Critical and Cultural Theory

Graphic element for the research area of Critical Cultural Theory

Critical and Cultural Theory is an interdisciplinary research environment that focuses on a critically motivated study of cultural artifacts and practices.

Works of art, literary and philosophical texts, media technologies, and social and political practices are the focus of research. The researchers are united by the conviction that critically informed humanities are vital for the self-understanding and scrutiny needed to address the questions of the future in contemporary society. Through its close collaboration with the Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES) at Södertörn University, themes related to this geographical area constitute an important profile area.

Publications

Publications from the DiVA publications database are listed here on an ongoing basis.
Publications

Baltic Worlds 2017, X (3): 53-62.

The article provides a closer reading of Walter Benjamin’s essays Experience and Poverty and Moscow, by juxtaposing the records of his visit to Russia in 1926–1927 with the author’s reflections on the nature of the transformations in the urban space of an early Soviet city. By using the dystopian image of Mickey Mouse as the desired inhabitant of modernity introduced by Benjamin in Experience and Poverty, Seits gives the allegorical and comparative interpretation to the substantial changes in the living space of Moscow that were witnessed by Walter Benjamin.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Seits

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and EducationSchool of Social Sciences
JournalismMedia and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

This study focuses on mediated representations of Europe during Euromaidan and the subsequent Ukraine–Russia crisis, analysing empirical material from Ukraine, Poland and Russia. The material includes articles from nine newspapers, diverse in terms of political and journalistic orientation, as well as interviews with journalists, foreign policymakers and experts, drawing also on relevant policy documents as well as online and historical sources.The material is examined from the following vantage points: Michel Foucault’s discursive theory of power, postcolonial theory, Jürgen Habermas’s theory of the public sphere, Pierre Bourdieu’s field theory, Jacques Derrida’s hauntology and Ernesto Laclau’s concept of the empty signifier. The methods of analysis include conceptual history (Reinhart Koselleck), critical linguistics and qualitative discourse analysis (a discourse-historical approach inspired by the Vienna school) and quantitative content analysis (in Klaus Krippendorff’s interpretation).The national narratives of Europe in Ukraine, Russia and Poland are characterised by a dependence on the West. Historically, these narratives vacillated between idealising admiration, materialist pragmatics and geopolitical demonising. They have been present in each country to some extent, intertwined with their own identification.These discourses of Europe were rekindled and developed on during Euromaidan (2013–2014). Nine major Ukrainian, Russian and Polish newspapers with diverse orientations struggled to define Europe as a continent, as the EU or as a set of values. Political orientation defined attitude; liberal publications in all three countries focused on the positives whereas conservative and business newspapers were more critical of Europe. There were, however, divergent national patterns. Coverage in Ukraine was positive mostly, in Russia more negative and the Polish perception significantly polarised.During and after Euromaidan, Ukrainian journalists used their powerful Europe-as-values concept to actively intervene in the political field and promote it in official foreign policy. This was enabled by abandoning journalistic neutrality. By comparison, Russian and Polish journalists were more dependent on the foreign policy narratives dispensed by political elites and more constrained in their social practice.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Fornäs

Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap 2017, 5 : 36-39.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Over the past few decades there have emerged greater possibilities for users and consumers of media to create or engage in the creation of digital media technologies. This PhD dissertation explores the ways in which the broadening of possibilities for making technologies, specifically software, has been taken advantage of by new producers of digital culture – freelancers, aspiring digital media creators and small studios – in the production of digital visual media. It is based on two empirical case studies that concern the making of free software for computer graphics animation production in two contexts: by a loose collective of anime fans in Siberia, Russia, and by a small animation studio in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The case studies are presented and analysed in the scope of four journal articles and one book chapter which form the core of the dissertation.The dissertation draws on a media practice perspective and an understanding of software as an artefact that concentrates and mediates specific infrastructural arrangements that entangle politics of technological production, economic interests and practice-related concerns. The analytical focus of the research problematises in particular practices of software decommodification and its further repair and development by non-programmers; the anchoring of software development and repair in actual production practices of computer graphics animations; and a commitment to sharing software, animations and other artefacts online as commons. The thesis combines several concepts from anthropology and science and technology studies to theorise these practices: – politics and regimes of value (Appadurai, 1986); repair and artful integrations (Jackson, 2014; Suchman, 2000); gifting (Baudrillard, 1981; Mauss, 1925/2002) and autonomy (cf Bourdieu, 1993). Bringing together these concepts, the dissertation regards them as constitutive and indicative of what I refer to as ‘media-related infrastructuring practices’, or practices in which non-programmers generate infrastructures through creating and mediating arrangements around technical artefacts like software.The results of the dissertation indicate how making free software for computer graphics media is entangled in diverse conditions of technological unevenness that may enable, but also limit, the possibilities of aspiring media creators to improve their status or work positions in the broader field of digital media.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Åker

Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: What is Sustainable Journalism?. New York : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017. 277-295.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Stiernstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

New Media and Society 2017, : 1-17.

This article discusses how alternative software infrastructures can emerge out offrictions, failure, and repair in the attempts of media creators to evade piracy. Usinga case from the geographical fringes of Russia called Morevna Project, and theoriesof infrastructures and repair, the article suggests how repair can lead to the slow,mundane and fragile formation of what I refer to as ‘situated’ digital infrastructures forcultural production. While pirate-based media production can push creators to searchfor and develop alternative infrastructures, the latter emerge as fragile frameworksthat are constantly threatened from collapse and suspension. The continuous work ofintegrating diverse interests across local and online media-related contexts and practicesbecomes an essential stabilising force needed to perpetuate these infrastructures andprevents them from falling back into oblivion.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Critical Discourse Studies 2017, : -.

An unresolved aspect of the Logics Approach within Poststructuralist Discourse Theory (PDT) is how to operationalize its abstract theoretical concepts – of social, political and fantasmatic logics – for concrete textual analysis, especially of policy documents. Policies often institute new understandings, procedures or practices, something the logics, as originally articulated, fall somewhat short of capturing. To overcome these methodological challenges this article constructs a framework for poststructuralist policy analysis that brings together the Logics Approach with more textually oriented tools developed within Critical Discourse Analysis, namely assumptions and genre chains. For empirical illustration it draws on a case study of the European Union's adaptation policy in response to climate change. The resulting framework offers a means through which more implicit social and political logics can be examined, and contributes new insights to methodological debates around the use of the Logics Approach (and PDT more broadly), specifically in relation to critical policy analysis. The article concludes with seven observations of relevance for future studies and suggests avenues for further empirical and conceptual exploration.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elise Remling

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryEnvironmental Studies

New Media and Society 2017, : -.

Research on digital activism has gained traction in recent years. At the same time, it remains a diverse and open field that lacks a coherent mode of inquiry. For the better or worse, digital activism remains a fuzzy term. In this introduction to a special issue on digital activism, we review current attempts to periodize and historicize digital activism. Although there is growing body of research on digitial activism, many contributions remain limited through their ahistorical approach and the digital universalism that they imply. Based on the contributions to the special issue, we argue for studying digital activisms in a way that traverses a two-dimensional axis of digital technologies and activist practices, striking the balance between context and media-specificity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Julie Uldam

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

New Media and Society 2017, : -.

The increased influx of refugees in 2015 has led to challenges in transition and destination countries such as Germany, Sweden and Denmark. Volunteer-led initiatives providing urgent relief played a crucial role in meeting the needs of arriving refugees. The work of the volunteers in central stations and transition shelters was mainly organised with the help of Facebook, both in terms of inward and outward communication. This article examines the role of social media for civic participation drawing on Swedish volunteer initiatives that emerged in the context of the migration crisis in 2015 as a case study. Theoretically the article provides an analytical framework including power relations, technological affordances, practices, and discourses that helps to shed light on the interrelation between social media and civic participation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Julie Uldam

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte 2017, 80 (3): 392-417.

This study investigates how the experience of reproductions – drawings, copperplate engravings, woodcuts, lithography, plaster casts, and so forth – influenced Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s conception of art in general and his descriptions of art (e.g., ekphrases, reviews, and autobiographical accounts) in particular. Well acquainted with the technologies of reproduction of his time, Goethe, often in collaboration with Johann Heinrich Meyer, acknowledged the crucial role of reproductions for the understanding of the productive idea of the original work. Experiences of reproductions and comparisons between copies, drafts, and the original enabled Goethe to grasp the idea as an ever-transforming productive constant of the continuous process of becoming of the work 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mattias Pirholt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Theories of Affect and Concepts in Generic Skills Education. Newcastle upon Thyne : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017. 111-130.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Lundberg

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Ethnologia Scandinavica 2017, 47 : 115-136.

In this article, I investigate the relation between national belonging in Sweden and religious belonging to Islam in Sweden and how that is related to the recurrent talk of respect during the guided tours of a mosque in Stockholm that I have studied. It is precisely that discussion on respect, in relation to national belonging in Sweden, which will be in focus in this article. Why has it been important to show respect on the guided tours of a mosque? What in the tours brings such issues to the fore? What personal convictions can be set aside or negotiated in the exercising of respect?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
David Gunnarsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The aim of this thesis is to explore the relation between literary expression and experience in Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy. The principal focus is Merleau-Ponty’s investigations into literature, in two of his first courses at Collège de France, 1953- 1954: Sur le problème de la parole (On the Problem of Speech) and Recherches sur l’usage littéraire du langage (Research on the Literary Use of Language). While the former remains unpublished, the latter was finally published in 2013. At the time of his premature death, Merleau-Ponty left thousands of pages of working notes. They were supposed to contribute to a major philosophical work, the planned title of which was Être et monde (Being and world). Merleau-Ponty had planned to undertake an extensive examination of language in the last part of the work. However, in the absence of this text, the courses on literary language afford us the possibility of sketching the direction that this research might have taken.The examination of literary language use is, for Merleau-Ponty, made possible by an understanding of language found in Ferdinand de Saussure’s linguistics. Merleau-Ponty’s interpretation of Saussurean linguistics anticipates the structuralist reading that was later to dominate the intellectual scene. Instead of reading the linguistics of Saussure in opposition to phenomenology, he finds in the former an ally that allows him to think Husserlian phenomenology further.In the course notes, Merleau-Ponty explores the relation between sensible experience and linguistic expressions through close readings of Proust, Valéry and Stendhal. In the writing of Marcel Proust, he finds a writer that perpetually examines his experience, searching for expressions that are capable of bringing it forth. In Stendhal’s writing, Merleau-Ponty finds a literary method that makes the world appear through the “small true facts” that describe it. Finally, in Paul Valéry’s poetic writing he finds a writer superimposing words over other words, in order to create new significations. In their literary writing he finds a capacity to seize the world anew, beyond our habitual preconceptions of it, thus bringing us closer to the experience we already perceive.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sharon Rider

Lovisa Andén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Games and Culture 2017, : -.

This article provides an analysis of the experiences of user–avatar relations and interaction of people who work in a virtual world. Earlier research often claims that relationships between users and their avatars are, by nature, strong and intense. By analyzing individuals who conducted paid labor in a number of public institutions in a virtual world, this article argues that the frame of work heavily influenced the professional users’ experiences of using an avatar. The user–avatar relationship was mainly related to how and why the user entered the virtual world, their position in their off-line and online workplaces and, as a result, related to aspects of power and control over the framing of the online arena. Because of these factors, many of the professional users regarded their avatar more as a second suit than, as has often been argued, a second self.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Augenblick, Lebenszeit, Geschichte, Ewigkeit. Heidelberg : Universitätsverlag Winter, 2017. 93-136.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mattias Pirholt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The present investigation analyses the political thought of the Czech philosopher Jan Patočka. It focuses on the question of how we are to understand political life: what are its distinguishing features and how we are to circumscribe it conceptually. According to Patočka the experience of politics is one characterized by a loss of meaning, a loss of a foundation or principle that could lend stability to our lives. It is an experience of a tremor by and through which the foundations of our experience are shaken.Philosophy’s political task is, however, not to provide any foundation for political life, but rather to address the question of why man is inclined to posit metaphysical foundations and why refuge in ideological principles is sought. Philosophy must instead engage with the groundlessness and negativity permeating human existence as such. In order to provide an analysis of human existence, and how this very groundlessness of existence is exposed in politics, Patočka calls for an “a-subjective phenomenology” that abandons the traditional notion of the subject and of subjectivity. An “a-subjective” phenomenological analysis is central for the present investigation. The author shows that it is only by and through Patočka’s a-subjective phenomenology that his political thought can be understood; out of his distinctive phenomenological analyses, the negativity, instability and groundlessness of human existence is brought to the fore. Politically, this negativity manifests itself in two phenomena, which, when taken together, constitute the very bedrock for politics: freedom and human coexistence. Human existence is neither stable nor self-sufficient.  On the contrary, it is always already exposed to others, always already engaged in the self-transcending movement of its freedom. Freedom and coexistence are in this respect two interrelated expressions of the inherent negativity of human existence and two phenomena that, accordingly, occupy a privileged position in this study. The author seeks to show that it is by way of an in-depth analysis of freedom and coexistence that the question of politics can be addressed in the work of Patočka since they give testament to the trembling, unnerving, and disorienting nature of politics.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback

Gustav Strandberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Contemporary Approaches to Ethnographic Research. : Sage Publications, 2017. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Interface: a journal for and about social movements 2017, 9 (1): 359-367.

