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Tourism Studies

Graphic element for the subject of Tourism StudiesAs people's leisure opportunities have increased and their demands have become increasingly sophisticated, tourism has developed into one of the world's most expansive industries, employing increasing numbers of people in related businesses.

However, as a phenomenon, tourism is nothing new, but has been found in different forms in different civilisations over the ages. It has also become an object of study and work-oriented academic knowledge has become more and more in demand on the labour market – both for new employees and those already in work.

Publications

Publications from the DiVA publications database are listed here on an ongoing basis.
Publications

In: Mellan Malmö och Minneapolis. Lund : Arkiv förlag & tidskrift, 2018. 69-84.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Christian Widholm


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: . : .

Background of the study While tourism in Stockholm is booming the little statistics that might serve as proxy indicates a standstill for the archipelago (Tillväxtverket 2016). Over the years, there has been some projects, e.g. Scandinavian Islands, Skärgårdssmak, and recently Hållbar Destinationsutveckling to get the businesses in the archipelago going. These seem not to have lasting impact and have preconceived solutions of the problems. The Central Baltic project Archipelago Business Development intends instead to inductively assess and address what problems entrepreneurs identify, systematising these in terms of business model development implications. A central feature of the project is also student participation, where university students om Finland and Sweden work with the problems in courses. Purpose of the study In terms of business strategy discussions, the infrastructural situation of the islanders, e.g. logistics, transportation and internet infrastructure, a configurational approach can be deepened, embellishing on the works like Wiklund & Shepherd (2005) assessing business performance based on the onstructs entrepreneurial orientation (Covin & Slevin, 1991), environmental dynamism (Miller, 1987a,b; Ketchen et al., 1993) and access to financial capital (Bourgeois, 1981; Zahra, 1991; Cooper et al., 1994, ). Also, the specific characteristics of the customers to the archipelago need to be addressed. The purpose of the study is to understand the entrepreneurs’ conception of tourist behaviour and its consequences for strategy. Methodology In an initial step, entrepreneurs are being tapped on their perceptions of customer behaviour through interviews and register data on actual tourist behaviour. For example in a course on business intelligence, students interview entrepreneurs, and then use the customers’ utilization of web based resources of one of the destinations is being used as base for students’ suggestions on destination approach to development issues. The project thus generates behavioural data, that can be assessed directly as well as indirectly through the entrepreneurs’ understanding. Results The project is not finished, so conclusive results are not at hand as of yet. Indications so far point in the direction that the rather large share of second home tourists are sceptical towards costly or peace- disturbing projects, which is in line with earlier findings (e.g. Löfgren, 1999), whereas occasional events have substantial attraction value. So far there has been limited data on occasional tourists, du to that high season has not been covered by the project yet. Expectations are here that it is more relevant to understand consumer behaviour from Belk’s (1988) idea that consumption patterns are best understood as identity building processes. Here preference for well-being is a hypothesised top candidate of travel motivation, based in preliminary interview data with entrepreneurs. The approach will also enable considering the geographical aspects of localisation and destination scale, which is not properly taken into consideration in the aforementioned model, as well as customer characteristics. The concept of environmental dynamics can be deeper understood, since many of the archipelago actors experience both high and low dynamism in different seasons. Since tourism generally is consumed as complex products, value architecture (Spieth & Schneider, 2016) and its implications for Coopetition (Bouncken & Fredrick, 2016a) and Business model innovation Bouncken & Fredrick, 2016b) will be further explored in other areas than ICT and Biotech SMEs. Conclusions, research implications and limitations As the project is not finished, there is not really grounds for drawing conclusions, and implications and limitations should also await the increased robustness available when the whole project is finished before evaluation. Of course, the shortcomings of idiosyncratic studies, like unclear representativeness of case studies, and volatility of values as well as memory problems affect on interview trustworthiness. References References Belk R.W. (1988). Possessions and the Extended Self. Journal of Consumer Research. 15(2), 139-168. Bouncken R.B., & Fredrick V. (2016a). Learning in coopetition: Alliance orientation, network size, and firm types. Journal of Business Research. 69(5), 1753–1758. Bouncken R.B., & Fredrick V. (2016b). Business model innovation in alliances: Successful configurations. Journal of Business Research, 69, 3584-3590. Bourgeois, L.J. (1981). On the measurement of organizational slack. Academy of Management Review. 6(1), 29–39. Cooper, A.C., Gimeno-Gascon, F.J., & Woo, C.Y. (1994). Initial human and financial capital as predictors of new venture performance. Journal of Business Venturing. 9, 371-395. Covin, J.G., & Slevin, D.P. (1991). A Conceptual Model of Entrepreneurship as Firm Behavior. Entrepreneurship, Theory and Practice, Fall, 7-25. Ketchen, D.J.Jr., Thomas, J.B., & Snow, C.C. (1993) Organizational configurations and performance: a comparison of theoretical approaches. Academy of Managent Journal. 36(6), 1278–1313. Löfgren, O. (1999). On holiday: A history of vacationing, California studies in critical human geography, 6. Berkeley, Ca.: University of California Press Miller, D. (1987a). Strategy making and structure: analysis and implication for performance. Academy of Managent Journal. 30 (1), 7–32. Miller, D. (1987b). The structural and environmental correlates of business strategy. Strategic Management. Journal. 8(1), 55–76. Spieth, P., & Schneider, S. (2016). Business model innovativeness: Designing a formative measure for business model innovation. Journal of Business Economics. Special Issue Business Model Innovation and Transformation, 86(6), 671–696. Tillväxtverket (2016). Fakta om Svensk Turism 2015. Stockholm: Tillväxtverket. Wiklund, J. & Shepherd, D. (2005). Entrepreneurial orientation and small business performance: a configurational approach. Journal of Business Venturing. 20, 71–91.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gustaf Onn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 26th Nordic Symposium of Tourism and Hospitality Research, October 4-6 2017, Falun, Sweden. Falun : Högskolan Dalarna.

While Tourism in Sweden is booming, the Stockholm Archipelago seems to be at a standstill at best (Tillväxtverket 2016) Attempts at seasonal prolongation show no clear results. Archipelago Business Development is a 3-years EU-Interreg project commenced October 2016 aiming at business model improvement. At Södertörn University, students from Tourism studies, Business Studies and Media Technology are enrolled. The project is on the Swedish side currently recruiting businesses to participate in the project. Pilots using course work, where students find their own empirical objects include intermediate level projects in Net-based Information Systems, Tourism innovation projects pursuing improvements in business models. Several bachelor, and master essays are under way. Students are to interact with entrepreneurs through business clinics –speed-dating like consultancies where the business bring their problems and students collaborate in teams to suggest solutions to the problems, possibly backed up by experts. Also, there is to be an accelerator programme where a selected number of entrepreneurs are in for a long term business model development project of longitudinal character, where students may join at a certain point or follow the process. In April 24th, there will be a student kick-off at Södertörn University with participants from the business side, municipalities and Swedish project partners and on April 26th, the corresponding event will be in Turku with all project partners. Expectations are that students will get a closer grip on the reality of businesses. At the time of the conference, experience from this pedagogical experiment will have some results to discuss.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gustaf Onn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 26th Nordic Symposium of Tourism and Hospitality Research, October 4-6 2017, Falun, Sweden. Falun : Högskolan Dalarna.

