola Knutsson

Minna Räsänen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Utbildning & Lärande 2010, 1 : 98-112.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Computers Helping People with Special Needs. Berlin : Springer Verlag.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Alejandro Rodriguez-Ascaso

Helge Hüttenrauch

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 2010 4th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare. Gent : ICST.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

M Böcker

Helge Hüttenrauch

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 2010 International Conference on Information Society (i-Society). Newcastle-upon-Tyne : IEEE.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

M Pluke

Helge Hüttenrauch

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Barnet, platsen, tiden. Stockholm : Regionbibliotek Stockholm, 2010. 151-169.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Organizational communication and sustainable development. Hershey PA : Information Science Reference, 2010. 19-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

G Henriksson

Minna Räsänen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of DiGRA Nordic 2010. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ulf Hagen


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the 2010 Ninth International Conference on Mobile Business / 2010 Ninth Global Mobility Roundtable. Los Alamitos, Calif. : IEEE Computer Society.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ruixue Xia

Lars Erik Holmquist


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Rhetorica Scandinavica 2010, 55 : 54-71.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jon MankerMaria Wolrath-Söderberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Culture and EducationSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media TechnologyRhetoric

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andra Siibak

Annika Lindkvist

Cecilia Löfberg

Kristina Abiala

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2009

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary StudiesSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Good, the Bad and the Challenging. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Christian Bogdan

Helge HüttenrauchMinna Räsänen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2009

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Pedagogiska Magasinet 2009, 1 : 50-53.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2009

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Metropoli e nuovi consumi culturali. Roma : Carocci, 2009. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2009

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Breaking New Ground. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ulf Hagen


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2009

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the 7th ACM conference on Designing interactive systems. New York : ACM Press.

Sketching and design sketches are often recognized as key elements of successful interaction design practice and a central skill in interaction design expertise. Interaction design is a relatively young field without well-developed conventions, tools, and formalisms. We analyze the practical work and the conduct of interaction designers in how they express interaction and dynamics through whiteboard drawings. We focus on how talk and action were used to shape the meaning of the drawings. The ways the designers imagined that users would interact with the system and how it would mediate communication between users became topical through a web of drawings, talk, and embodied action. Our analysis forefronts three aspects of interaction design: 1) the role of the design material 2) the role of embodied action in interaction design, and 3) talk and embodied action as central means of doing design. We argue that the qualities of a design material need to be understood in relation to the activity in which it is taken into use and through the kinds of actions that the participants engage in. This implies that design representations do not carry meaning in themselves but are made meaningful through design activity. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jakob Tholander


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings of the 2nd international conference on Tangible and embedded interaction. New York : ACM.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ylva Fernaeus

Jakob Tholander

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nordicom Information 2008, 2 : 9-13.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Studia Universitas Babes Bolyai. Philologia 2008, 2 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Arina Stoenescu

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Journal of Arts and Technology 2008, 1 (3/4): 249-267.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ylva Fernaeus

Jakob Tholander

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Interacting with computers 2008, 21 (1/2): 117-124.

n the design of interactive systems, developers sometimes need to engage in various ways of physical performance in order to communicate ideas and to test out properties of the system to be realised. External resources such as sketches, as well as bodily action, often play important parts in such processes, and several methods and tools that explicitly address such aspects of interaction design have recently been developed. This combined with the growing range of pervasive, ubiquitous, and tangible technologies add up to a complex web of physicality within the practice of designing interactive systems. We illustrate this dimension of systems development through three cases which in different ways address the design of systems where embodied performance is important. The first case shows how building a physical sport simulator emphasises a shift in activity between programming and debugging. The second case shows a build-once run-once scenario, where the fine-tuning and control of the run-time activity gets turned into an act of in situ performance by the programmers. The third example illustrates the explorative and experiential nature of programming and debugging systems for specialised and autonomous interaction devices. This multitude in approaches in existing programming settings reveals an expanded perspective of what practices of interaction design consist of, emphasising the interlinking between design, programming, and performance with the system that is being developed.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ylva Fernaeus

Jakob Tholander

Martin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy 2008, 3 (2): 130-141.