During the last three decades processes of urban development have spread speedily across the globe, transforming hundreds of cities into primary sites for the implementation of a neoliberal agenda. As expected, this global phenomenon brings with it a number of negative consequences for the lives of disadvantaged urban residents. Privatization and commercialization of public space and housing stocks, increasing gentrification of neighbourhoods and deregulation of the housing sector are only a few examples of the adverse scenario that people from less well-off backgrounds have to face. These processes constitute capital-driven strategies that have been enforced by displacing, evicting, marginalizing and criminalizing communities who are, at the same time excluded from any participation in the decision-making process of the urban restructuring. These actions, carried out by corporations, investors and developers and closely backed up by entrepreneurial governments (Mayer, 2009) or “centaur-states” (Wacquant, 2012) are embedded in an accelerated process of accumulation by dispossession (Harvey, 2008) that has exacerbated inequality and widened the gap between the rich and the poor. The effects of this growing polarization in the distribution of power and wealth can be easilyobserved in the spatial forms of the cities, in which gated communities, glittering city centre developments and privatized areas under non-stop surveillance coexist in sharp separation with favelas, precarious and informal settlements and impoverished working class neighbourhoods (Harvey, 2012; Lipman, 2011).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katia Valenzuela - Fuentes

Anne KaunDominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Revolution och existens. Stockholm : Ersatz, 2017. 133-156.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Revolution och existens. Stockholm : Ersatz, 2017. 81-96.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marcia Cavalcante

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Revolution och existens. Stockholm : Ersatz, 2017. 115-132.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gustav Strandberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

London : Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017.

The 'end of the world' opens up philosophical questions concerning the very notion of the world, which is a fundamental element of all existential, phenomenological and hermeneutical philosophy. Is the 'end of the world' for us 'somebody's' death (the end of 'being-in-the-world') or the extinction of many or of all (the end of the world itself)? Is the erosion of the 'world' a phenomenon that does not in fact affect the notion of the world as a fundamental feature of all existential-ontological inquiry?This volume examines the present state of these concerns in philosophy, film and literature. It presents a philosophical hermeneutics of the present state of the world and explores the principal questions of the philosophical accounts of the end of the world, such as finality and finitude. It also shows how literature and cinema have ventured to express the end of the world while asking if a consequent expression of the end of the world is also an end of its expression.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Susanna Lindberg

Marcia Cavalcante

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

European Journal of Cultural Studies 2017, 20 (3): 285-306.

The proliferation and recycling of Soviet popular culture and history is a central ingredient of post-Soviet film and television production, leading to accusations that the Russian media is nurturing nostalgia. Nostalgia can hardly account for the manifold uses of the Soviet past in contemporary Russian television programming. Nevertheless, in the aftermath of the Crimean annexation, it became evident that nostalgia for a strong empire with a strong ruling hand' was part of Putin's symbolic politics for several years. Keeping these considerations in mind, this article investigates how nostalgia extends into the domain of television and becomes an element of symbolic politics, employing a case study of two documentaries produced during Putin's presidency to focus the analysis. This study also examines how contemporary Russian television uses footage and film clips from the socialist period and witness testimonies to dismantle' popular myths.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina Kalinina

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

While both public opinion and scholars around the world are currently pointing out the danger of increasingly popular life-logging devices, this book articulates this debate by distinguishing between automatic and manual life-logging approaches. Since new definitions of life-logging have excluded the latter approach and have been mainly focused on effortless life-logging technologies such as Google Glass and Quantified Self applications in general, the second part of this thesis theoretically frames life-stowing.Through extensive etymological research, I have defined life-stowing as a manual and effortful practice conducted by life-stowers, individuals who devote their life to sampling reality in predefined frameworks. As part of this book, an historical overview introduces life-stowers and distinguishes between Apollonian and Dionysian varieties of these practitioners. Lastly, in order to understand the future reception of life-stowing, particularly in relation to digital media, I have disclosed my ongoing life-stowing project to a small audience.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Stina Bengtson

Alberto Frigo

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Critical Multilingualism Studies 2017, 5 (1): 208-235.

The article proposes a new multimodal approach to literary multilingualism, with special attention devoted to how readers with different language skills partake in making literary multilingualism happen. It presents a critical assessment of previous scholarship on literary multilingualism, which we claim is characterized by monolingual assumptions and a problematic division between mono- and multilingual literature. As a continuation of the theoretical argument, multimodal readings of three contemporary poets Cia Rinne, Caroline Bergvall and Ralf Andtbacka are presented. Instances of contemporary multilingual poetry, the article concludes, can help us to critically scrutinize notions of clear-cut linguistic borders, as well as to study the intricate dynamics between the acoustic and visual aspects of literary multilingualism. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Julia Tidigs

Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The present investigation discusses the phenomenological concept of the phenomenon through an interpretation of the meaning of the negativity of the phenomenon in the philosophical works of Martin Heidegger, Jan Patočka and Eugen Fink. This negativity is thematised in terms of a loss and a privation that leads to a description of the appearing of the phenomenon as a sublime event, which exposes existence to an absence of meaning. A formulation of the absence in question as a dynamic movement of existence opens a new perspective on what it means to do phenomenology: phenomenological thinking does not begin with the immediate givenness of appearance, but through the trembling of meaning in the experience of a loss of the phenomenon.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback

Krystof Kasprzak

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Svenska Dagbladet 2017, 25 januari : 26-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mattias Pirholt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

This dissertation traces the history of a diagram. The diagram shows four circles of gradually diminishing sizes, lodged one inside the other, like the layers of a circular or spherical body. For a group of artists, curators, architects, and activists centered around Moderna Museet in Stockholm between the mid-1960s and the mid-1970s, the diagram represented a new type of museum: a museological Information Center modeled on the computer, operating as a site for radically democratic social experiments. The four layers stood for different functions: information capture, processing, interface, storage; or, put differently: social spaces and media resources, workshop floors, exhibition facilities, collection.Through close readings of a series of exhibitions and institutional projects in Sweden, the US, and France, this dissertation follows the development of this diagram: its prehistory and formulation, its different implementations, and its direct and indirect effects. It studies Moderna Museet’s original, unrealized project for Kulturhuset in Stockholm, according to which the museum should project its dynamic energies across the city center, serving as a “catalyst for the active forces in society”. It discusses the museum’s confrontation with digital technologies in the late 1960s, through pioneering museological organizations such as the Museum Computer Network in New York. It analyzes the exhibition formats developed in correspondence with the notion of the museum as a “vast experimental laboratory” and a “broadcasting station”: the exhibition as critical information pattern, as tele-commune. And it studies the diagram’s afterlife as one of the models informing the Centre Pompidou in Paris, during that project’s early phases.The Exhibitionary Complex reads these endeavors and visions as attempts to devise a critical understanding of the exhibitionary apparatus in relation to new information environments and media systems. It sheds light on a largely forgotten aspect of the exhibitionary, museological, and cultural history of the late twentieth century, in Sweden and internationally. But it also seeks to establish new models for grasping the exhibition’s singularity and potentials as a cultural and media technological form, in relation to the emergence of new information networks, as they exert increasing control over social, cultural, and political existence.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sven-Olov Wallenstein

Kim West

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The End of the World. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2017. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Media Culture and Society 2017, 39 (5): 697-714.

The cultural significance of reality television is based on its claim to represent social reality. On the level of genre, we might argue that reality television constructs a modern day panorama of the social world and its inhabitants and that it thus makes populations appear. This article presents a class analysis of the population of reality television in which 1 year of television programming and over 1000 participants have been analysed. The purpose of this analysis is to deepen our understanding of the cultural and ideological dimensions of reality television as a genre, and to give a more detailed picture of the imaginaries of class in this form of television. The results bring new knowledge about the reality television genre and modify or revise assumptions from previous studies. Most importantly, we show that upper-class people and people belonging to the social elite are strongly over-represented in the genre and appear much more commonly in reality television than in other genres. This result opens up a re-evaluation of the cultural and ideological dimensions of the reality television genre

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik StiernstedtPeter Jakobsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journalism Practice 2017, 11 (5): 544-558.

This article examines how the topic of an ethnically diverse workforce can become an organiz- ational problem (or not) in private media companies. The study is based on interviews with Human Resources managers and persons responsible for diversity issues at these companies. This article favors a communicative approach by relating structures to agency through the concept of expectation. This is in contrast to the bulk of media research, which considers structures as something fixed and objective in determining organizational action. By exploring the expec- tations structures we can see which expectation patterns condition organizational communication. As a result, the main pattern of migrant background as adding value to the organization (or not) could be revealed as a guiding distinction in organizational communication about diverse workforces. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television 2017, 37 (2): 315-332.

The sharing of expertise and know-how was an important practice in the early days of television production; delegations from national broadcasters visited each other to negotiate agreements concerning co-production and programme exchange. On one such occasion, in spring 1956, the BBC visited Soviet Central Television and their production facilities in Moscow, Leningrad and Kiev. Using that visit as vantage point, this article examines production values and professional ideologies in relation to the material spaces of television production. The article argues that the British delegation’s encounter with (un)familiar spaces of television production forced them to articulate their own production values in relation to material spaces. The final discussion suggests that the tensions provoked by the discrepancy between production values at Soviet Central Television and at the BBC may inform the main currents of television studies and television history. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Lundgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

International journal of cultural studies 2017, 20 (1): 14-30.

This article explores the way in which producers of digital cultural commons use new production models based on openness and sharing to interact with and adapt to existing structures such as the capitalist market and the economies of public cultural funding. Through an ethnographic exploration of two cases of open-source animation film production – Gooseberry and Morevna, formed around the 3D graphics Blender and the 2D graphics Synfig communities – we explore how sharing and production of commons generates values and relationships which trigger the movement of producers, software and films between different fields of cultural production and different moral economies – those of the capitalist market, the institutions of public funding and the commons. Our theoretical approach expands the concept of ‘moral economies’ from critical political economy with ‘regimes of value’ from anthropological work on value production, which, we argue, is useful to overcome dichotomous representations of exploitation or romanticization of the commons.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia VelkovaPeter Jakobsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Innovative Methods in Media and Communication Research. Cham : Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 311-320.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

S. Kubitschko

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Innovative Methods in Media and Communication Research. Cham : Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 1-12.

Kubitschko and Kaun explicate the book’s aim to actively and prolifically approach methodological challenges and opportunities by bringing together empirical research about media transformations as well as studies that do research through media. The chapter highlights that the book gathers unique insights to innovative methodological approaches in media and communication studies while embedding these in the rich history of interdisciplinary empirical research of various fields. Kubitschko and Kaun advocate an inclusive understanding of ‘innovation’ to denote the lively and productive qualities of emerging methods. Innovation here is a call for widening and rethinking research methods to further understandings of the role media technologies and infrastructures play in society. Above all, methodological innovation takes place in doing. To innovate one has to develop, apply and critically reflect on research methods.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

S. Kubitschko

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Innovative Methods in Media and Communication Research. Cham : Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 139-159.

Frigo provides an alternative way to look at lifelogging and goes as far as to propose it as an indispensable method for scholars to better sense and understand the complex media-generated landscape around them. The chapter provides a broader historical contextualization of lifelogging and deepens the contemporary discussion on everyday life increasingly governed by sensors and algorithms. Inviting media scholars to embrace technical complexity in an auto-ethnographic fashion, Frigo introduces a set of instructions on how to get started to lifelog as a research method. Lastly, the chapter presents Frigo’s own manual lifelogging methodology as a concrete example of information retrieval and subsequent knowledge production.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Alberto Frigo

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift 2016, 23 (3-4): 303-319.

(Un)comfortable (un)knowing. On comfort zones in the guided tours of a mosqueThis article, proceeding from the study I did for my thesis on the guided tours of the great mosque in Stockholm, discusses the situations that were characterized by a struggle for having the right knowledge and interpretative prerogative. The concept of comfort zone (Ahmed 2008), and how that is related to ideas of societal happiness, is central. It is a concept that opens up for analysis of how the exercise of power depends on the position of the speaker. During the tours there has been a rhetorical struggle to establish a comfort zone. The article explores the interlinking of knowledge and social positioning, and how positions decide the credibility of what is said.Acknowledging that there are regimes of truth surrounding Muslims in Sweden, the main focus lies on the production of knowledge regarding Muslims in the context of the guided tours of a mosque in Stockholm. Special attention is given to how regimes of truth regarding Muslims inform the conversations during the visits, how they are debated in this particular arena and how that is dependent on positionality. It is a situation in which a Muslim, in the position of the guide, has an opportunity to present alternative storylines, or stories, about who Muslims are and what they do.During the visits there was a tendency for the guests to feel comfortable. In spite of being guests they managed the discomfort by recreating a comfort zone brought about by the alternative storylines. Seemingly objective and established knowledge on Muslims has had such an impact that it made the Muslim guides less trustworthy, even when they talk about personal experiences and their private lives, giving the guides a position of discomfort.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
David Gunnarsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Swedish Cinema and the Sexual Revolution. Jefferson : McFarland, 2016. 185-200.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Klara Arnberg

Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal of Transnational American Studies 2016, 7 (1): 1-18.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical Studies

Stockholm : Aiolos, 2016.

Vår begeistring av texter är, det menar den österrikiska författaren Ingeborg Bachmann, egentligen en begeistring av det vita, oskrivna bladet, alltså av "en brist som är så stor att den sporrar oss att handskas med litteraturen som en utopi". Utopin som en estetisk erfarenhet av något ofullbordat och något som inte kan fullbordas går som en röd tråd genom de läsningar av Herder, Schlegel, Novalis, Hölderlin, Musil, Mann, Celan, Szondi, Bachmann och Jelinek som är samlade här. Hos dessa gestaltas det utopiska som ett ständigt någon annanstans och någon annan tid, en icke-plats i tid och rum.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mattias Pirholt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Wirkendes Wort 2016, 66 (3): 385-396.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mattias Pirholt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Гендер и СМИ [Gender and Media]. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism Lomonosov Moscow State University, 2016. 197-222.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Journalism

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Fiktion och verklighet, mångvetenskapliga möten. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Claudia Lindén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Historiens hemvist I. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 347-364.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marcia Cavalcante

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Historiens hemvist I. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 237-252.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrika Spindler

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Historiens hemvist I. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 81-112.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Claudia LindénHans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative LiteraturePhilosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Victoria Fareld

Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patricia Lorenzoni

Ulla Manns

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Historiens hemvist II. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 249-270.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Historiens hemvist II. : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 177-192.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Historiens hemvist III. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 77-106.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Staffan Ericson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2016.