A BarCamp is a “non-conference” where neither speaker, program events nor seminars are predetermined. The starting point is just a common theme on which the participants shape the content and the setup of the event. The actual agenda is decided on the spot on issues agreed among the participants. Everyone participates equally in conversations and discussions and they are supposed to generously share their knowledge and experience. This paper aims to evaluate if a BarCamp actually is a NEW type of meeting or if it just a face-lift of all already well-known meeting forms in the literature. The study is based on observations and empirical material from three BarCamps that took place in Sigtuna, Sweden, between 2013 and 2016. Although nominations and votes on different topics suggestions and/or interesting issues in the initial plenary-meeting will decide what to be brought up on the BarCamp, it can be questioned how objective and “free minded” such determination actually is? As in every field based on social relations; professions, titles and experience might have a crucial effect on how the agenda will be set. Economic and/or political intentions might play a role as well, and perhaps the personality of the participants. However, result points out that there is a difference between such meetings where the participants creates the agenda without preparation on beforehand and more traditional meetings as for example company-meetings, conferences, congresses, incentives and events.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dennis ZalamansGustaf Onn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Nordic Geographers Meeting, Stockholm 18th –21st June 2017, Session L3: Rural entrepreneurship. : .

While tourism in Stockholm is booming the little statistics that might serve as proxy indicates a standstill for the archipelago (Tillväxtverket 2016). Over the years, there has been some projects, e.g. Scandinavian Islands, Skärgårdssmak, and recently Hållbar Destinationsutveckling to get the businesses in the archipelago going. These seem not to have lasting impact and have preconceived solutions of the problems. The Central Baltic project Archipelago Business Development intends instead to inductively assess and address what problems entrepreneurs identify, systematising these in terms of business model development implications. In terms of business strategy discussions, the infrastructural situation of the islanders, e.g. logistics, transportation and internet infrastructure, a configurational approach can be deepened, embellishing on the works like Wiklund & Shepherd (2005) assessing business performance based on the constructs entrepreneurial orientation (Covin & Slevin, 1991), environmental dynamism (Miller, 1987a,b; Ketchen et al., 1993) and access to financial capital (Bourgeois, 1981; Zahra, 1991; Cooper et al., 1994, ). The approach will also enable considering the geographical aspects of localisation and destination scale, which is not properly taken into consideration in the aforementioned model. The concept of environmental dynamics can be deeper understood, since many of the archipelago actors experience both high and low dynamism in different seasons. Since tourism generally is consumed as complex products, value architecture (Spieth & Schneider, 2016) and its implications for Coopetition (Bouncken & Fredrick, 2016a) and Business model innovation (Bouncken & Fredrick, 2016b) will be further explored in other areas than ICT and Biotech SMEs.References Bouncken R.B. & Fredrick V. (2016a) ”Learning in coopetition: Alliance orientation, network size, and firm types”, Journal of Business Research, 69(5), 1753–1758. Bouncken R.B. & Fredrick V. (2016b) ”Business model innovation in alliances: Successful configurations”, Journal of Business Research, 69, 3584-3590. Bourgeois, L.J. (1981) “On the measurement of organizational slack”, Academy of Management Review, 6(1), 29–39. Cooper, A.C. Gimeno-Gascon, F.J. & Woo, C.Y. (1994) “Initial human and financial capital as predictors of new venture performance”, Journal of Business Venturing, 9, 371-395. Covin, J.G. & Slevin, D.P. (1991) “A Conceptual Model of Entrepreneurship as Firm Behavior”, Entrepreneurship, Theory and Practice, Fall 1991, 7-25. Ketchen et al., (1993) Ketchen, D.J.Jr., Thomas, J.B. & Snow, C.C. (1993) “Organizational configurations and performance: a comparison of theoretical approaches” Academy of Managent Journal, 36(6), 1278–1313. Miller, D. (1987a) “Strategy making and structure: analysis and implication for performance”, Academy of Managent Journal, 30 (1), 7–32. Miller, D. (1987b) The structural and environmental correlates of business strategy” Strategic Management. Journal, 8(1), 55–76. Spieth, P., & Schneider, S. (2016) “Business model innovativeness: Designing a formative measure for business model innovation.” Journal of Business Economics. Special Issue Business Model Innovation and Transformation, 86(6), 671–696.Tillväxtverket (2016) Fakta om Svensk Turism 2015, Stockholm: Tillväxtverket. Wiklund & Shepherd (2005) “Entrepreneurial orientation and small business performance: a configurational approach”, Journal of Business Venturing, 20, 71–91.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gustaf Onn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 6th International Tourism Conference ENCUENTROS / AIRTH 2017 : Innovation in Tourism and Hospitality – Preparing for the Future. : AIRTH.