We use the concept of digital literacy to refer to people’s competence of expressing themselves in computational form, and in this paper we specifically discuss the design of interactive technology aimed at letting children become digitally literate. A rarely discussed aspect of digital literacy in this respect concerns how it is supposed to take form in the context of improvised styles of use and interaction, resembling the kinds of activity commonly observed in kindergartens, school yards and centres for after-school activities. In such settings children often organize their own play activities, peers may go in and out of activities as they want, often without any necessary intervention by adult supervision. We align this kind of activity with the notion of ‘casual leisure’, and outline four basic challenges concerned with: a) a perspective on interaction, b) activity and context, c) the view of the user, and d) the character and role of the technology. We discuss these in relation to research attempting to design, evaluate, and make useful sense of children’s digital literacy in such activity. Our analysis identifies the sources of these challenges as due to expressions of tension between play and learning, between designers and users and a general striving for ‘hard fun’. The challenges and their consequences may be summarised as 1) the use of setting as allowing for spontaneous interactions, 2) the striving towards a participants’ perspective, 3) the incorporation of offline and social aspects into the design, and 4) the balancing of challenge with the easy and the accessible.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ylva Fernaeus

Jakob Tholander


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall

Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Shaping the future?. Basildon : Hadleys.

Design education is taking on new forms at many universities around the world, since many people see that a designer today works in many different contexts with many different materials. In Europe, the Bologna reform of higher education is therefore timely. It offers a possibility to reflect and restructure design curricula for the changing world of design. In this paper we outline the development of a Bologna style curriculum for a Master of Science (two years) with a Major in Design at Linköpings universitet in Sweden. The Master's Programme in Design is multidisciplinary, and the guiding principle is that a designer of tomorrow will work less with specific materials and more within differing design contexts. A problem we faced with the studio classes was how to define progression. In order to structure the progression we identified a set of core competences for designers. These competences are used to define areas within which learning outcomes can be defined. The competence fields are; Vision & concept, Design methods, Tools & materials, User & actor perspective, Versatility, Design theory & research and Continuous competency development. Our conclusion is progression in studio classes can be structured in relation to these fields.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

S. Holmlid

Mattias Arvola


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: People and Computers XXI. Swindon : British Computer Society (BCS).

In stakeholder meetings during an interaction design project, prototypes are commonly used for creating shared representations of design ideas. It can, however, be difficult for designers and meeting facilitators to know which prototyping technique to use. In this case study we compare user interface sketches, scenarios, and computer prototypes, and analyse video material from six stakeholder meetings. The scenario did not facilitate a focus on aesthetic or ethical perspectives, nor did it facilitate operational or perceptual issues. The prototype did not facilitate discussions on the overarching concept of the design, to the same extent as the sketches did, but it did facilitate operational issues. The sketches gave the broadest discussion. The groups also approached the design differently; for example, the system developers constantly returned to a constructional perspective. This means that the choice of prototyping technique should be made based on the composition of the group and the desired focus of the meeting. © 2007 Maria Johansson, Mattias Arvola.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Maria Johansson

Mattias Arvola


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: User Interfaces 2007. Sydney : Australian Computer Society.

The importance of a skilled facilitator in design meetings with users is often emphasized, but less is said about how to improve the facilitation process. This paper reports experiences and lessons learned from facilitation of cardbased sessions in three design cases through an analysis of two sessions with users, and one session with professional designers. The analysis showed that many alternatives were not documented in the sessions with users who designed primarily by talking, compared to the professional designers who primarily designed by placing cards. We propose that facilitation, in cases similar to those presented here, could be improved by suggesting alternatives and possible consequences, prompt the participants to explore the consequences, and graphic facilitation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jonas Lundberg

Mattias Arvola


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Virtual. Handen : School of Communication, Technology and Design, Södertörn University College.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Virtual. Handen : School of Communication, Technology and Design, Södertörn University College.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jon Manker

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Den digitala teknikens pedagogiska forskningserbjudanden. Stockholm : Pedagogiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, 2007. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The virtual. Handen : School of Communication, Technology and Design Södertörn College University.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ulf Hagen


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The virtual. Haninge : School of Communication, Technology and Design Södertörn College University.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Arina Stoenescu

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Handen : School of Communication, Technology and Design Södertörn College University, 2006.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Bornebusch

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Locus 2006, 1 : 32-47.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall

Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: People and Technology. Handen : School of Communication, Technology and Design, Södertörn University College, 2006. 27-35.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: M3 (Handen). Handen : School of Communication, Technology and Design, Södertörn University College.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia Lundmark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Tidsskriftet Digital kompetanse 2006, 1 (2): 126-131.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: People and Technology. Handen : School of Communication, Technology and Design, Södertörn University College, 2006. 85-95.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: People and Technology. Handen : School of Communication, Technology and Design, Södertörn University College, 2006. 179-192.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Handen : School of Communication, Technology and Design, Södertörn University College, 2006.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Kulturella mötesplatser i tid och rum. Vasa : Åbo akademi, 2006. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Gränsöverskridande identiteter i globaliseringens tid. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2006. 45-55.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Oslo : Unipub, 2005. (ITU rapport ; 29)

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Guri Mette Vestby

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2005

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Tidskrift för lärarutbildning och forskning 2005, 1/2 : 137-175.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2005

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media Technology

Research area for doctoral studies

-