This collection reflects the need for suitable methods to answer emerging questions that result from the ever-changing media environment. As media technologies and infrastructures become inseparably interwoven with social constellations, scholars from varying disciplines increasingly investigate their characteristics, functioning, relevance and impact - facing new methodological challenges as well as opportunities. Innovative Methods in Media and Communication Research engages with the substantial need to rethink established methods to research acute changes in the media environment. The book gathers chapters dedicated to the multifacetedness and liveliness of emerging methods - from lifelogging and ethnography to digital methods and visualization - while embedding them in the rich history of interdisciplinary empirical research. Innovation here is a call for widening and rethinking research methods to stimulate a sophisticated debate on and exploration of contemporary methodological approaches for scholars at various levels of academic life. Accompanied by introductory sections of prominent scholars, the majority of empirical studies gathered in this volume are accomplished through early-career scholars who strive to advance cutting-edge and in parts even provocative approaches for the study of media and communication. The book’s four sections on Materiality, Technology, Experience and Visualization are introduced by Saskia Sassen, Noortje Marres, Sarah Pink and Lev Manovich.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sebastian Kubitschko

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Nordicom Information 2016, 38 (3): 41-55.

The article proposes that social media platforms enable large volumes of user-driven circulation of media content, and argues for a combination of qualitative and quantitative considerations when analysing data from such platforms. Issues of context are vital; context must be understood both qualitatively (cultural setting) and quantitatively (statistical reference points for comparison). The authors emphasise that the possibilities of ‘big data’ should not tilt analyses so that sensitivities to subtler meanings are lost. By examining a recent research project of our own, examples are given of how topological network analysis can be successfully combined with close readings of strategically selected parts of the data and how, by doing so, context shifts can be identified that increase the reliability of the analysis. Consequently, it is recommended that mere number crunching is not enough, and that questions of ‘how,’ ‘why,’ and ‘whether’ are required in order to understand the phenomena in their societal settings. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Hammarlund

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (4): 70-82.

The concepts of social realism and new realism are developed in relation to the artworks of Lena Svedberg and Olle Kåks. A comparison between the artists’ uses of the concepts of social realism and function is presented. How the realist approach during the years around 1970 played out in the force field of society and the psyche, the collective realm and the individual, is exemplified by our two very different case studies. Svedberg’s political narratives compose mon-tages in which fictional, metaphorical figures are inserted side by side with political leaders drawn from newspaper clips. Kåks’s allegory-like oil painting shows a stone worker working in the face of his imminent disappearance. They both reveal myths as opposed to historically manifested commodity relations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Charlotte BydlerDan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Phenomenology of Pregnancy. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. 7-14.

This anthology takes its starting point in the conviction that a phenomenologyof pregnancy could play an important role in contemporary thought. Stating this is also an acknowledgment that it doesn’t play such a role—yet. The aim of this anthology is to contribute to making philosophical reflectionon pregnancy a greater part of the discussions to come.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna BornemarkNicholas Smith

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
PhilosophyStudies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Big Data and Society 2016, 3 (2): -.

This article explores the ways in which data centre operators are currently reconfiguring the systems of energy and heat supply in European capitals, replacing conventional forms of heating with data-driven heat production, and becoming important energy suppliers. Taking as an empirical object the heat generated from server halls, the article traces the expanding phenomenon of ‘waste heat recycling’ and charts the ways in which data centre operators in Stockholm and Paris direct waste heat through metropolitan district heating systems and urban homes, and valorise it. Drawing on new materialisms, infrastructure studies and classical theory of production and destruction of value in capitalism, the article outlines two modes in which this process happens, namely infrastructural convergence and decentralisation of the data centre. These modes arguably help data centre operators convert big data from a source of value online into a raw material that needs to flow in the network irrespective of meaning. In this conversion process, the article argues, a new commodity is in a process of formation, that of computation traffic. Altogether data-driven heat production is suggested to raise the importance of certain data processing nodes in Northern Europe, simultaneously intervening in the global politics of access, while neutralising external criticism towards big data by making urban life literally dependent on power from data streams.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Helene Billgren. Stockholm : Orosdi-Back, 2016. 5-12.

I artikeln diskuteras Helene Billgrens objekt, i relation till konstnärskapet i sin helhet och till några referenspunkter i konsthistorien.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Annika Öhrner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Disputed Memory. Boston : Walter de Gruyter, 2016. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical Studies

Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 2016, 3 : 89-103.

Postcolonial theory has recently come under critique as an interpretative scheme applied to Eastern Europe and particularly Ukraine. However, a closer look suggests that the critique applies only to some aspects of the approach, such as a focus on power relations and representations, while the key question should be rephrased as whether the Ukrainian subject was constituted as a colonial subject. A range of empirical material from 1920s Ukrainian discourses, both Soviet and émigré, is analyzed to shed light on how Ukrainians constructed their subjectivity as “a site of disorder” (Dipesh Chakrabarty), splitting themselves into uncultured peasant masses to be modernized and erased as a voiceless subaltern subject, on the one hand, and modernizing elites, on the other. This split can be understood as an epitome of the colonial condition.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical Studies

Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap 2016, 37 (4): 3-13.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Signe Bremer

Iwo Nord

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: En introduktion till genusvetenskapliga begrepp. Göteborg : Nationella sekretariatet för genusforskning, 2016. 61-67.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Erika Alm

Iwo Nord

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Transgender Studies Quarterly 2016, 3 (3-4): 611-617.

This article reviews Gin Müller's play Trans Gender Moves, arguing that it has translation, on several levels and in its broadest sense, at the core of its themes and aesthetics. Based on the performers’ real-life stories, Trans Gender Moves is about what it might mean to live in transition between and across genders, but also languages, cultures, and times. With a departure from their own translational experience as an audience member, the author looks at how the play connects translation to interpretation and discusses how the stage is crafted into a “translation site,” or “translocality,” where the overlapping places, times, and languages of the performers’ everyday lives are explored. It is crucial to the politics of Trans Gender Moves that all the actors, as well as the director, have themselves experienced living trans lives and that the play, by telling the life stories in the words of the people who lived them, brings trans voices into the realm of authority. Moreover, it is especially noteworthy that the performers and the audience are involved in a form of engagement that begins from multiplicity. The author suggests that the play might be used to further reflect on the challenge of how we are to escape monolingualism in transgender studies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Iwo Nord

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 2016, 51 : 35-54.

Departing from a critical assessment of the most widespread and initiated definitions of Contemporary Art from the last decade and a half, sustaining a world-wide discourse on contemporary art and contemporaneity, by Arthur Danto, Hans Belting, Peter Osborne and Terry Smith respectively, I will concentrate this talk on two aspects of an immodest proposal captured by the keywords actualization and anachrony. While current discussions on contemporary art are arguably reproducing modernist assumptions on the primacy of novelty and innovation, bolstered by a veiled avant-garde logic, the proposal to regard contemporary art as actualized art upsets not only ideas on what art after postmodernism might mean, but the whole edifice of historicist historiography. An anachronic perspective, a bi- or polychronic situatedness of the work of art, could be used to liberate art from being defined according to its unique descent, and to embrace, instead, a chronologic open to art’s continuous “life” through its successive aesthetic accessions and actualizations in time.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Historiens hemvist I. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 27-52.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research 2016, 33 (3): 515-518.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 2016, 47 (1): 83-89.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Encyclopedia of the Bible and Its Reception 2016, 12 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna Bornemark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Svenska Dagbladet 2016, Del:1 (2 mars): 24-24.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna Bornemark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Medborgardialog – om det svåra i att mötas. Stockholm : Arkus, 2016. 129-144.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna Bornemark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Medborgardialog – om det svåra i att mötas. Stockholm : Arkus, 2016. 9-17.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna Bornemark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Arkus, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna Bornemark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Att undervisa om människosyner och gudsuppfattningar. Stockholm : Liber, 2016. 169-183.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna Bornemark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Early Phenomenology . London, New York : Bloomsbury Academic, 2016. 161-179.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna Bornemark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. (RJ:s skriftserie ; 13)

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans RuinMarkus HussUlla Manns

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative LiteratureGender StudiesPhilosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Historiens hemvist II. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 129-147.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulla Manns

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Lambda Nordica 2016, 1-2 : 23-45.

Technologies always implicate their own failures, breakdowns, and glitches. The purpose of this article is to develop an understanding of gender in general – and femininity in particular – as something fundamentally technological, and, as such, broken. Drawing on the technological undercurrent in current posthumanist feminist theory, arguing for a re-introduction of technologies in the midst of feminist posthumanist critique, the author puts into play a vocabulary of malfunctioning, broken, vulnerable technologies of gender. In particular, the term “glitch” is put to use to account for machinic failures in gender within the digital domain. By using glitch as a way of theorizing gender, the article is a dual contribution to digital media studies and feminist theory in a technological vein. Glitch is the spinning wheel on the computer screen, the delay between a command given and its execution. Etymologically, glitch (possibly) derives from the Yiddish word glitsh, meaning a “slippery place” or “a slip.” Glitch signals the slipperiness of something or someone off balance and a loss of control. It usually refers to a sudden unexpected event, a surge of current or an illegitimate signal that breaks the flow of energy, information, and affect. Glitch is, fundamentally, a struggle with binary code. Gender is a similar struggle to cope with binaries, with a loss of binaries, and about what happens when the vulnerability of the system is revealed. On this side of glitch, the tendency is toward hesitation and anticipation, irritation and annoyance, as well as pain and anxiety in the face of technologies and bodies that skip, crash, or get stuck. The default mode of gender is technological failure, and cis-gender normativity – what the author calls gender “high fidelity” – an unobtainable ideal of impossible perfection. If to glitch is to slip, to stutter, to stumble, gender high fidelity is to slip by unnoticed. In contrast to the notion of cis-gender normativity as a desire to cover or remove “noise,” to clear the channel, glitch is that which infiltrate, make dirty, and ultimately put pressure on the norms and ideals that structure gender as pure, clear, cold, binary code. In this sense, glitch is also about a perceived beauty in crashing and skipping, holding an intriguing critical, aesthetic, activist potential. In the hands of glitch artists, circuit breakers, and gamers, but also queers, and trans-performers, glitch becomes a celebration of the beauty of malfunction and gender-technological fragility.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Sundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

London : Routledge, 2016.

Digital piracy cultures and peer-to-peer technologies combined to spark transformations in audio-visual distribution between the late 1990s and the mid-2000s. Digital piracy also inspired the creation of a global anti-piracy law and policy regime, and counter-movements such as the Swedish and German Pirate Parties. These trends provide starting points for a wide-ranging debate about the prospects for deep and lasting changes in social life enabled by piratical technology practices. This edited volume brings together contemporary scholarship in communication and media studies, addressing piracy as a recombinant feature of popular communication, technological innovation, and communication law and policy. An international collection of contributors highlights key debates about piracy, popular communication, and social change, and provides a lasting resource for global media studies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrick Burkart

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Migrationen i medierna. Stockholm : Institutet för mediestudier, 2016. 174-191.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Hammarlund

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Människorna, medierna & marknaden. Stockholm : Wolters Kluwer, 2016. 133-164.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Göteborg : Nationella sekretariatet för genusforskning, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Lundberg

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

London : Routledge, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Celebrity Audiences. London : Routledge, 2016. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia Johansson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Media and the Ukraine Crises. New York : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2016. 3-18.

Scholarly attention regarding the conflict between Russia and Ukraine has mainly concentrated on so-called Russian propaganda, directed both towards Russian-speaking populations and the international public, but less attention has been paid to the management of information from Ukraine. In this chapter is proposed that the conflict between Ukraine and Russia has engaged an entirely new set of actors engaged in the management of information, most notably from PR and nation branding activities, as well as journalists, oligarchs and various individuals with an interest in Ukraine’s international image. These new actors bring with them competences, ideologies and practices from their field of origin which impact on the practice and expressive character of information warfare. In this chapter we analyse three domains of communication used by Ukraine to address external audiences; the Ukraine Crisis Media Centre (UCMC), the English language news channel Ukraine Today and the fact checking website StopFake. With a focus on both individuals as well as the institutions they represent, this chapter explores the way in which actors in Ukraine have attempted to shape the content of the messages communicated.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Paul Jordan

Per Ståhlberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Politics, Civil Society and Participation. Bremen : edition lumière, 2016. 337-347.

Teaching the ethnographic approach is a challenging effort in higher education due to the increasing time constraints that characterize current academia. A debate about how to teach ethnography is therefore particularly urgent. As a contribution to foster this debate, this article presents and discusses a practical exercise, first tested at the SuSo 2015 Summer School. The method is based on taking pictures of media practices, texts and technologies in public spaces. The mediation of the camera allows students to engage with the field and to experiment with the ‘denaturalizing’ vision that generally characterizes eth-nographic approaches to media use and consumption. This reflexive stance is further fostered by a classroom discussion on the practice of observation and on the materials produced. In this way, the exercise aims at an acceptable com-promise between the reduced time available for teaching and the advantages of allowing students to personally experience the practicalities of method

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Simone Tosoni

Fredrik Stiernstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Blurring the lines. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2016. 123-131.