Tourism consumption in Sweden 2015 was SEK 263 billion, an increase by 7% from 2014 and 46,7% from 2005 (Tillväxtverket, 2016, p. 16). For Stockholm Archipelago, no statistics are available, but guest nights in the guest harbours can be a proxy for tourism development. In 2015 there were 172,531 overnight guests in private yachts, a decrease by 31% from 2014 and 29% from 2005. During the same period, the other types of commercial lodging in the country as a whole has had a monotonous increase in over night guests totalling 40,7% in the past decade. According to Löfmarck & Wolgast (2010) more than 50% of employees worked for businesses with 6 employees or less, while 10 companies supplied about a quarter of the jobs in the tourism sector and the seven largest companies constituted the top quartile in terms of revenue; there were few rather large companies and many small businesses. The archipelago is considered a good tourist amenity, but obviously there is dire need for rethinking how things are done in the region in, order to catch up, and one reasonable point of departure is assessing the business models in use. For this reason an EU-Interreg financed project was launched on October 1st, 2016. A first issue to settle is updating the situation on businesses active in the archipelago, where after comes the assessment of their business models, in which businesses are to be linked to students, where the former get access to up to date tools for business model assessment in collaboration between Drivhuset, a foundation coaching incubator activities at many Nordic universities, Södertörn university in Sweden, and Åbo Akademi University and Novia university of applied sciences in the Finnish archipelagos of Turku and Nyland. Student participation is planned in two ways: In course work students in work groups assess the situation each participant enterprise is in, analyse their business models and suggest alterations. Also, students will do thesis work on bachelor’s and master’s levels. The course work will be assessed on academic as well as practical utility merits, while the theses are assessed on academic merits only. Researchers will follow the development of participant enterprises as well as the project’s impact on quality of education. The project is based on Osterwalder’s business model canvas approach to innovation utilising hypothesis driven design methods, where academic staff guides the process. Going through the literature on business models, it seems that on the one hand, little consensus is about when it comes to the exact definition of the term, while a rather broad one is about, when it comes to that somehow involves value creation – and often value capture, and what the necessary means of doing so are (e.g. Osterwalder, 2004; Teece, 2010; Zott et al. 2011), i.e. it is on how businesses are blue printed in order to sustain themselves, In that sense, it is related to business strategy. (c.f. Teece, 2010). Often there is a presumption on entrepreneurial activity, especially when it comes to business model innovation. In the entrepreneurship literature, there is a distinction between entrepreneur by nature and entrepreneur by necessity. Many of the inhabitants of the Stockholm archipelago are lifestyle entrepreneurs, and hence maximum profit is not self-evident as objective, even though better earnings are welcome; there is not really an option of taking place out of the configuration the business model is based in. The lifestyle entrepreneur is characterised by being able to lead the life at hand as motivation for activities, while the ‘normal’ corporation are taking on economic activity in order to maximise value added, often implying the building of shareholder wealth. The difference implies that the corporation is expected to pursue all businesses that are above the internal rate of interest on investments, while the lifestyle entrepreneur shuns any option that is not relevant to her/his lifestyle. Commonly this means enduring low profitability requirements. These rather atypical businesses open the possibility of widening the scope of the literature to alternatives to entrepreneurial orientation towards strategy, other forms of packaging, and through that, further exploration of the relation between networks and alliances and business models.References:Löfmarck A & Wolgast H. (2010). Studie av turismrelaterad näring i åtta skärgårdskommuner, Unpublished report to Stockholm County.Osterwalder, A. (2004). The Business Model Ontology – A Proposition in a Design Science Approach, Doctoral Thesis, l’Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales de l’Université de Lausanne, Lausanne. Teece, D.J. (2010). Business Models, Business Strategy and Innovation, Long Range Planning, 43(2-3), 172-194. Tillväxtverket (2016) Fakta om Svensk Turism 2015, Stockholm: Tillväxtverket. Zott, C., Amit, R. & Massa, L. (2011). The Business Model: Recent Developments and Future Research, Journal of Management, 37(4), 1019-1042.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gustaf Onn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 26th Nordic Symposium of Tourism and Hospitality Research October 4-6 2017, Falun, Sweden. Dalarna, Sweden : .

Abstract from the presentation of: City destination image- How destination characteristics can be interconnected with visitors' destination image  Göran Andersson & Saeid AbbasianTourism Studies, Södertörn University, SwedenEmail: goran.andersson@sh.se Destination Management Organisations (DMO) package the city image into a clear brand in order to attract foreign visitors (Eringa & Zhou, 2015). Still it is a complex task to analyse visitor segments' image experiences (Stepchenkova & Mills, 2010). Unique characteristics of tourism destinations are exploited by DMO:s and tourism companies, such as their identity (Valls et al., 2012), in planning and marketing products for different visitor segments. Besides, big cities are typically more well-known and organised destinations which opens for new forms of image marketing (Lucarelli & Berg, 2011).The purpose of the research project is to investigate the characteristics and interconnected images of a city destinations; and visitor segments' experiences of city images based on image attributes. A multidisciplinary approach with an explorative purpose is used. The theoretical framework consists of city destination characteristics and images, image experiences, and visit motivators.Typical characteristics and visitor segments were identified in the case of destination Stockholm in our pilot study. The results have been used in a qualitative investigation about the city image and its attributes, and also visitor's image expectations and experiences. Furthermore, an overall case study of Stockholm city will be conducted.The knowledge contribution relates to new city destination characteristics connectivity to images. Furthermore, the image impact on visitor travel motivators before and after visiting the destination. A model will be developed about “visitors' image positions”, based on the visitors' assessment of destination image attributes. This knowledge will support tourism companies and DMO:s to develop image marketing tools.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran AnderssonSaeid Abbasian

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 26th Nordic Symposium of Tourism and Hospitality Research October 4-6 2017, Falun, Sweden. : .

Political crises which have negative impact on the choice of a tourism destination can also affect the choice of a second-home destination negatively. The purpose of this study is to investigate why a part of Swedish-Iranian second home buyers prefer Spain than Turkey due to the politics. The group has shown interest in second-home purchase in the two countries during recent decade. More than 30 short dialogues were made with Swedish-Iranian buyers at the exhibition of “Buying Properties Abroad” in Kista, September 2015, after the start of a series of political crises in Turkey. A simple question was asked: Why do you choose Spain before Turkey? Most of the respondents gave more than three reasons.82The most important category of reasons were political factors followed by cultural factors. Political anxiety, instability and insecurity in Turkey, risk for civil war, police society, lack of democratic order, the fact that Turkey is not EU member, the government’s negative attitude towards Kurds, and the origin of Islamic state were the most mentioned political reasons. Cheating among some shopkeepers, negative attitudes by authorities towards Iranians, general perception of foreign women/female tourists, lack of a modern culture in Turkey, and better mentality among Spanish people have been among the cultural reasons. Among the economic reasons they mentioned lack of good infrastructure in Turkey, insecurity for invested capital, lower living costs in Spain, it is safer to buy house in Spain as EU country. Other less mentioned reasons were natural preconditions and knowledge on Spanish language.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Saeid Abbasian

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 26th Nordic Symposium of Tourism and Hospitality Research October 4-6 2017, Falun, Sweden. : .

Second home tourism is often discussed in the context of the western world. Other groups and their motivations, in this case people of Iranian background who are a large ethnic group in Sweden, are often neglected, although the group has shown interest in purchase of second home in Turkey.The aim of this study is to get more insight on Swedish Iranians’ purchase of second home in Turkey. 19 e-mail interviews (with Broker companies, owners, and potentially buyers) have been conducted. Also participant observation in Antalya region in June 2015 and at the exhibition of “Buying Properties Abroad” in Kista in September 2015 has been done.The interview results reveal that the Swedish Iranian second home buyers collect information through friends and relatives, various web sites, exhibitions, brokers, and real estate companies before buying apartment. Their motives have been: following other friends/relatives who bought apartments there, cultural proximity including the Turkish language and food, geographic proximity to Iran, relatives living in Iran do not need Turkish visa, economic factors including prices, the climate, and investment for the retirement. They stay in their apartments at least once a year up to 4 times a year and the duration of their stay each time is at least one week. A part of them might choose to live partly or permanently in Turkey after the retirement. Their motives are similar to many other second home owners elsewhere but there are also aspects related to the political context of this mobility.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Dieter K Müller

Saeid Abbasian

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum 2017, 28 september : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Reformer og ressourcer / Reforms and Resources: Rapporter til det 29. Nordiske Historikermøde / Proceedings of the 29th Congress of Nordic Historians. (1 udg.) Aalborg. (Studier i historie, arkiver og kulturarv, Vol. 7). Aalborg : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Tourism Futures 2017, : -.