Native advertising is often perceived as the future of both media and advertising. Notonly is it said to lead to better, more effective advertising, it is also thought to be partof the solution to journalism’s current economic crisis. Both supporters and critics areconvinced of its future success: the transition to native is supposedly both smooth andunproblematic. This chapter seeks to nuance such accounts, using the example of Sweden.There are at least three main dilemmas, or barriers – economic, ideological/organisationaland regulatory – for those who wish to ‘go native’ or in other ways maximise theinfluence of advertising upon editorial content. Analysing them suggests some avenuesfor action, including targeted protection of particular forms of media content such asnews, and greater public support for a structurally divided media system: if commercialmedia can no longer manage to uphold a ‘wall’ within their companies, then the ‘wall’might instead run through the media system at large.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Stiernstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Polska jako peryferie. Warsaw : Wydawnictwo Naukowe SCHOLAR, 2016. 254-267.

The chapter analyses changes in the perception of Poland and Poles in the Danish press after 2009. The authors investigate three major discursive fields of narrative framing, such as freedom, progress and modernity and the field of image-building. In the conclusion a question is posed about the sustainability of the observed changes in the perception.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Dominika Bartnik-Swiatek

Kazimierz Musial

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Högre Utbildning 2016, 6 (2): 165-170.

Här presenteras en modell för att arbeta med presentationsprogrammet Prezi i seminarier. Det pedagogiska upplägget fokuserar på hur Prezi kan användas för att stimulera samarbete och interaktion mellan studenterna och synliggöra den akademiska litteracitet som seminarieformen kräver. Modellen har testats under två år på ett seminarium i textkritik på Södertörns högskola, och har utvärderats av studenterna på kursen. Texten sammanfattar reflektionerna hos såväl undervisande lärande som hos studenter och argumenterar för att digitala medier kan användas för att öka studentaktiviteten samt att synliggöra processen att tolka och diskutera texter.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ingrid Forsler

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Maria Adlercreutz, väverska mellan mörker och ljus. Stockholm : Ordfront förlag, 2016. 18-25.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Annika Öhrner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

International Journal of Communication 2016, 10 : 5395-5408.

Media technologies are crucial for the experience of time and temporality. Hence, changes in the technological configurations of the media ecology have far-reaching consequences for temporal experiences and practices. At the same time, social practices are shaping media technologies in diverse ways. One way the dialectical relationship between time and technology is expressed is the current preservation of the past for future generations. In that context the notion of the archive as practice and institution has long been central to discussions of social organization and cultural production. However, archival practices are changing with digitization. This article explores the changes in temporality of the archive through the lens of protest movements that are both objects of archiving and subjects of self-archiving practices. Combining experiences with different kinds of archives ranging from the institutional physical archive to digital archives including born-digital materials, I ask after the consequences of the changing temporalities and time regimes of the archive in terms of its politics and, ultimately, after the historicity of protest movements.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

International Journal of Communication 2016, 10 : 52016-5212.

The Special Section presents the work of the Scandinavian network Mediatization Times, which has gathered scholars with diverse backgrounds to discuss the complex relationship between time and the media. The contributions link to discussions of history and memory, liveness, and simultaneous presence as well as cultural techniques and infrastructures for temporal mediation. The section suggests that there is a renewed need to discuss temporal aspects of media and social change in the context of digital culture.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne KaunJohan FornäsStaffan Ericson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Inifrån och utifrån. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. 391-419.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Lotte Alsterdal


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Inifrån och utifrån. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. 337-366.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Beatriz Lindqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Inifrån och utifrån. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. 259-281.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Eva Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

This thesis investigates the aesthetic interpretation of learning processes in television produced and broadcast in Sweden between 1956 and 1969. The thesis explores how these programmes are linked to concepts of Bildung by their aesthetics, by which the intangible cultural heritage is entrusted in the form of oral and visual traditions, storytelling and games/play, where learning is the common denominator. The programmes are divided into three categories: aesthetics of attentiveness, aesthetics of tale/storytelling and aesthetics of play. The detailed, thick, descriptions of the programmes emanating from the close-readings shall be, together with the aesthetic categories that I have formulated and expressed in a model, regarded as the survey’s key findings. The starting point of the central theoretical model of the thesis is André Malraux’s idea of an imaginary museum of imagination in which photo reproductions can constitute a collective memory, and thus bepart of an intangible heritage. Based on this idea of ​​an imaginary museum, I have constructed a conceptual model called a medial museum, valid in its own time as well as for posterity. The theoretical models that the study gain support from are characterized by phenomenological and hermeneutical perspectives, as I refer to  a phenomenological-hermeneutical method when analysing the programmes, and at the same time underline the phenomenological-hermeneutically based aesthetics in the analysed programmes, where aesthetic interpretation of learning processes in terms of attentiveness, tale and play is of a phenomenological-hermeneutic character. For a broad perspective on learning processes, theoretical support is acquired both from the German philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer and his hermeneutic of traditions and from the French philosopher Jacques Rancière and his emancipatory ideas of pedagogy and aesthetics. Furthermore, the French philosopher Paul Ricœur and his thoughts on importance of storytelling for knowledge formation have had significant influence on the work. Regarding the concepts of play, I have made use of both Gadamer’s ideas of ​​art experience as play and of Donald W. Winnicott’s theories about play as transitional area. In the programmes’ aesthetics is found a depiction of a broadened interpretation of Bildung, where processes of learning comprise a direct sensual perceiving, attentiveness, storytelling/tale and play. Moreover, within the programmes’ managing of an intangible cultural heritage, I have found an expression of an interplay between modernity and tradition, with emphasis on the historical significance of the present, and rooting in the past of everyday life, where expectation on the future and the memory of the past can co-exist. To summarise, the study suggests the possibility to understand aesthetics as an epistemology using sensuous experience as basis for a conceptual knowledge about how to understand the world. Thereby, one can comprehend aesthetics as pedagogy per se. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jakob Staberg

Petra Werner


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Teacher Education

Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016.

Här tecknar studenter på den erfarenhetsbaserade förskollärarutbildningen, och forskare som undervisar på samma utbildning, en bild av förskolepedagogens praktiska kunskap. Texterna rör sig mellan ett förtroget inifrånperspektiv och ett teoretiskt utifrånperspektiv. Boken kombinerar på så vis en djupgående undersökning av dagsaktuella frågor som relationen mellan omsorg och lärande, det ökade antalet diagnostiserade barn, resursbrist, lek och utbildningens betydelse, samtidigt som den sätter dessa frågor i relation till vilken förskola, och vilket samhälle, vi vill ha.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Lotte Alsterdal

Maria Pröckl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The European Journal of Women's Studies 2016, : -.

In the past decades a large number of students have taken courses and degrees in Gender Studies around Europe and proceeded to find employment. This article is based on a quantitative and qualitative study carried out in 2012 of Gender Studies students in Sweden, their education and employment. The design of the study was inspired by a large European research project investigating Women’s Studies in Europe and concerned with the motives for doing Gender Studies among Swedish students, as well as who the students were, how they evaluated their Gender Studies education and what work they proceeded to after they left the university. In this article the results are discussed in terms of dilemmas: between Gender Studies’ critique of neoliberalism,employability and the former students’ wishes to be employed, and their evaluation of their studies and employment. The Swedish study is also compared with previous research in order to understand general and particular traits in Swedish Gender Studies education and employment. Analysis points to interesting contradictions within Gender Studies in relation to the labor market, student groups and employability.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Lundberg

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

First Monday 2016, 21 (10): -.

The economies of the Internet are largely driven by sharing. Much of it is often veiled in a celebratory discourse that emphasizes how sharing artifacts online through gift exchanges removes hierarchies and creates broader access to public knowledge, such as in projects of free culture and open source software development. The article critically interrogates these assumptions and the gift economy of open cultural production more generally. Using a practice called open source animation film making, developed by Blender, an organisation at the core of the largest open source 3D computer graphics community, this paper shows that the discourse surrounding free culture online has largely misunderstood the complexity and ambiguities of the economy below the cultural politics of openness. With the help of classical theories of gift and value I discuss issues of debt, obligation, status, discipline, and social hierarchies created by exchanging online a variety of digital artifacts of different value, such as software, culture, and labor. This article shows that the wealth of open cultural production relies on combining multiple dimensions of gifting with fiscal and hidden forms of capital, producing a culture of secrecy in parallel to that of openness.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The present investigation develops the notion of sociality based on Emmanuel Levinas’s thought, and proposes an understanding of sociality that resists becoming a common foundation: an un-common sociality which interrupts the reciprocal shared common, and thereby, paradoxically, makes it possible. By engaging in the larger debate on community, this work gives voice to Levinas on the question of community without a common ground, a topic and a debate where he has previously been underestimated. In this way, the aim is to reveal new directions opened up by Levinas’s philosophy in order to think an un-common sociality.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Fredrika Spindler

Ramona Rat

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Bibliotekariens praktiska kunskap. Stockholm : Regionbibliotek Stockholm, 2016. 57-74.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Eva Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Regionbibliotek Stockholm, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Eva Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

Research project "Cultural and religious diversity in primary school" investigates the pupil’s experience of cultural and religious diversity in selected schools from Sweden and Estonia,  structural factors on that experience and the effect of variation in age and family tradition. The countries represent different experiences of cultural and religious diversity.The research applies mixed methods approach. Surveys are carried out with both quantitative and qualitative components. Questionnaire data from pupils (special questionnaires for 3rd, 6th and 9th grade, it is 9-10, 12-13 and 15-16 year old pupils) is supplemented with interviews of a small number of the pupils, their teachers and parents.The paper analyses 3rd graders drawings about what makes them happy. The dawings were part  of the questionnaire about cultural and religious diversity in their everyday experience and at school. The paper answers the question, what values can be found in drawings of boys and girls aged 9-10 from different religious and ethnic backgrounds in two different countries.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Olga Schihalejev

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Comparative Religion

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Bibliotekariens praktiska kunskap. Stockholm : Regionbibliotek Stockholm, 2016. 117-126.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jan Hjalmarsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Virtual Workers and the Global Labour Market. London : Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 219-237.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Konsthistorisk Tidskrift 2016, 85 (3): 256-269.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Katarina Macleod

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Media and Communication 2016, 4 (4): 1-7.

This thematic issue presents the outcome of the 2015 ECREA Communication and Democracy Section Conference “Political Agency in the Digital Age” that was held at the Copenhagen Business School in Denmark. It problematizes changes in the configurations of political agency in the context of digital media. The articles represent a shift from an exclusive focus on political elites to the interrelation between institutionalised politics and political processes in other societal spheres in the field of media and politics research. Political agency as the main notion of the thematic issue draws attention at the (media) practices through which social actors reproduce, reorganise and challenge politics. At the same time, the issue poses questions about the structures—economic, political and social—that allow for, define and also limit these practices. The contributions gathered here suggest an understanding of agency as constituted through the use of knowledge and resources, themselves embedded within structural contexts; at the same time, agency is transformative of the structures within which it is embedded by making use of knowledge and resources in creative and often radical ways. In that context the development of digital media marks a rupture or critical juncture that allows and requires a rethinking of conditions of political agency. Accordingly the contributions critically scrutinize the role of digital media moving beyond celebratory accounts of democratizing potential of digital media. The rethinking of the grammar of political agency is at the heart of this thematic issue.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Maria Kyriakidou

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Media and Communication 2016, 4 (4): 43-52.

Free software development and the technological practices of hackers have been broadly recognised as fundamental for the formation of political cultures that foster democracy in the digital mediascape. This article explores the role of free software in the practices of digital artists, animators and technicians who work in various roles for the contempo-rary digital visual media industries. Rather than discussing it as a model of organising work, the study conceives free software as a production tool and shows how it becomes a locus of politics about finding material security in flexible capitalism. This politics is ultimately contradictory in that it extends creative and craft autonomy of digital artists but does not mobilise a critical project. Instead, it nurtures further precarious labour. Empirically, the article draws on eth-nographically collected material from the media practices of digital artists and programmers who engage with two popular free software production tools, Blender and Synfig.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The Environment in the Age of the Internet. : Open Book Publishers, 2016. 105-136.

This chapter examines ‘ordinary’ people’s media communication about environmental issues. I have chosen the example of garden blogs. They fall under the category of topic-centred blogs; themes concerning gardens/gardening are expected and communicated through narratives, comments, and images. Based on approximately 50 Swedish and German blogs and a qualitative, difference-theoretical analysis, I want to examine how they communicate ecological concerns from the angle of gardeners’ everyday ‘banalities’. To this end, I examine the communicative patterns which increase the likelihood of interconnected communication within the blogosphere, patterns which, in turn, create virtual collectives, and can support ecological roles in the garden. Blog entries relate to the blog’s own mode of operation and that of its network, meaning that the topics addressed are those that have the potential quality of ‘embracing’ all the people interested in the network. As a result, blog entries addressing ecological concerns focus on topics of consumption and production through the communication frames of pleasure, enthusiasm, and mutual agreement. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Politics, Civil Society and Participation. Bremen : edition lumière, 2016. 185-195.

Media production is today heavily computerised, and as a consequence of this, profoundly reliant on software. At the same time software does not represent a neutral artefact - it imposes certain affordances, logics, structures and hierarchies of knowledge onto the media making processes. This chapter explores the ways in which visual media creators negotiate the choices between multiple technological alternatives, and the ways in which these negotiations relate to the degree of creative autonomy experienced by cultural producers in their media practice. Combining perspectives from media studies of work in the cultural industries, and science and technology studies (STS), the paper suggests that choices of technology lead media producers to experience creative autonomy differently, by making them labour either within post-industrial technological frameworks that they do not have ownership or control over, or conversely, allow them greater ownership on technology and possibilities to mould their tools, bringing their practice closer to forms of pre-industrial craft production. Creative autonomy, I suggest, can therefore be negotiated by artists and media creators not only in relation to institutions of employment, or nation state politics, but also through deliberate choices of tools, the digital technical toolset that they select and embed in their practice; an approach largely inspired and practiced by some forms of hacker culture.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The Blackwell Companion to Hermeneutics. Chichester : Wiley-Blackwell, 2016. 114-121.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 2016, 48-49 (2013-2014) : 115-137.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Sociology of Health and Illness 2016, 38 (7): 1074-1091.