The aim of the study is to examine the urban tourism from a Swedish perspective. The study focuses on the tourism system and tries to find out how it operates now and how it might change in the future. Furthermore, the study investigates the possibility for cooperation between tourism firms and how that will develop. If there will be a change within the tourism system, will tourist companies be prepared for new trends? How does the tourist industry, in Sweden, use the concept 'urban tourism'?How will the tourist industry manage the transition into the future?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Steene

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Book of Abstracts. : .

This study aims to investigate empirically what attitudes employees in tourism industry have towards participation in publicly funded competence development programmes. Such investigations are lacking in the research on Tourism industry. By competence development here means participation in personal competence development programmes that might have a positive impact on the staff’s learning and on their work places. This impact will be found out through the employees’ subjective perceptions. In this study the terms “competence development programmes” “training programmes” and “skills development programmes” are used as synonyms. Also in accordance with Statistics Sweden terms of “business” and “work place” are used as synonym. The methodological approach used in this study is email-interviews with 12 employees (four women, eight men) that have participated in these programmes during recent years. This includes CEOs, owners, employees and one instructor that also is a business owner himself. A majority of them have academic education and their average working years in the industry is 17. They represent various sub-industries. Their average age is 46 and they mostly come from small sized firms. They participated in different courses that were offered by public organizations for employees and employers, or by private organizations. The courses were paid either by public means, by the firm or by a combination of both. The courses were mostly organized by public organizations but in some cases also by private organizations or a mix of private and public. They expressed that their participation in general had a positive or very positive impact on their workplace, and among others resulted to better knowledge, to acquire a wider network, new ideas, new experiences and opportunities and gave more inspiration, motivation and self-confidence. Concerning effectiveness of courses offered by the public organization the opinions are different; some had no comments about it, some found them very effective, some believed that these courses are effective in some but not in all cases, and finally some believed that courses organized by private organizations are more effective. The largest problems for competence development in the industry are lack of time and money and lack of tailored courses.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Saeid Abbasian

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Tourism in the City. Switzerland : Springer, 2016. 147-161.

City destinations are central in the study of tourism. But how can visitor streams related to the destination characteristics and visitor segments be analysed and discussed as a basis for improvement of the destination? This research used statistical data and qualitative information as “knowledge indicators” rather than as “unambiguous facts”. The research included analysis of about 100 destination plans, a pilot study of statistics and qualitative destination information about Stockholm, and a literature review. It resulted in the development of the visitor stream concept, which can be used in future research on the integration of various visitor segment streams. A method for analysing visitor streams is suggested: (1) defining “focused destination” and its characteristics, (2) investigating quantitative and qualitative destination information, (3) identifying visitor segments, and (4) analysing streams with new destination tools. The knowledge gained will introduce and address new issues concerning statistics for measuring, monitoring and assessing the actual value of tourism, particularly urban tourism.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Book of Abstracts. Åbo, Finland : Åbo Turismakademi.

All tourism destinations have unique characteristics that constitute their identity (Valls et al., 2012). Tourism companies, in turn, exploit these when planning and marketing product concepts for different market segments. In recent decades, the cities in the Baltic Sea region (BSR) have undergone a change considering their profiles as more well-known tourism destinations. Meanwhile, even the degree of professionalism in the tourism industry has increased. This opens opportunities for new forms of image marketing (Lucarelli & Berg, 2011). In order to understand city tourism better a comparison between urban and rural tourism will be made. Each destination and the associated companies have to develop their products and marketing campaigns in order to effectively promote themselves to various tourist segments. The purpose of this research project is to investigate the characteristics of city destinations, and how tourist segments translate them into destination images, and further how the image influences motivations for travel choice. Our theoretical framework consists of city destination concepts, destination characteristics and images, tourist segments' motivations and destination branding. In our pilot study, typical characteristics and tourist segments were found in the case of destination Stockholm. This result will be used when investigating how different tourist segments translate characteristics to an image perception. The planned research will take a multidisciplinary approach with an explorative purpose. A case study of two typical BSR-cities will be conducted, using interviews, statistical data, web site analysis and destination document studies. The knowledge contribution relates primarily to new forms of city destination characteristics and their impact on visitor travel motivators. Furthermore, a model for investigating segments' “image positions” will be developed based on a new kind of demand of city tourism and a more professional tourism industry, even though it is a complex task to determine image positions (Stepchenkova & Mills, 2010). Our hypothesis is that tourist segments are more interested in what city destination can offer today, but the supply side needs more knowledge how to influence the segments' travel motivators. We hope that the acquired knowledge will support destination organisations (DMO) and tourism companies to develop their tools for image marketing.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran AnderssonSaeid Abbasian

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: Book of Abstracts. Åbo, Finland : Åbo Turismakademi.

There has been a paradigm shift from heritage being only preserved, to also being shown as a tourist attraction. One of two diverse approaches amongst scholars to define heritage tourism is to use a visitor-experience perspective (Apostolakis, 2003). Different segments of tourists have their own unique experiences of the heritage. Specific aspects can be used to explain the experience, such as the “classical” aspects by Pine & Gilmore (1999). In addition, in the last few years other experience aspects have been identified, such as kick, comfort, competence and contact (Kairos Future, 2011). The concept of “the experience room” (Mossberg, 2003) is used to present an experience context. The assumption of this study is that the experience landscape is made up of perceptive signals that cover the human senses. Although one can ask how this approach supports the development of attractions. Cognitive and affective experiences were discussed at conferences on memory tourism in Estonia 2013-14, used in the pilot study to this research. The purpose of the present study is to enhance the knowledge about how tourist's experiences of heritage attraction can be analysed into aspects of experience for different segments of tourists, and secondly, how the human senses influence the tourist's cognitive and affective experiences. An overall case study method will be used to study four maritime tourist attractions. The study consists of unstructured ethnographical interviews, experimental observation of tourists, and tourist's own evaluations during the experience. The research contribution is to shed light to how meaningful aspects of experience can represent the experience of heritage attractions for different target groups. This is based on an analysis on whether tourist experience aspects can emerge from the sensory impressions of tourists' experi­ences (Agapito et. al, 2014). Another contribution is to figure out how the sense perception can be connected to affective and cognitive aspects that result in a joint experience of an attraction. The pilot study showed that enhanced customer investigations of tourist's experiences are needed, which will be further more analysed. In the end this research will hopefully give attraction developers new tools to generate innovative and well-attended heritage attractions.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

UTMS Journal of Economics 2016, 7 (2): 149-164.