This article examines how discourses on assisted reproductive technologies are locally appropriated, translated or contested in the specific cultural and political contexts of Poland and Sweden. The aim is to investigate how two national patients' organisations, namely the Polish association Nasz Bocian and the Swedish organisation Barnlängtan, articulate rights claims in the context of reproductive technologies. To this end, we investigate how these organisations utilise specific context-dependent and affectively laden political vocabularies in order to mobilise politically, and discuss how each of these two groups gives rise to a different set of politicised reproductive identities. In order to trace which political vocabularies the respective organisations utilise to mobilise their respective rights claims, we draw primarily on political discourse theory and concepts of political grammars and empty signifiers. Lastly, we discuss which political reproductive identities emerge as a result of these different versions of political mobilisation around assisted reproductive technologies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elzbieta KorolczukJenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and EducationSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
EthnologyGender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical Studies

In: INTED2016 Proceedings. Valencia : IATED Academy.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ingrid Forsler

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

London : Zed Books, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Space and Culture 2016, 19 (4): 478-489.

Following the publication of Henri Lefebvre’s book Le Droit à la ville (1968), a debate has emerged regarding the neoliberal takeover of urban spaces and activism. Nonetheless, in the past 10 years, we have seen the continuous expansion of public space via social networking media and, today, most public institutions in Western states use social networking sites to communicate with their “citizens.” Although there are many serious problems associated with this takeover, little has been said about them so far. In this article, I address the contribution of The right to the city to this debate by analyzing a public institution which tried to establish communication with its “citizens” in an urban space in a virtual world. My analysis concludes that the users of this new media platform did not regard themselves as citizens when they were dwelling in this urban space online, but instead saw themselves as the consumers they were addressed as in this environment.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Människorna, medierna och marknaden. Stockholm : Wolters Kluwer, 2016. 189-208.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Bengt Johansson

Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Svenska Dagbladet 2016, 16 jan : 34-35.

En handfull nätjättar, som Facebook och Google, har fått mycket stor makt. Denna plattformisering påverkar hela samhället och ekonomin, och är en förändring jämförbar med fordismen eller taylorismen, skriver medieforskaren Jonas Andersson Schwarz.Plattformssamhället, del 1Ett fåtal stora aktörer har blivit alltmer dominerande på internet och i människors vardag. SvD Kultur belyser hur utvecklingen påverkar samhället, ekonomin, kulturen och människan.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Social Identities 2016, 22 (3): 274-290.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran BolinPer Ståhlberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Aiolos - tidskrift för litteratur, teori och estetik 2016, 52-53 : 131-142.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Philosophical Psychology 2016, 29 (5): 792-794.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Patrick Seniuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Pedagogik för högskolelärare. Mörklinta : Gidlunds förlag, 2016. 241-261.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Lundberg

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Television and New Media 2016, 17 (2): 124-141.

Through an interview-based study of Swedish public service broadcasting (PSB) companies, I explore the ways in which these institutions react to and interact with a set of normative conceptions of a contemporary digital media ecology characterized by social networking and personalization of the media experience. The respondents were engaged in negotiations of how to realistically maintain public values in a commercially configured online milieu. The nature of organizational adaptation within PSB is found to be complex. Several elements of the Nordic PSB model appear to counteract acquiescence to algorithmically aided personalization: its majoritarian heritage, its institutional caution toward data positivism, favoring more interpretive editorial audience knowledge, and the high costs and structural consequences of making individual users uniquely identifiable. These organizational ambitions and obstacles are embodied in recent innovations that act to mimic a personalized delivery, however, doing so without utilizing algorithmically aided prediction and instead favoring manual editorial selection.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

European Journal of Cultural Studies 2016, 19 (3): 250-264.

One component in the generational experience strongly related to media is the intimate and often passionate relation that is developed towards media technologies and content from one’s formative youth period: musical genres and stars, as well as reproduction technologies such as the vinyl record, music cassette tapes, comics and other now dead media forms. Passion, however, is a dialectic concept that not only refers to the joyful desire and intense emotional engagement of cherished objects but also includes its dialectic opposite in the form of pain and suffering. This passion, it is argued in the article, is activated by the nostalgic relationships to past media experiences, the bittersweet remembrances of media habits connected to earlier life phases of one’s own. Taking its point of departure in generational theory of Mannheim and others, this article analyses a series of focus group interviews with Swedish and Estonian media users tentatively belonging to four different generations. Based on the analysis of these interviews, it is suggested that passion and nostalgia are produced, first, in relation to old technologies, second, in relation to childhood memories and, third, at the limits of shared intergenerational experience, that is, at the moment when one realises that one’s own experiences of past media forms cannot be shared by younger generations, and especially one’s own children.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

This thesis examines the practice of haemodialysis and kidney transplantation, the two medical therapies available for persons with kidney failure, from a phenomenological perspective. A basic assumption made in the thesis is that contemporary biomedicine is deeply embedded in the cultural, historical, economic, and political circumstances provided by the particular local, national, and transnational contexts in which it is practiced. The aim of the thesis is twofold. On the one hand, the aim is to examine the forms of person- and patienthood enacted and negotiated in haemodialysis and kidney transplantation care and in the daily lives of persons with kidney failure. On the other hand, the aim is to investigate the ways in which the enacted and negotiated forms of person- and patienthood are culturally embedded and normatively charged. In order to examine and investigate this twofold aim, an empirical material has been gathered that comprises observations and in-depth interviews with patients and caregivers at four haemodialysis units, one in Riga, Latvia, and three in Stockholm, Sweden. The theoretical approach and methodology of the study is cultural and phenomenological in character, drawing on an ethnological and anthropological understanding of culture as processual and relational, and on a phenomenological understanding of personhood as embodied and intertwined with the surrounding world. The thesis shows that patients’ encounters and attempts to deal with the diagnoses and treatments associated with kidney failure are complex and often misalign them with the normatively charged orientations enacted and recommended by medicine. The complex situation that emerges when they undergo transplantation, for example, stands in stark contrast to the widespread official view of organ transplantation as a self-evidently health-bringing and normalising therapy. Through their repeated and extensive experiences of undergoing haemodialysis and living with the disease, patients eventually become able to create a synthesis between their lived experiences of their own body and their body as a medical object – what in the thesis is called a ‘sick body’ – a synthesis that allows them to reorient themselves in life and experience a sense of direction. This process relies, to a large extent, on the temporal structure that haemodialysis affords life; it is by repeatedly undergoing the treatment that patients become able to create a sick body. Even so, many of them find this temporal structure problematic; they experience it as disruptive of their control and future-orientedness and as causing an existentially difficult-to-handle boredom. The thesis also shows that the political developments and the norms prevalent in the two national contexts studied greatly affect the orientations of the treatment practices and the participants’ lives. In both Riga and Stockholm, ideals of freedom, activity, control, and self-actualisation influence what forms of patienthood and personhood are enacted. The study indicates that persons who fall ill with a serious and chronic disease only gradually become able to understand and actively cope with their differently embodied circumstances of life. This suggests that medical professionals should not too hastily enlist their patients as experts on their own bodies, but rather provide them with the time and support necessary for making repeated attempts at creating and maintaining a life with a sick body.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Susanne Lundin

Fredrik SvenaeusMartin Gunnarson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Historiens hemvist III. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 391-407.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Interactions 2016, 7 (1): 23-39.

The Occupy movement, which started with a group of activists in New York, soon grew into a global movement with protesters gathering and occupying public spaces worldwide. This article provides a critical discourse analysis and examines the representation of the global as well as local expressions of the Occupy movement in Latvian and Swedish major newspapers. It shifts the lens from the financial centres to the European periphery and asks how the movement is recontextualized in Latvia and Sweden. In the analysis four main discursive strategies are identified and discussed comparatively for the two countries; nomination, predication, perspectivation and mitigation. Although the discursive strategies in both contexts are similar, the recontextualization in Latvia and Sweden reflects the distinct historical and cultural circumstance in which the mediation of the Occupy movement emerged.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and EducationSchool of Social Sciences
Media and Communication StudiesSociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

International journal of cultural studies 2016, 19 (2): 177-192.

With the internet and digital media technology increasingly central to practices around music, this shift is often seen as contributing to a networked music use characterized by individualism. Drawing on a focus group study with young adults in Stockholm and Moscow, this article argues, however, that digital music use today is shaped by discourses of difference, with gender a significant factor both in constructions of the ideal music and technology user, and in terms of musical influence and guidance. Taking into account contemporary research on new media technology, as well as feminist studies of technology and music, the article questions ideas of a neutral user of new music technologies, showing how the gendering of music and media technology can be seen as simultaneously context-bound and cutting across geographies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia JohanssonAnn Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender StudiesMedia and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 2015, 46 (1): 135-138.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Karib - Nordic Journal for Caribbean Studies 2015, 02 : 78-97.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mirey Gorgis

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Rhetoric

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Fragment. Göteborgs universitet : SOM-institutet, 2015. 551-559.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Bengt Johansson

Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The Journal of mind and behavior 2015, 36 (3 and 4): 197-202.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Patrick Seniuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Filosofisk Tidskrift 2015, 36 (4): 30-43.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Charlotta Weigelt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Internetfonden, 2015. ( ; )

”Vad gör en politisk utsaga framgångsrik? Den användardrivna kommunikationens villkor” är ett ettårigt forskningsprojekt delfinansierat av Internetfonden, Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, Retriever AB, M-Brain AB samt Forsman & Bodenfors AB. Projektledare har varit Jonas Andersson Schwarz, som tillsammans med Johan Hammarlund, Stefan di Grado och Magnus Kjellberg har analyserat data från Twitter och rikspress i syfte att skapa ny kunskap om villkoren för politisk kommunikation i de sociala mediernas tidevarv. Huvudfokus har varit att undersöka vilka specifika faktorer som spelar in för delning av politiska tweets samt vilken typ av material från sociala medier som fångas upp av traditionella nyhetsmedier och vice versa. Samspelet mellan sociala medier och massmedier formar de bilder som görs av sociala medier i samhället, och omvänt: det formar de bilder som görs av massmedia likväl.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Hammarlund

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: A Reader on International Media Piracy. Amsterdam : Amsterdam University Press, 2015. 81-110.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing. Abingdon : Routledge, 2015. 19-34.

In this chapter I will attempt to develop a phenomenology of parts of the human body that have been removed from their site of origin but nevertheless preserve their “aliveness.” What happens when human body parts are stored in the medical laboratory and are even being transformed or cultivated there? How are we to view the ontological and ethical status of cells and organs that are being transplanted from one human body to another? Do these body parts preserve some kind of relationship to their source of origin: that is, the person from whom they have been retrieved? Do they belong to the person they originate from and, if so, in what way? What implications does this type of ownership have for ethical analysis? In some cases, at least, would the concept of sharing be more adequate in describing transfer of body parts between persons than the idea of a gift being made?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Universitetet som medium. Lund : Mediehistoria, Lunds universitet, 2015. 109-134.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Digital Politik. Göteborg : Daidalos, 2015. 39-66.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Filosofi på liv och död. Göteborg : Göteborgs förening för filosofi och psykoanalys, 2015. 219-229.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrika Spindler

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Divan 2015, 1-2 : 14-21.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

New York : Columbia University Press, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Volante, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna Bornemark

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Historiallinen Aikakauskirja 2015, 113 (2): 217-219.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulrika Dahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Afterlives of Romantic Intermediality. Lanham : Lexington Books, 2015. 95-112.

In 1811 and 1812 Clemens Brentano published two essays that seem to have almost nothing in common. Der Philister vor, in und nach der Geschichte is a political pamphlet, directed at contemporary bourgeois society, but it is also a disturbingly anti-Semitic text. “Erklärung der Sinnbilder auf dem Umschlage dieser Zeitschrift,” on the other hand, is an aesthetic text, dealing with such topics as symbolism, allegory, and mimesis. However, the Philister essay is as much a work on art as it is an ideological text, and “Erklärung der  Sinnbilder” addresses both political and aesthetic issues. The two texts have in common that they aim at unity: the unity of art and the unity of society. In other words, the idea of aesthetic unity is a political project as well, aiming at forming a unified society. The political and aesthetic unity is formed by means imitation, which enables Brentano to construct an ideal of sameness, that is, a paradoxical unity of similarity, identity, and difference. However, sameness means also the exclusion of the alien, of the Jewish in particular. Political and aesthetic sameness forms relations of identity between objects that are similar, thus excluding the dissimilar.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mattias Pirholt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Lambda Nordica 2015, 2-3 : 7-19.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jenny Björklund

Ulrika Dahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

New Formations 2015, 86 : 54-73.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulrika Dahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap 2015, 2-3 : 122-124.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Big Data & Society 2015, 2 (2): 1-12.

Intelligence on mass media audiences was founded on representative statistical samples, analysed by statisticians at the market departments of media corporations. The techniques for aggregating user data in the age of pervasive and ubiquitous personal media (e.g. laptops, smartphones, credit cards/swipe cards and radio-frequency identification) build on large aggregates of information (Big Data) analysed by algorithms that transform data into commodities. While the former technologies were built on socio-economic variables such as age, gender, ethnicity, education, media preferences (i.e. categories recognisable to media users and industry representatives alike), Big Data technologies register consumer choice, geographical position, web movement, and behavioural information in technologically complex ways that for most lay people are too abstract to appreciate the full consequences of. The data mined for pattern recognition privileges relational rather than demographic qualities. We argue that the agency of interpretation at the bottom of market decisions within media companies nevertheless introduces a ‘heuristics of the algorithm’, where the data inevitably becomes translated into social categories. In the paper we argue that although the promise of algorithmically generated data is often implemented in automated systems where human agency gets increasingly distanced from the data collected (it is our technological gadgets that are being surveyed, rather than us as social beings), one can observe a felt need among media users and among industry actors to ‘translate back’ the algorithmically produced relational statistics into ‘traditional’ social parameters. The tenacious social structures within the advertising industries work against the techno-economically driven tendencies within the Big Data economy.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran BolinJonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Parágrafo: Revista Científica de Comunicação Social 2015, 2 (3): 113-123.

O Este artigo discute o fenômeno das narrativas transmídia e das adaptações em termos da valorização deste gênero específi co de produção midiática. Aborda ainda os diferentes tipos de valor gerado na relação produção-consumo e traz informações para quem aprecia a produção de narrativa transmídia. Por meio da apresentação de dois exemplos europeus, revela que este formato, muitas vezes, aparece em ambientes de produções de serviço público de mídia, sem fi ns lucrativos, enquanto que na indústria commercial da comunicação há maior envolvimento com as elaborações multiplataformas por suas possibilidades lucrativas.This article discusses the phenomenon of transmedia storytelling and adaptations in terms of which values are produced around this specifi c kind of media production, which diff erent kinds of value that is generated in relation to its production and consumptions, and for whom the production of transmedia storytelling and adaptations is ascribed value. Against two European examples of transmedia storytelling it is argued that this narrative form oft en appear in non-profi t motivated public service production environments, whereas the commercial media industry more oft en engage in multi-platform productions, since this type of production makes it easier to meet outer demands of economic kinds.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Offentliga och privata museer i Sverige. Stockholm : Axel och Margaret Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse för allmännyttiga ändamål, 2015. 21-29.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Konsthistorisk Tidskrift 2015, 84 (4): 248-251.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Networked Affect. Cambridge, Massachusetts : The MIT Press, 2015. 135-150.

In the midst of the affective networks of contemporary digital cultures, something seemingly of the opposite order is taking shape. It is a culture that contrasts speed with slowness, displaces the new with the old and the used, and replaces supposedly immaterial streams of data with highly material, tactile technologies, materials and fabrics. This chapter turns to steampunk cultures as compelling examples of a contemporary affective investment in the analog, coupled with intense digital connectivity. Drawing on affect theory in a neo-materialist vein, the author formulates a critique of Brian Massumi’s notion of the superiority of the analog and suggests that steampunk, rather than being understood as analog nostalgia, is more aptly understood in terms of the transdigital. The term transdigital accounts for analog passions that are shaped through the digital in ways that concretely activate, but also move across the borders of, or beyond the digital. Steampunk, rather than merely being a return to a bygone era, is a re-consideration, or transing, of the (digital) present. Within this chapter, steampunk is used as an especially intriguing example of a broader tendency toward transdigital modes of using and sensing media in contemporary media landscapes.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Sundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: O Círculo Delaunay / The Delaunay Circle. Lissabon : Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, 2015. 226-240.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Annika Öhrner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

In contrast to other branches, media companies are criticized as ‘lagging behind’ in becoming ethnically diverse, and they are too slow in making progress of diversity efforts (e.g. Horsti & Hultén, 2011; Graf, 2011; Markova & McKay, 2013, Horsti et al 2014). For example, when it comes to media professionals with migrant backgrounds, the numbers are very low: Only three percent of journalists have a migrant background according to a survey of the German Journalist Association in 2007 (Poettker 2013). Especially, black television journalists in Germany are rare. There are no news anchors of African origin, and there are only a few isolated cases of entertainment programs, where black journalists are in front of a camera.This paper examines how media companies assess the importance of this issue of diverse workforce. As I am especially interested in the workforce (and not in programming), I have mainly interviewed 10 HR managers and staff who are responsible for personnel development and diversity issues within German media organizations during the fall of 2013 and the spring of 2014, and looked at their documented policies and diversity programs. In this paper, I focus on how HR managers, mainly from private media companies, observe the communication climate for diversity issues in their organization, and how they address recruitment obstacles.  More concretely, I want to explore, first, how the topic of a diverse workforce becomes an organizational problem (or not), and, second, which solutions appear and on the basis of which expectations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

r:k:m: Rezensionen, Kommunikation, Medien 2015, 20 August : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Dis-orientations. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015. 79-94.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gustav Strandberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Beyond the Divide. New York and London : Berghahn Books, 2015. 237-256.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Lundgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Kunsthåndverk 2015, 35 (3): 40-43.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna Lappalainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

American Studies in Scandinavia 2015, 47 (2): 5-27.

This article examines the appropriation and redirection of the Gothic in two contemporary Native-centered feature films that concern a history that can be said to haunt many Native North American communities today: the history of Indian boarding schools. Georgina Lightning's Older than America (2008) and Kevin Willmott's The Only Good Indian (2009) make use of Gothic conventions and the figures of the ghost and the vampire to visually relate the history and horrors of Indian boarding schools. Each of these Native-centered films displays a cinematic desire to decenter Eurocentric histories and to counter mainstream American genres with histories and forms of importance to Native North American peoples. Willmott's film critiques mythologies of the West and frontier heroism, and Lightning attempts to sensitive non-Native viewers to contemporary Native North American concerns while also asserting visual sovereignty and affiming spiritual values. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liz Kella

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
English

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Madness, Religion, and the Limits of Reason. Huddinge : Södertörn University, 2015. 177-186.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Cederberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Handbok i journalistikforskning. Lund : Studentlitteratur AB, 2015. 335-352.

Det här kapitlet behandlar journalistik och etnisk mångfald ur ett medietext-och produktionsperspektiv. Kapitlet inkluderar inte  receptionen av olika sorters medietexter som adresserar mångfaldsperspektivet, det vill säga studier som behandlar invandrarnas och de nationella minoriteternas medieanvändning. Dessa studier nämns bara i samband med att de är viktiga för att förstå framförallt historiken kring den svenska forskningen om journalistik och etnisk mångfald. Begreppet ”etnicitet” syftar på olika härkomst än den egna gruppen, som i detta kapitel är den nationella majoritetsgruppen. Som samlingsbegrepp används numera begreppet ”personer med utländsk bakgrund”som är utrikesfödda eller födda i Sverige med minst en utrikesfödd förälder (DS 2000:43). Framför allt i samband med forskningens historik inkluderas i kapitlet också nationella minoriteter som först 1999 fick officiellt erkännande i Sverige. Fokus ligger på etnisk mångfald (och inte på kulturell mångfald i sig) samt på nyhetsjournalistik i tv, radio och press. Därmed avgränsar sig kapitlet från frågor kring kön, funktionsnedsättning, sexuell läggning och ålder. Efter en överblick över de mest relevanta teorierna och internationell forskning om journalistik och etnisk mångfald ges en mer detaljerad och kronologisk överblick över svensk forskning.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Somatechnics 2015, 5 (2): 197-216.

This article takes as its point of departure the social media presence of a human musical automaton called Rabbit. As part of the US-based band Steam Powered Giraffe, Rabbit is performed by Bunny Bennett, who recently came out as a transgender woman. As a result of this shift, Rabbit is being transformed from a male automaton into a transgender female robot. The news of the transformation hit like a bomb in the emotionally invested fan base. The story of the transitioning robot is an intimate coming together of technologies, imagination, and transgender embodiment. It is a story that deserves scholarly attention for two reasons: This case offers ways of re-casting the discussion in transgender studies within a post-humanist framework of somatechnics. Secondly, it is a case which foregrounds an understanding of gender as a question of time. In focusing on transition as a continuous, open-ended process, gender is primarily understood as a temporal form which cuts or vibrates through the body in highly material, embodied ways. The domain of queer temporality is rather densely theorised, but what about trans- temporality? If queer temporality first and foremost deals with sexuality and time, what would it mean to shift the focus to gender? Drawing on Gilles Deleuze on time, this article is a contribution to the field of transgender studies on the question of trans- temporality in a technological vein.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Sundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Nordisk Østforum 2015, 29 (3): 289-312.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran BolinPer Ståhlberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2015, 1-2 : 36-37.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Radio Audiences and Participation in the Age of Network Society. London : Routledge, 2015. 137-154.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Stiernstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

Our contemporary visual culture is marked by a close connection between camphones and social media and the seamless integration of mundane and spontanous personal photography on a mass scale and networked mobile communication. One dimension of this is a flood of online images depicting the human face and showing bodies posing and gesturing in different physical and networked spaces. Many of these images belong to the generic paradigm and visual order of the selfie, i.e. portraits that one has taken of oneself, typically with a camphone to be uploaded on a social media website. To take selfies and share and comment them online is a common thing to do. Not only among young people. Also many celebrities have picked up on this technique and use it for production of celebrity and self-branding. Social media and fomats like the selfie contribute to a stronger sense of connection and even community between celebrities and fans. This is partly due to the simple fact that they share similar visual codes and online activities in the making and sharing of selfies. Potentially the selfie format can offer possibilities for self-empowerment but the genre is still strongly conditioned by deeply rooted social norms and visual conventions for how gender, age, race, sexuality is supposed to be enacted and (re)presented. This paper discusses selfies and gender in relation to contemporary celebrity culture, and juxtapose this with results from a studie of how 13-year-old Swedish school children give meaning to their selfies as a gendered practice. The paper ends with some thoughts on how celebrity-selfies and childrens own selfies can be used in a context of media literacy.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Michael Forsman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Tidskriften Respons 2015, 4 : 66-67.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Rajojen dynamiikkaa, Gränsernas dynamik, Borders under Negotiation, Grenzen und ihre Dynamik. Stockholm : University of Vaasa.

Der vorliegende Beitrag untersucht den Lyrikband notes for soloists (2009) der transnationalen Lyrikerin Cia Rinne mit einem besonderen Schwerpunkt auf der Frage der literarischen Vielsprachigkeit und der Intermedialität des Textes. Mit Ausgangspunkt in Naoki Sakais Verständnis von Übersetzung als bordering (Sakai 2009) wird die Rolle des Lesers von notes for soloists als Erzeuger sprachlicher Grenzen hervorgehoben. Hierbei funktioniert Rinnes mehrsprachiger und intermedialer Text als eine Art Partitur, die Leser verschiedener Sprachkompetenz auf unterschiedliche Weise realisieren. Es wird veranschaulicht, wie die Dynamik zwischen dem gedruckten Text und den verschiedenen artikulatorischen Möglichkeiten des Textes die Leser in eine Sphäre zwischen Sonorität und sprachlicher Artikulation versetzt; eine Sphäre, die normalerweise kleinen Kindern, die noch keine Sprache beherrschen, vorbehalten ist. Dabei wird die Kontingenz sprachlicher Grenzen ins Auge gefasst, zugleich werden jedoch auch mögliche Verbindungen zwischen verschiedenen für die Leser unbekannten bzw. bekannten Sprachen vorgeführt.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Julia Tidigs

Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

This paper explores the way in which producers of digital cultural commons use new production models based on openness and sharing to interact with and adapt to existing structures such as the capitalist market and the economies of public cultural funding. By an ethnographic exploration of two cases ofopen-source animation film production - Gooseberry and Morevna formed around the 3D graphics Blender and the 2D graphics Synfig communities we explore how sharing and production of commons generate values and relationships which trigger the move of producers, software and films between different fields of cultural production and different moral economies – those of the capitalist market, the institutions of public funding and the commons. Our theoretical approach expands the concept of 'moral economies' from critical political economy with 'regimes of value' from anthropological work on value production which we argue is useful to overcome dichotomous representations of exploitation or romanticisation of the commons.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia VelkovaPeter Jakobsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Kulturarv. Stockholm : Axelius, 2015. 121-141.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Charlotte Bydler

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Kulturarv. Stockholm : Axelius, 2015. 95-110.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Charlotte Bydler

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Kulturarv. Stockholm : Axelius, 2015. 79-93.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Katarina Macleod

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Kulturarv. Stockholm : Axelius, 2015. 53-63.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Katarina Macleod

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Axelius, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Charlotte BydlerKatarina Macleod

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: On conference website. : .

This paper explores gendering in political journalism – the perceived imprint of gender on the media portrayal of politics and politicians, as well as the processes whereby gendered media representations materialize. Gendering here is understood as an ambiguous process, which can be either discriminatory or promoting, depending on its manifestations (e.g. gender stereotypes or counter-stereotypes, gender-spotlighting or gender-aware story). Moreover, this paper suggests to study this phenomena from intersectionality perspective (Davis 2008, McCall 2005) in order to understand gendering in the framework of other discriminatory and promoting mechanisms in political news.The paper is based on forty semi-structured interviews with political journalists working for the quality press in Russia and Sweden. The choice of the countries is driven by the wish to explore the difficulties and similarities of the journalists’ conceptualizations of gendering in two very different political and cultural contexts. The paper shows that the journalists in both countries highlight the importance of not only gender mainstreaming, but diversity in the content in general as a democratic value, where gender stands in the same row with other difference-making categories (such as ethnicity, sexuality etc.). The paper highlights the difficulties and contradictions the Russian and Swedish political journalists face trying to achieve their diversity ideal. As such, the paper discusses the reasons for the “double othering” of foreign women politicians in the Russian press and the ridiculing of Russian male politicians in the Swedish press, the attempts of the Russian journalists to remain gender-neutral in the current homophobic context and their Swedish colleagues’ striving for keeping gender as an issue on the media agenda when it is being replaced from the political agenda by the discussions of race and ethnicity issues.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research 2015, 7 (2): 169-173.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research 2015, 7 (2): 197-213.