Regardless of how society has evolved, travel and tourism have had a positive development since the end of Second World War. But now it seems that the perception of risk and danger is accentuated and the tourists choose destinations based on more safety and security for tourists.Risks often seem to be based on different global activities and actions from different groups, which the individual can not affect or influence over. These perceived risks thus affect the development of tourism and travel in a global perspective.This article would discuss the new threats to the global tourism due to the terrorist attacks that target different countries and in many cases the popular tourist destinations. With the result that travel has become more intra-regional again.The article makes a review of the slightly incomplete statistics available in the area and discuss possible strategies for overcoming the existing terrorist attacks.The conclusions of the article points to a more concrete cooperation between international and national organizations, governments, as well as NGOs, tour operators and civil society in general.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Steene

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

Employing examples from maritime heritage attractions in Sweden this paper aims to analyze how heritage stakeholders situate their enterprises through unreflective references to childhood. A pioneer in the business of shipwreck tours started a heritage project by trying to convince investors and to create general interest in the planned tours by thoroughly referring to the thrilling documentary films about the Titanic by James Cameron. In contrast to the logistically complex and not-so-dramatic shipwreck tours that were eventually realized, the pioneer’s almost boyish appreciation of the adventurous qualities of Cameron’s documentary conveys feelings of childhood. Another stakeholder in the same project recalled a media event from his childhood when he talked about his early interest of old warships at the bottom of the sea. Thus he told me in an interview about how he absorbed the live television broadcast in the early 1960s of the rescue of the seventeenth-century warship Wasa in Stockholm. A third stakeholder, involved in another maritime heritage attraction, referred to his seemingly happy childhood as a contrast to contemporary selfishness and gentrification that, in his view, seem to threaten the surrounding landscapes of his heritage project located on a an island where he spent his childhood summers. One of several hot-tempered arguments in David Lowenthal’s classic work The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History (1998) highlights the importance of childhood in the discourses of heritage. Since heritage merely seems to be a conspiratorial celebration of the past for Lowenthal, the childhood dimension is treated as a tool that the advocates of a specific heritage deliberately use to legitimize their version of bygone days. My research on heritage attractions confirms Lowenthal’s claim that childhood is a crucial element in heritage. Through analyses of texts and interviews pertaining to the maritime heritage attractions in Sweden, however, I contend that the use of more or less salient references to childhood could be understood as unreflective and habitual articulations. Nonetheless, even though the forms of heritage attractions may vary and the stakeholder’s so-called personality may differ, the imaginary landscapes of childhood appear to function as central prerequisites in the enterprises of heritage. However, to offer a deeper understanding of how the uses of childhood work within the logics of heritage, I propose that we move beyond Lowenthal’s critique. I propose that the references to childhood could be related to the concept of emotional communities, introduced by the historian Barbara Rosenwein (2006). The emotional community for her is a group in which people have a common stake, interests, values, and goals. These are reached through representations of emotion within in a system of norms and convention. The analysis focuses on the fabric of a social community and how emotions are discursively expressed; not unmediated feelings or emotions, which is the case in psychology. I believe that an analytical approach that makes use of the concept of emotional community with the focus on the different uses of the feeling of childhood is a way to deconstruct naturalizations, hierarchies, temporality, and spatiality within heritage.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Environmental and Tourism Analyses 2016, 4 (1): 5-29.

In society today there is a heated debate about sustainable development. It is argued that event organisations must take responsibility for sustainability, although they may lack appropriate development tools. The purpose of this article is to study how event companies and organisations can develop a sustainability process in a societal system context and the need for certification in their events. The analysis was based on the study of relevant literature, an investigation in Sweden and a systems analysis. A triangulation technique was used to combine the different methods. It is argued that there is a sustainability event system in a societal context, within which event organisations have a central role. A model of sustainability and certification process for an event organisation and its events is developed, which consists of criteria, activities, certification, effects and obstacles. This recognised certificate could be a motivator and guideline for sustainable event development. The certification's focus has to be on the event organiser's management. However, event organisers need to certify their own organisations, either including all future events or only some specific events. This would give the organisations and the event industry a positive image and recognised role in a sustainable world.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Journal of Teaching in Travel & Tourism 2016, 16 (3): 195-212.

The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop an analysis model of a tourism department network using an explorative approach. Strategic stakeholders have been identified for the tourism department and organised into partner groups. An analysis model has been developed based on four network types: formal organisation, informal organisation, formal individual and informal individual. For every type, the following six network content dimensions were found relevant to analyse: stakeholders, reciprocal relations, relation exchange, network driving forces, network management and network purpose. The investigations have shown some focused network strengths such as network permanency, with corresponding weaknesses such as rigid relations. Some typical implications of the strengths and weaknesses for the department have been identified, and some network techniques to handle the implications have been proposed. An annual network development process for a tourism department is suggested. The resulting network is summarised as the Professional Tourism Academic Network (PTAN).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism 2016, 16 (3): 225-242.

This paper examines the attitudes towards experience industries and tourism in the Gnosjö region of Sweden. The investigation is based on a questionnaire and follow-up interviews with politicians and chief executive officers (CEOs) within manufacturing industries. The results show that the politicians have more knowledge of experience industries and a more positive attitude towards these new types of industries than the CEOs. Both groups consider both these industries of significance for the region's future. While the politicians believe in experience industries as a whole, and particularly suggest more active work in favour of tourism and design, the second group just welcomes directly and indirectly a possible cooperation with design companies. A minor share of the CEOs is interested in either running businesses with features of experience industries or having a sense of it in their businesses. Despite differences, these attitudes facilitate cross-fertilisation between the manufacturing industry and experience industries in the future. The study suggests that the region needs to develop more knowledge and competence directed towards the experience industries, in particular tourism and design, and a cooperation between the manufacturing industry, local political parties, and enterprises within tourism, design and culture in this respect.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Saeid Abbasian

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Integrating City Tourism into the Urban Research Agenda. L’Aquila, Italy : Gran Sasso Science Institute.