The importance of understanding gender, space and mobility as co-constructed in public space has been emphasized by feminist researchers (Massey 2005; Hanson 2010). And within feminist theory materiality, affect and emotions have been de-scribed as central for experienced subjectivity (Ahmed 2012). Music listening while moving through public space has previously been studied as a way of creat-ing a private auditory bubble for the individual (Bull 2000; Cahir & Werner 2013) and in this article feminist theory on emotion (Ahmed 2010) and space (Massey 2005) is employed in order to understand mobile music streaming. More specifi-cally it discusses what can happen when mobile media technology is used to listen to music in public space and it investigates the interconnectedness of bodies, mu-sic, technology and space. The article is based on autoethnographic material of mobile music streaming in public and concludes that a forward movement shaped by happiness is one desired result of mobile music streaming. The positive value of ‘forward’ is critically examined with feminist theory and the failed music lis-tening moments are discussed in terms of emotion and space.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Mediers känsla för kön. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2015. 155-170.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia JohanssonAnn Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender StudiesMedia and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Popular Music 2015, 34 (2): 312-317.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

MedieKultur 2015, 31 (58): 30-48.

This article aims to understand the distinctive mechanisms of digital media use, seen in relation to cultural practices at large. The empirical material is a survey study of university students at the Business Administration, Media and Communication Stud-ies, Political Science and Philosophy departments at Södertörn University, Sweden. The empirical analysis deals with the students’ digital media use and preferences, and how these are related to their broader cultural practices and preferences. Spe-cific attention is paid to the webpages the students mention in the survey, and how these are distributed among the groups. By showing detailed information on these areas, the mechanisms of difference of digital media use are revealed.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Dis-orientations. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015. 187-218.

A comparative reading of Walter Benjamin's linguistic theology and Sören Kirkegaard's theory of the revolutionary age.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The vernaculars of Communism. London : Routledge, 2015. 63-88.

Aesopian language (or Aesopian speech) is an important component of Soviet language culture, a cultureof expression under surveillance and censorhip that invented various modes of the  circumlocution and euphemization of politically sensitive topics. In this chapter, I am illustrating some of the innumerable ways of organizing communcation under the sign of (sometimes imagined) prosecution. I am describing various practices of Aesopian circumlocution and summarizing theoretical work in Soviet literary history that addressed this peculiar phenomenon in Russian and Soviet literary tradition. I am also discussing the aesthetics and politics of Aesopian language and its role as a means of expressing political dissent as this was seen by its practitioners inside the USSR and by the theorists who worked with the matters of language and power in the West.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

First Monday 2015, 20 (4): -.

This paper develops an understanding of gender as something fundamentally technological, and as such broken. Drawing on the technological undercurrent in current posthumanist feminist theory, it puts into play a vocabulary of malfunctioning, broken, vulnerable technologies, and in particular uses the term ‘glitch’ to account for machinic failures in gender within the digital domain. As an intriguing example of the technologies of (trans)gender, the core example consists of the social media presence and public transition of Isabella Bunny Bennett — a musical performer and a member of the U.S.-based band Steam Powered Giraffe. Drawing on how glitch is understood as an accidental error and a critical potential in aesthetic practices, the article is a contribution to what recently has been coined ‘glitch feminism.’

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Sundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

International Journal of Communication 2015, 9 : 792-797.

This article introduces the contributions to this special section of the journal, frames the scope of contemporary digital piracy research in the social sciences and humanities, and relates the research project to neighboring fields in communication and media studies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrick Burkart

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Los Angeles, CA : USC Annenberg Press, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrick Burkart

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Konsthistorisk Tidskrift 2015, 84 (3): 139-152.

This article concerns the Swedish law "Kulturmiljölag (1988:950)" regulating export and trade on arts and antiquities. The law states that a range of objects that may be of particular interest and "great importance" ("stor betydelse") to the nation must be licensed before being transported out of Sweden. The original objective of the law, when proposed in the 1920s, was as a means to protect privately owned objects of potential national heritage culture value.The aim of this article is to scrutinize the subtext of art the historical frameworks the law and its enforcement depend on. This regulation is controlled and formulated by the Swedish National Heritage Board who has determined that an object's age and its monetary value are the first primary guidelines for selection. This article shows how price is an unstable value for judging cultural heritage. Furthermore how cultural heritage management of arts and antiquities rests on non-transparent value judgements regarding what is and is not of historical importance. The analysis covers two case studies where one, the Sparre collection was protected by the law and the other, work by Amalia Lindegren, never could have been. These case studies show the haphazard nature of the present law and its regulations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Katarina Macleod

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Media History 2015, 21 (2): 178-191.

This article explores the relationship between historicality and historiography, with particular focus on the tension between claims of the historicality of broadcast events and later absences in broadcast historiography. It analyses two types of claims of historicality: first as a provider of images of history in the making; and second, as a kind of prototype, a forerunner of a new era in which television has a central position in a global society. Looking at the production and organization of the broadcast of Yuri Gagarin's return to Moscow in April 1961, the article argues that historiography is often too bound up in the present and remains blind to perspectives falling outside the dominant narratives of the current. The claims of being forerunners, on behalf of the agents involved in producing the broadcast, fit poorly with later historical events and are perhaps nothing more than the ruins of an anticipated future. But as such it may teach us just as much about the forgotten aspects of television history as it does about our practices of writing it.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Lundgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Memory in a Mediated World. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. 195-209.

This chapter considers a current example of an online site for the commemoration of cultural artefacts from the former GDR, the Facebook page DT64 – Das Jugendradio der DDR that is dedicated to a former youth radio station. We analyse the page not so much as an example of persistent Ostalgia, but as an illustration of how media memories are performed in our digital age entangling individual and collective memories. The chapter discusses the changing nature of media memories in the context of an altered media ecology from a media and communications perspective by looking at questions of how users experience the performance of media memories online in relation to a given infrastructure that both allows and constraints specific media-related practices.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne KaunFredrik Stiernstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Civic Engagement and Social Media. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. 111-130.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Critical Perspectives on Social Media and Protest. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015. 89-106.

Protest movements are fundamentally about the production and control of space. Whether in a discursive or physically sense protesters aim to carve out spaces that give room to their political causes. The negotiation and contestation of the production of space has potentially changed in the context of social media that connect activists over vast distances and in real time. In line with that, media scholars, urban geographers and sociologists have attributed changes in the production and perception of space to emerging media technologies that are extending the human body (McLuhan 1964), contributing to deterritorialization  (Tomlinson 1999) and space-time compression (Harvey 1990). What are then the strategies of protest movements that are actively challenging the hegemonic logic of the production of space and how are the strategies relating to communication technologies? What are the consequences of changes in the production of protest spaces for activism in terms of temporality? This chapter investigates the changes in the production of space of protest movements in the context of advancing capitalism that is increasingly based on digital communication technologies. In that sense it contributes to the discussion of how contentious politics and the production of space are changing with social media while contextualizing these changes historically by putting current protests into dialogue with previous movements and their media practices.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Passepartout - Skrifter for kunsthistorie 2015, 36 : 117-138.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marta Edling

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Popular Communication 2015, 13 (1): 87-99.

This roundtable discussion draws together researchers with an interest of overcoming purely juridical treatment of piracy in their work. Christopher Kelty and Gabriella Coleman consider the aspects of cyberculture, which conflictually engage with intellectual property rights, through various communities of technology practice, including hackers. Patricia Aufderheide and Peter Jaszi’s work on fair use addresses the growing opportunities for creators in the United States to utilize the tradition in their creative fields. Jonas Andersson Schwarz and Patrick Burkart, co-editors of this special issue, have researched user motivations and political activism around copyright and software patent reforms, partially explaining the emergence of dozens of European Pirate Parties, beginning with the Swedish Pirates in 2006.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrick Burkart

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Popular Communication 2015, 13 (1): 1-5.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrick Burkart

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

: Taylor & Francis, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrick Burkart

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Besides the Screen. : Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. 65-84.

The purpose of this chapter is to make some general conclusions from recently conducted fieldwork on one of the world’s most comprehen- sive, but also selective, communities for film swapping; I have chosen to omit the name of this community out of concern for its members. Specialist torrent sites like these are unregulated in that they are not sanctioned by the copyright industry – yet, internally, they remain highly regulated. The chapter provides an overview and a discussion of these sites, and the way these are integrated in a wider economy of film circulation, user agency, knowledge and affects. In theorizing my findings, I mainly draw on theories of culture and sociality outlined by Pierre Bourdieu. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Zhurnalistika v 2014 godu: SMI kak faktor obschestvennogo dialoga [Journalism in 2014: Media as a factor of public dialogue], Collection of theses of international scientific and practical conference Journalism 2014, Moscow: MediaMir, Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University. Moscow: MediaMir, Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University : .

Гендер в политической журналистике как вопрос демократии: российские и шведские журналисты о свободе печати и гендерном равенствеВоронова Людмила Александровна, PhD, преподаватель кафедры медиа-исследований университета Седерторн (Стокгольм, Швеция)Гендерные медиа-исследователи часто обсуждают гендерные стереотипы как проблему демократии. Так, Китцингер (Kitzinger 1998) понимает политическую журналистику как «гендер-политику», дискурсивную практику, несущую в себе потенциал как для продвижения демократического идеала гендерного равенства, так и для воспроизведения традиционных стереотипов и утверждения существующей гендерной иерархии. Калламар (Callamard 2006) предлагает считать гендерные стереотипы в СМИ особым видом цензуры, которая, как правило, действует в пользу мужчин, сокращая для женщин возможность быть объективно представленными в медиа-дискурсе. Более того, гендерное равенство, по мнению исследователей, практически рифмуется со свободой печати, причем равенство мужчин и женщин воспринимается ими как «показатель реализации настоящей и зрелой демократии» (Hermes 2013).Проведя интервью с сорока журналистами, работающими в качественных изданиях России и Швеции (интервью проводились в 2011-12 гг.), мы выяснили, что российские и шведские журналисты воспринимают свободу печати и гендерное равенство как непременные атрибуты демократии. Тем не менее, между их представлениями о балансе этих двух идеалов есть существенные различия. Так, российские журналисты находят свободу прессы гораздо более ценным элементом демократии, чем гендерное равенство, и готовы поступиться принципом продвижения последнего, если это необходимо для выполнения роли «сторожевой собаки» власти. Гендерные стереотипы, хоть и идут вразрез с демократическими идеалами качественной прессы, могут становиться одним из инструментов критики политиков. Более того, по мнению российских журналистов, политики могут использовать гендерную повестку для «обуздания» свободной прессы.Шведские журналисты не видят никакого противоречия между идеалами гендерного равенства и свободы печати, считая естественной ситуацию, когда в продвижении гендерного равенства одинаково заинтересованы и качественные издания, и власть, что позволяет им вступать в гармоничный диалог. Хотя шведские журналисты крайне критично настроены по отношению к каким-либо ограничениям относительно контента, вводимым извне, они признают необходимость тщательной проработки внутренних ограничений: так, к примеру, они внимательно прислушиваются к гендерной критике контента, поступающей не только от читателей, но и от политиков.Таким образом, и российские, и шведские журналисты считают гендер в политической журналистике вопросом демократии. Несмотря на бóльшую критичность российских журналистов по отношению к ограничениям свободы печати, их позиция защиты более уязвима, чем позиция их шведских коллег: оправдывая использование гендерных стереотипов в прессе, они поощряют и традиционное представление о гендерной иерархии в обществе, где власть воспринимается как мужчина и доминанта, а пресса как зависимая женщина. Тем не менее, позиция шведских журналистов тоже неоднозначна: воспринимая шведскую политическую и медийную систему как воплощение демократии, они перестают критически воспринимать исчезновение гендерного равенства как темы в журналистской повестке дня – факт, отмечаемый гендерными экспертами и активистами (Rönngren 2014).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift 2015, 1 : 56-62.

I artikeln görs ett försök att visa, inte hur ADHD-diagnosen har skapats av den västerländska kulturen, utan snarare hur ADHD har blivit en viktig del av vår samtida senmoderna kultur. Kulturella faktorer kan utan tvekan bidra till att en psykiatrisk diagnos blir vanligare eller ovanligare i ett samhälle över tid, och den kraftfulla ökning av antalet diagnosticerade fall av ADHD som ägt rum i Sverige och övriga västvärlden de sista trettio åren är förmodligen, åtminstone delvis, kulturell till sin natur. Men oavsett vilka de diagnosdrivande faktorerna är har neuropsykiatriska begrepp och modeller också kommit att prägla vårt sätt att uppfatta och tolka varandra som människor i olika vardagliga sammanhang under 2000-talet. På detta sätt är ADHD en kulturdiagnos och i artikeln utforskas hur ADHD-diagnosen numera inte bara är ett stigma eller ett sätt att komma i åtnjutande av resurser, utan också en form av identitet.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Routledge Companion to Hermeneutics. London : Routledge, 2015. 550-560.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The Routledge Companion to Bioethics. London : Routledge, 2015. 570-580.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The Ashgate Research Companion to Memory Studies. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. 61-74.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Sexualpolitiska nyckeltexter. Stockholm : Leopard förlag, 2015. 333-341.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Paradigmen der Kunstbetrachtung. Bern : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015. 29-40.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Medicine, Health care and Philosophy 2015, 18 (2): 267-277.