Stockholm hosts nearly eleven million commercial guest nights annually, and is ranked as one of Europe’s top ten destinations.The county population is 2.1 million (Stockholm Visitors Board,2014). In order to pursue economic, effective, and sustainable tourist destination development, it is important to understand its characteristics. In this study “city destinations” are focused on using sub-characteristics such as “visitor attraction clusters”. For understanding these characteristics, a clear definition of destination has to be used (Framke, 2002). The following components can be used to conduct an analysis of a destination: geographical place, visitor, image, complete tourist product, and interacting business and public sector (Andersson, 2013). Tourist destinations can be studied at the following different geographical place levels: the regional (e.g. the Stockholm region), the local (e.g. the old town) and the attraction-based destination point (e.g. Friends arena). The Stockholm Tourism Strategy 2020 project group has proposed a number of criteria that must be fulfilled before a destination can be considered mature. In order to gain an understanding of the demand (and revenue) side of destinations, unique criteria can be used for visitor segmentation in the city, such as visitor purpose. There are changing patterns of visitor streams in Stockholm, however, such as the dramatic increase in the number of cruise passengers (Stockholm harbour, 2015). Therefore the visitor stream planning has to be up-dated. By using criteria for visitor segmentation and characterization of the destination, economically strong and reachable visitor segments such as city-breakers can be identified. Visit Sweden has identified a number of segments, such as “double income no kids” (DINKs), that can serve as an overall category for citybreakers. Research purpose: To obtain deeper understanding of how regional, local, and point destinations can be developed using knowledge of the destination character and visitor streams within the destination. The theoretical framework is based on the concept of destination, the characteristics of city tourism, visitor segments, and streams. Methodology: As a starting point, approximately 150 destination plans have been written by my undergraduate students, and a pilot study and a literature review have been conducted. The next step will be a main case study on regional, local, and point destination levels in Stockholm and the associated visitor streams. The final step will be to draw conclusions about the model of visitor streams in city destinations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: Responsible Tourism?. Akureyri : Icelandic Tourism Research Centre.

There is a debate about responsible and sustainable development in tourist destinations. One could argue that event companies have a responsibility for sustainability, but they lack the analyses tools. The purpose is to investigate and analyse how companies working with events could develop a certification process of sustainability, and how decisions about an event’s sustainability certification could be supported. The analysis is based on both the study of relevant literature and investigations carried out and by using multi-criteria decision-making systems. A sustainable certification process is developed which consists of external company sustainability criteria, such as social, cultural, economic and ecological dimension, and also internal criteria such as using a sustainability plan. However, in this study certification obstacles have been found, for example certification costs. When developing the sustainability certification process a need is recognised for a decision support tool. Therefore a triangulation multi-criteria decision-making model is proposed consisting of six steps: 1. Problem formulation, 2. Computer criteria definition, 3. Definition of measures and rules, 4. Data collection and registering, 5. Total evaluation of the alternatives' results and 6. Final analysis and choice. When using the model there is a need for an integrated manual assessment by the evaluator and the computerbased expert system support. Therefore, triangulation of mainly qualitative research methods is used starting with qualitative interviews with an inductive approach by the evaluator, continuing with computer-based expert system analysis (the DEXi-system) with a logical interpretation approach and ending with the evaluator's deep interpretation of both manual and computer-based results.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum 2015, 18 november : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Proceedings from The 23rd Nordic Symposium On Tourism And Hospitality. Copenhagen : Copenhagen business school.

The Professional Societal Academic Network (PSAN) ofTourism Department Partners – A Swedish Case Study Triangulated with the EU-Project TARSI GÖRAN ANDERSSON (Södertörn University, Department of Tourism Studies, Stockholm, Sweden[1]) Universities are not isolated from society. Throughout the world and at the highest political level, there are pressures on the higher education sector to network with its surrounding society. This whole idea of networking is supported by the European Bologna process in connecting academia more closely with business and society and in new and innovative ways. Nevertheless, at universities there is a lack of knowledge on how to structure societal networks and a lack of experiences in network building. This causes problems with regard to effective co-operation between the university and its societal partners. The fact that universities are not isolated from society can also be recognised by the public debates on education, research and community engagement. Nevertheless, there are almost no research articles written about universities' societal networks.       The purpose of this research is to investigate university networks critically and to develop an analysis model for strategic partner relations and the underlying network structure within a Tourism Department's network.       A case study methodology has been used with the Tourism Department at the author's university being the object studied, in order to study the network building process since it was established in 1999. Experiences from the EU-project TARSI (Tailored Applied Research and Implementation) have been triangulated with the results from the case study.       Furthermore, a literature review has been conducted in order to identify which stakeholders appear in the literature of higher education-society interrelations and to find underlying dimensions to the university network structure. The theoretical framework is based on network theories, where network strategy, network partners, relation purpose, networks' formality, individual and organisational networks, network principles and obstacles are important themes.          For the Tourism Department, the following strategic partner types with associated relation purposes have been identified: the academic staff, current students, alumni, the tourism industry, public tourist organisations, non-profit tourist organi­sa­tions, macro-environment partners and the higher education sector. Every main stakeholder group has been organised into partner groups at the Tourism Department. The benefit of this approach is that special university objectives can be reached more easily if the Tourism Department has known part­ners in formal sub-groups already in place. In every sub-group there are typically questions depending on the Department's relation purpose.       A relation structure network model has been developed, where the dimensions of formal-informal and organisational-individual have been found relevant in order to structure the network. The model is based on the four main opportunity building principles of permanency, openness, motivation and trustfulness. However, there are also corresponding main obstacles of cost-benefit misunderstanding, relation burden, strategic unconformity and non-network opportunities.       There is a challenge in increasing the community engagement activities when using more resources. However, the benefits for the university and the surrounding world will be positive in total. It is of great importance for European university academies to use network strategies in their overall planning in order to be a natural part of society, which is summarised as the Professional Societal Academic Network (PSAN). Finally, the interaction of universities with society is regarded as a never-ending journey in a global world. KEYWORDS: Strategic network, Tourism Department, Community engagement, Network partners, Networks' formality, Individual-organisational stakeholders [1] For correspondence: Södertörn University, Department of Tourism Studies, 141 89  HUDDINGE, Sweden; e-mail: goran.andersson@sh.se

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Sociologisk forskning 2014, 51 (2): 184-186.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Steene

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Att lära en företagsekonom att tänka. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2014. 113-132.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gustaf Onn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Idrottsforum.org 2014, 19 augusti : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Återkopplingar. Lund : Mediehistoria, Lunds universitet, 2014. 329-347.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

International Journal of the History of Sport 2014, 31 (5): 509-518.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Journal of the History of Sport 2014, 31 (5): 516-525.

The centenary of the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm included an array of diverse events. By the use of Maurice Halbwachs' concept of 'collective memory,' this essay takes a critical look at a few of the major events and official accounts pertaining to the commemorations of 2012. Methods used are ethnographic observations, at events, and qualitative analyses of texts, videos and photographs from the official records on events. A number of recurring and salient tropes used during the centenary resulted in an overall merry picture of the 1912 Olympics. Investigations on collective memory in Sweden usually tend to focus on party politics, especially the era of the hegemonic Swedish Social-Democrats. According to these studies the influence of sports seems negligible. In this study it is argued that the collective memory of major sports events, like the 1912 Olympics, in Sweden work as influential mental structures that can both confirm and challenge conventional Swedish meta-narratives.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Lund : Studentlitteratur AB, 2013.

Turism handlar om att få en upplevelse av annorlunda karaktär. Turist är man på sin fritid, efter det att man utfört alla de uppgifter man har i form av arbete - avlönat eller av ideell karaktär. En del av denna fritid kan användas för att göra en semesterresa. Man kanske reser till någon annan plats i det egna landet, eller till någon plats i ett annat land.----De teman som diskuteras är fritid och rekreation, upplevelseturism, resandets determinanter samt köpprocessen, kvalitetsutveckling och hållbarhetsaspekter med utgångspunkt i turismindustrin.Framtiden är svår att sia om, men boken gör avslutningsvis ett försök att belysa en trolig utveckling inom turismindustrin. Studier påområdet pekar generellt sett påen ljus framtid, både för nationella och internationella aktörer. Men hållbarhetsaspekter kommer att kräva ökad hänsyn.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Steene

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Svenska Dagbladet 2013, 15 december : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Idrottsforum.org 2013, 10 december : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Entreprenörskap och varumärken. Möklinta : Gidlunds förlag, 2013. 107-124.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Huddinge : Turismvetenskap, Södertörns högskola, 2013. ( ; )

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Huddinge : Turismvetenskap, Södertörns högskola, 2013. ( ; )

I denna rapport slutredovisas uppdraget ”Kundundersökning av hundsporten i Stockholm”. Undersökningen är utförd på uppdrag av Huddinge kommun. En sammanfattande slutsats för denna studie är att ett stort intresse finns för hundägande och hundsport idag. I Stockholms län finns 80 tusen hundägare och 102 tusen hundar. I Huddinge kommun finns fyra tusen hundägare och 5 tusen hundar1. Utifrån rapportens resultatredovisning per frågeområde kan både idéer och konkreta förslag utläsas om hur hundsporten kan utvecklas både i Stockholms län och i Huddinge kommun. En generell slutsats är att det finns en en stark efterfrågan på professionella hundanläggningar (hundcenter), egna familjens hundaktiviteter på allmänna platser, lokala hunddagis, kurser, hundomvårdnadsprodukter, mat- och hundutrustningsprodukter och hundägararnas egna trivselprodukter.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research 2012, 2 (3): 147-154.

Thisarsociety looked at this article will describe how tourism education started in Sweden for about 33 years ago, at university level. The article gives some hints about how three dedicated young teachers take some initiatives at different collegesmore or less at the same time. It is description of how the established university system changed a lot and became a much more modern and streamlined one. The article ends up with some desires like what Swedish tourism programs in the near future need, is increased funding for research and more international contacts and collaborationwith other teachers and students!

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Steene

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure. New York : Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012. 275-296.

Tourism literature tends to focus on passive tourists, who constitute the majority of tourists today. However, there is a growing number of individuals who overlap their study, work, and business with tourism activities. These independent tourists have created a new segment in the tourism industry, where tourists develop and experience their own tourism activities. However, there is a lack of current research on these independent tourists, especially in terms of how they function in the experience management process and how this can be translated into various new types of offers.This study investigates the functions, experiences, and behaviors of this type of tourists. Accordingly, this study makes use of purposive sampling, employing direct observation, in-depth interviews, and analysis of personal social media (e.g., blogs). The findings show that while some independent tourists function in a multitude of ways, from searching for ideas to composing, creating, and experiencing their own products, others are less active and tend to piggyback their efforts on those of more active tourists. The study finds that the motivational matrix is highly important for individuals who combine work and tourism. Working persons with a strong motivation for tourism relative to work maintain high levels of commitment, activity, and creativity in the tourism sphere, especially when they face problems with their work. Highly satisfied independent tourists initiate future actions by either revisiting the same destination or leading others to have similar experiences at the same location. Finally, the chapter discusses some methodological lessons learned from direct observation and in-depth interviews and studying social media.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Solmaz Filiz Karabag


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research 2012, 2 (4): 172-183.

Academic dishonesty and plagiarism have become hot issues in newspapers and academia. However, there are few studies of how leading journals are handling these issues. Therefore the purpose of this paper is to analyze the current situation and policies concerning academic dishonesty, plagiarism and paper retractions in academia in general, and business and economics disciplines in particular. Four databases, Ebsco Business Source Premier, Emerald, JSTOR and ScienceDirect, have been examined. This survey shows that while some science journals, e.g. medical journals, are very active in retracting papers due to the dishonesty and plagiarism, business and economics journals are not. The survey also displays that some journals have already published explicit policies regarding academic honesty; within the business field, however, only two established and one emerging journal discuss such policies. Given the extent of the problem, it seems important that more journals openly confront the situation, elaborate and publish explicit policies how to reduce the future occurrence of academic dishonesty and plagiarism.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Christian Berggren

Solmaz Filiz Karabag


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: R&D Management Conference 2012. : .

A long-standing research tradition has studied processes of late industrialization, with China as the most recent and publicized case. A strong trend among late industrializers is to move rapidly from manufacturing, to product design and to creation of indigenous R&D capabilities. This paper analyzes such a process taking place close to Europe, in the rapidly growing Turkish economy. Most of the literature on R&D internationalization and innovation in emerging economies studies the country level. To these studies the paper brings an important complement by analyzing the performance of individual innovating firms and the structural conditions underpinning their development, such as the role of state support, business group ownership and business group orientation. The paper builds on a comparative case study of two firms in the automotive and white goods industries, and their R&D and product development trajectory, and a brief comparison of the involved business group with other types of business group orientation in Turkey. Insights in innovative, knowledge-acquiring firms in emerging economies are key to understand the broader dynamics of the global knowledge economy, and the new challenges for technology-based firms in the West, where firms from the ´periphery´ suddenly emerge as competitors, not based on low cost but on innovation, patenting and product design. By showing that firms may pursue different roads to upgrading from close collaboration with multinational companies to independent strategies based on autonomous development of proprietary technological knowledge, the paper calls for a differentiated understanding of emerging economy dynamics.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Christian Berggren

Solmaz Filiz Karabag


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Advances in Food, Hospitality and Tourism 2012, 2 (1): 52-75.

The importance of community engagement is debated by academics at universities and stakeholders in the higher education sector. Ideas from the EU-project Tailored Applied Research System Implementation are analysed to see how they can be implemented in an academic tourism department, and a community engagement model developed. Exploratory research is conducted using a qualitative method approach with case studies. Conclusions: 1. focused objectives for each stakeholder group which will be influenced by the tourism academy´s community engagement, 2. important prerequisites for the tourism academy engagement in the community and 3. potential co-creative actions, which the Tourism Department has possibilities to conduct.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dennis ZalamansGustaf OnnGöran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Advances in Food, Hospitality and Tourism 2012, 2 (1): 43-51.

The Agenda 21 model consists of economic, social, and ecological considerations, which are to be balanced for the sustainability concept to be applicable. However, the model is silent on how value conflicts within and between each sphere is handled. These conflicts are investigated in connection with temporal and place dimensions in the three spheres. Anecdotal empirical evidence indicates that three spheres are insufficient and that cultural heritage should be added. Models of sustainability should explicitly address issues of conservation and utilisation value. An attempt is made to integrate all these qualities into an integrated model.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gustaf Onn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Tourismos 2011, 6 (2): 53-64.

In 2008 the U.N. International Maritime Organisation set up new rules for sulphurous content in maritime fuel. That decision will also have consequences for shipping and trade in, inter alias, the Baltic Sea. From the 1st of July 2010, ships sailing in the Baltic Sea are allowed to have only 1, 5 % sulphurous content in the fuel of the ships and only 0, 1 % in 2015-01-01. Is this a threat to the tourism industry? Will there be fewer cruising ships in the Baltic Sea? Will the ferry traffic between the harbours in the Baltic Sea decrease due to higher fuel price, because of less sulphurous content in the fuel?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Steene

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Info 2011, 13 (2): 72-84.

Purpose –Several studies of the telecommunications industry have focused on government regulation and structural conditions, suggesting that initial order of entry and network effects create strong first-mover advantages for GSM companies. This paper seeks to change the focus to managerial capabilities and to investigate how an early mover on the Turkish market manages the phase of vigorous competition following the early-regulated period.Design/methodology/approach –The paper is a case study of one leading firm in the context of the Turkish telecommunications market development. The most important sources for data are Telepati Telekom Journal, Turkcell Annual Reports, Telecommunications Authority of Turkey's publications, the reports of investment institutions, web pages of operators, and previous publications about the Turkish telecom industry.Findings –The paper finds that the early mover, Turkcell, has used a mix of differentiated marketing strategies, innovative and diversified product development and increased service quality to defend its position in an era of increased competition with new operators, a high number of pre-paid customers and number portability.Originality/value –On the basis of this case, the paper argues that studies of the telecommunications industry need to expand their analyses of industry structures to also include firm-specific strategies and management capabilities.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Solmaz Filiz Karabag


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Insights 2011, 4 (5): 39-51.

The purpose is to consider ideas from the EU-project Tailored Applied Research System Implementation, and investigate network actions by an academic department. The theoretical framework's themes are educational pedagogy, course content, education openness, external assignment, contract courses, internships and network groups. An exploratory research with 9 case studies has been conducted using our own Tourism Department as the study object. It is important for academic departments to work with stakeholder related network actions organized into a tool box concept.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dennis ZalamansGustaf OnnGöran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Insights 2011, 4 (5): 52-62.

The relation of educational and community engagement activities is explored in the EU-project Tailored Applied Research System Implementation via action research case studies. The important activities found are Assignments, Internship, Alumni, and Tourism Organisation and Business Contacts. Effectiveness is assessed as educational expediency, network building and labour market partnership. Problems include: lack of resources, and serving academic and community demands simultaneously may cause quality problems.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dennis ZalamansGustaf OnnGöran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Idrottsforum.org 2011, 23 nov : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Tourism 2011, 59 (4): 447-464.

Tourism literature suggests that cities as corporate brands which can be promoted in the market and communicated to stakeholders. City tourism managers use tourism products such as festivals or other special events to promote their city as a corporate brand. This paper examines how festivals, in particular, affect the promotion and communication of a city in different market levels. A survey instrument was used to gather data from festival managers in İzmir, Turkey, in April 2009; and Göteborg, Sweden, in April 2009. The main findings indicate that managers perceive their festivals as creating community cohesiveness and strong communication among the current residents. However, they view the impact of the festivals on the promotion of the city within its country or in the international tourism market as limited. This study ultimately suggests that the festivals of İzmir are less efficient in promoting the city and that Göteborg festivals work to promote the city in Sweden and in the larger regions of Scandinavia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mehmet Cihan Yavuz

Solmaz Filiz Karabag


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

ÖNERİ: Marmara Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Enstitüsü Dergisi = Suggestions: Journal of Marmara University, Institute of Social Sciences 2010, 9 : 17-32.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Hande Özgen

Solmaz Filiz Karabag


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Sustainable Tourism Development. Tyresö : Gustav Onn.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2009

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Sustainable Tourism Development. Tyresö : Gustaf Onn.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2009

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Sustainable Tourism Development. Stockholm : Anders Steene.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Sustainable Tourism Development. Stockholm : Anders Steene.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Stockholm : Göran Andersson, 2008.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Leif Nilsson

Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

This paper discuss new expressions like Experience Economy and Dream Society, both both expressions imply that the society are now facing other demands from customers concerning tourism products. In many ways we are talking about progression ofeconomic values from teh tourist's point of view as well as from the view of the producers. In the future the producers have to focus more on making and deliver an experience for individuals then today and in older days.In the future producers have to deliver much more complex product offers then before, the complexity of the tourism product will increase and tohandle that requires a lot of knowledge as well as well trainedemployees. We will try to find out what the next step will be, from Experience Economy or Dream Society offering complexproducts - to, maybe, transformation which is an offering to the individual that he or she can be guided, the customer will be the product.To summing up the future will focus much more on individual, tailor made products and edutainment.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Steene

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: International tourism. Bratislava : University of Economics, 2007. -.

Communications during crisis is always difficult. By the time a risk turns into crisis it is too late to think about hoe to mange the communications, this has to be planned in advance. While many guidelines have been offered in crisis communications, these guidelines may prove to be pitfalls when faced with an actual crisis. This article discusses communication strategies for crises as they occur in the travel industry the study is examines the responses of a Delphi panel of industry professionals to three case studies in tourism. The study suggests that at least some of the oft-repeated guidelines may need revision and refinement. Crises are too complex in nature to prescribe a "one-size-all" remedy.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Steene

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

: NUTEK, Stiftelsen för kunskapsfrämjade inom turism, 2007. ( ; )

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Karin Dahlström

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2006. (Research Reports ; 2006:1)

Vad är ett professionellt möte, vem arrangerar, vem är kunden, vilken plats används? Hur kan infrastruktur och planering skapa bättre möten? Hur inverkar image- och relationsmarknadsföring på att sälja in platsen?Detta är några av de frågor som Göran Andersson behandlar i denna rapport, som dels är en studie av det komplexa fenomenet professionella möten, dels beskriver och förklarar förutsättningarna för professionella möten i en storstadsregion som Stockholm.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ekonomicke rozhlady 2005, 34 (1): 114-125.

This paper discuss a forecast about Swedish travel habit till year 2000, which segments of the market are supposed to demand more travel experiences and in which way are they going to travel. And furthermore is Sweden an attractive destination? The method used in this study is a modified Delphi method, which worked out very well. Finally will be discussed how much of the forecast has been fulfilled, because the initial forecast was made 1991 and the evaluation of this forecast has been made in autumn 2000.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Steene

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2005

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Haninge : Södertörns Högskola, 2004. ( ; )

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2004

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Stockholm : Centrum för Turismforskning, 2003. ( ; )

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2003

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-