Whereas empathy is most often looked upon as a virtue and essential skill in contemporary health care, the relationship to sympathy is more complicated. Empathic approaches that lead to emotional arousal on the part of the health care professional and strong feelings for the individual patient run the risk of becoming unprofessional in nature and having the effect of so-called compassion fatigue or burnout. In this paper I want to show that approaches to empathy in health care that attempt to solve these problems by cutting empathy loose from sympathy-from empathic concern-are mistaken. Instead, I argue, a certain kind of sympathy, which I call professional concern, is a necessary ingredient in good health care. Feeling oneself into the experiences and situation of the patient cannot be pursued without caring for the patient in question if the empathy is going to be successful. Sympathy is not only a thing that empathy makes possible and more or less spontaneously provides a way for but is something that we find at work in connection to empathy itself. In the paper I try to show how empathy is a particular form of emotion in which I feel with, about, and for the other person in developing an interpretation of his predicament. The with and for aspects of the empathy process are typically infused by a sympathy for the person one is empathizing with. Sympathy can be modulated into other ways of feeling with and for the person in the empathy process, but these sympathy-replacement feelings nevertheless always display some form of motivating concern for the target. Such an understanding of empathy is of particular importance for health care and other professions dealing with suffering clients.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: BEYOND TRANSITION?. Lund : Centre for European studies (CFE) at Lund university, 2015. 11-22.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical Studies

International journal of cultural studies 2015, 18 (3): 379-383.

For a feminist scholar of technology, contemporary steampunk cultures incorporate several interesting elements. They embrace playful ways of relating to technology. They contain thrifty Do-It-Yourself strategies and ethics of recycling, linking the crafting of sexually specific bodies to imaginative time-play. They involve an intermingling of technological extensions with modes of embodiment and costuming. The corset is an emblematic Victorian, industrial technology in steampunk costuming, altering bodies and affects as well as aesthetics and politics. But how far can white, Victorian, middle-class, imperialist, corseted femininity be ‘punked’, twisted, modified, or transformed? And how much do these transpositions in and through time get caught up in a machinery of repetition rather than revision? Or are there ways of thinking the old and the new differently altogether?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Sundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Social, Health, and Communication Studies 2014, 1 (1): 62-79.

The place of Europe in post-Cold War national mythologies of different countries varies widely. In three arguably most dramatic examples, Poland rethought itself as “the somehow decentered heart of Catholic Europe” (Dayan & Katz, 1994, p. 166), while Russia gave reasons to conclude it “leaves the West” (Trenin, 2006, p. 87) and Ukraine stuck with its view of Europe as a normative example (Orlova, 2010, p. 26). To what extent does this remain true if one is to look empirically at the discourses that currently inhabit news media? This paper points out, on the example of the public discourses around Euromaidan, to how narratives of Europe are instrumentalized in political discussions in the three countries that followed very different paths since the collapse of the communist bloc. The presentation includes results of qualitative analysis based on an open coding approach; the focus rests on the most prestigious news outlets (Rzeczpospolita, Gazeta wyborcza; Izvestia, Kommersant; Dzerkalo tyzhnia, Korrespondent) but also includes important online blog platforms.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Upplysningskritik. Stockholm : Symposion Brutus Östlings bokförlag, 2014. 184-204.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Shamal Kaveh


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Radio Journal 2014, 12 (1-2): 89-109.

The aim of this article is to report, summarize and spread the results of a largescale European research project funded by EBU Radio in 2011 to map best practices in social media and European public radio, focusing on the way successful public service radio formats have incorporated social media in their production flow. The programmes have been selected for one of the following reasons: programmes that are audience leaders in their country, use innovative radio language or are youthoriented productions. The survey has been carried out by a team of ten European researchers from seven countries on a sample of 28 public radio programmes analysed for two months between January and February 2011. The research team attempted to answer the empirical question: ‘How social media are used by public service?’. Are there some common threads and shared practices among successful programmes in different countries? The team adopted an empirical approach based on social media content analysis and interviews with radio producers. This article will present the main results of this empirical research project. It will conclude with practical guidelines for public radio production and social media innovation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Tiziano Bonini

Fredrik Stiernstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal of Radio & Audio Media 2014, 21 (2): 290-306.

In music radio broadcasting, radio personalities (presenters, hosts, DJs) have traditionally been of critical importance to programming success. In this article, I seek to add to the understanding of contemporary developments within radio, especially music radio, through focusing on the presenter from a political economy perspective. How do new business models and technologies affect the performances and forms of talk developed by presenters in contemporary radio? What new roles are assigned to presenters in commercial music radio? How are work practices and labor relations affected? The article shows how media convergence has impacted the work of radio personalities in traditional broadcasting.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Stiernstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Evelina Sommenzi

Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The Returns of Antigone. Albany : SUNY Press, 2014. 281-297.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: De kunst van kritiek.. Amsterdam : Amsterdam University Press, 2014. 154-174.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Dagens Nyheter 2014, 25 december : 5-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Hammarlund

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Mooria Magasin 2014, 1 (1): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marcia CavalcanteTora Lane

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The Encyclopedia of Global Bioethics. Dordrecht : Springer, 2014. 1-10.

Phenomenology is a research tradition in German and French philosophy which has had an influence in many other fields and disciplines, recently also in medicine and nursing. The main idea of phenomenology is to study the structure and content of lived experience from the first-person perspective. This chapter provides an overview of three different ways in which phenomenology has proved useful as a method and inspiration for bioethics so far and how it could do so in the future. Phenomenological bioethics can be carried out either as an integrated part of, or as a critical perspective on, principle-based bioethics. Phenomenology can be used either to inform the application of principles by way of describing the experiences of moral dilemmas, or to criticise the contemporary set-up of bioethics and offer alternative approaches. The critical alternatives may be more or less radical in nature: offering alternative principles or abandoning the idea of application altogether. Phenomenological bioethics may also be viewed as an attempt to strengthen and thicken the philosophical anthropology implicitly present in contemporary bioethical studies by focusing on themes such as body, psyche, life, death, authenticity, suffering, vulnerability, empathy, compassion, integrity, dialogue, gift, and responsibility.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Feminist phenomenology and medicine. New York : SUNY Press, 2014. 201-221.

According to the basic idea of bodily phenomenology the body is exactly the center and vehicle of my whole existence: I am as a body which feels, acts and thinks in my different ways of making myself at home in the world. The lived body, however, is not only my most fundamental home, it is also a creature with a life of its own that harbors autonomous powers. Sometimes this autonomy of the body turns alien  in the sense that it changes my basic being at home with it (as it) into an experience of bodily alienation: the body becomes not only mine, but also other to me in an uncanny way. In the chapter some such forms of bodily uncanniness are identified and related to the example of anorexia nervosa. This analysis helps us to discern different ways in which our bodies can turn up as alien to us and what types of processes (biological, emotional-cognitive, social-cultural) the forms of otherness in question are tied to. Anorexia nervosa displays several such ways of being alienated from one’s body in an uncanny way. These include forms of alienation that can be found in somatic illness, but they also concern ways of being objectified in an everyday manner in the social world by the gazes of others, finding oneself in a cultural pattern of norms regarding the feminine, the healthy, the beautiful, and the successful. The alienating gazes of the others are soon made into a self-surveying gaze by the anorexic girl, in the process of which the image of the own body is made increasingly unrealistic and self-punishing. Anorexia, in most cases, is set off by cultural influences, but when the starvation and over-exercise have been brought into play, the malnourished body as a kind of self-defence inflicts moods that make its bearer strangely disembodied, increasingly apprehending the body as a thing, and a thing that is still not thin enough, despite its now uncannily thin look to others.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Communication for Empowerment. : Universidade Lusófona.

This paper addresses the concept of change in mediatisation theory, bringing in the dimension of temporality in two supplementary ways. Mediatisation denotes a set of social changes in the interface between communications media and other societal spheres. It is thus a truly temporal phenomenon, but it remains unclear how it actually develops over time – and how it affects time.The paper first scrutinises alternative ways to understand the temporal coordinates of mediatisation processes, and to explore the affordances of different theorisations in this respect. What does it mean to describe mediatisation as a revolutionary time shift, break or leap? What are the implications of instead depicting it in terms of long-term evolutionary processes of restructuring transition? Comparisons are made with other concepts for various forms of social change, including modernisation, globalisation and individualisation. It is hardly possible to prove one temporal perspective to be ‘correct’, but I will rather reflect on their different implications, as they have repercussions on how mediatisation is understood in terms also of its range, causes and effects.There is also another, reverse side of the interrelation between time and mediatisation: namely how mediatisation affects the time-dimension itself: how communications media restructure time consciousness, historical understanding, remembrance and forgetting. This section of the paper will refer to how Ricoeur (in Time and Narrative, 1982–1985 and Memory, History, Forgetting, 2000) analyses different technologies for culturalising or ‘humanising’ time (but also space), by linking cosmic-objective-universal with experiential-subjective-lived time through the use of calendars, generational successions, documents, archives and other intersubjective tools that mediate between the internal and the external (and similarly for spatiality). Media technologies are central to such practices, and mediatisation processes are therefore a testing ground for understanding the two-way traffic between media and time: the cultural mediation of time and the historical mediatisation of society and culture: linking the changing cultural mediation of time – and thus the mediatisation of time – to the historical-temporal aspects of mediatisation processes, as they affect the understanding of temporality itself. The aim here is thus to explore mutual determinations of time and mediatisation, and the bilateral temporal coordinates of media-related social change.The paper builds upon discussions in the Scandinavian ‘Mediatisation Times’ network funded the National Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation, and in my chapters in Mediatized Worlds (Hepp & Krotz, 2014) and Mediatization of Communication (Lundby, 2014).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Communication for Empowerment. : Universidade Lusófona.

The European Union is looking for new narratives of Europe. But which was the old one and was there really just one? Do narratives of Europe in the so-called ‘new’ east Europe offer alternatives for redefining European identity? In order to approach these issues, this paper looks at how Europe is narrated in east European popular music, focusing the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC).A wide range of symbols struggle for identifying or signifying Europe (Fornäs 2012). The post-1989 EU enlargement has intensified such redefinition efforts. Popular music offers a fascinating field for such narrative identifications, with the ESC as an influential arena, linking cultural, social and political discourses. Music matters (Hesmondhalgh 2013) to people on many influential levels, combining emotive pleasure with social interaction in ways that offer rich resources for identifying practices. Being perhaps the most successful pan-European venture, the ESC is therefore an excellent source for investigating narratives of Europe.Written within an interdisciplinary project on east European ‘Narratives of Europe’, this paper analyses songs from ESC finals since 1989. Using a methodological model for analysing narratives, inspired by Genette (1972/1980), Ricoeur (1981) and Ryan (2004), it looks for who acts in a narrative (setup), what happens in which order (process), how or in what format the story is told (mode) and what identity it constructs for Europe (meaning).More than 70 songs were chosen, 40 of them from east Europe. Preliminary results in­dicate an overwhelming dominance of one master narrative of redemptive resur­rection, with a set of sub-variants. In other contexts than the ESC, popular songs may depict Europe as an eternally happy place or as falling from greatness into misery, but the ESC format strongly favours a narrative where Europe had a glorious past but then has been deeply torn by internal strife, wars and suffering, from which it now finally will recover by uniting in mutual co-operation and love. Some variants say little or nothing about the initial golden age, some less triumphantly place the resurrection as a dream for the future, and some east European song narratives add freedom from oppression to peace after internal war as core values, but the master narrative is never really abandoned.This resurrection narrative resonates with the founding myth expressed in EU’s key symbols. The inclusion of former Soviet Bloc countries into the European integration process has given new impetus to those founding narratives, and the ESC’s east European narratives indicate important continuities between the old and the new.While offering a methodological example of narrative analysis of media texts in the seldom-studied format of televised popular music, the paper also contributes to the understanding of how east European voices construct Europe’s history and future in the processes of transformation that challenge inherited ideas of what Europe means.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Konst och lärande. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2014. 251-268.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Pröckl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Aiolos 2014, 46-47 : 127-132.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonna Lappalainen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Hans-Georg Gadamer och hermeneutikens aktualitet. Stockholm : Axl Books, 2014. 53-76.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Cederberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Feminism i rörliga bilder. Stockholm : Liber, 2014. 10-15.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulrika Dahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Provins. Norrländsk litterär tidskrift 2014, 33 (4): 17-20.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Hans-Georg Gadamer och hermeneutikens aktualitet. : Axl Books, 2014. 19-52.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Axl Books, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Communication for Empowerment. Lissabon, Portugal : ECREA.

Since the 1960-s, when gender media studies originated, a special attention of gender media scholars has been paid to the different aspects of political communication. “Gendered mediation” (Gidengil and Everitt 1999), or “gendering”, of politicians and politics is considered to have a crucial influence both on the voter recognition of female and male candidates, and political participation of women and men. Scholars have provided potential reasons, which can explain the way women and men politicians, as well as the problem of the gender imbalance in political sphere are covered in political journalism (e.g. Braden 1996, Ross 2002, Falk 2008). Despite the media institution (its logic, organization, and individual characteristics of the media producers) being defined as the key “guilty party” of the patterns revealed by the scholars, journalists have remained silent producers of the assumed “gendered mediation”.This paper turns to the political journalists’ vision of the (gendered) media portrayal of politicians and politics. Its aim is to explore the reasons of gendering in quality press, as they are conceptualized by political journalists. The study focuses on journalists working in two different cultural and political contexts – in Russia and in Sweden. The choice of the cases is driven by the wish to define the similar and different elements in the journalists’ conceptions of the reasons of gendering in different political and cultural contexts, where the two cases work as an illustration of the global tendency of mediatization of politics. The study is based on forty semi-structured interviews with political and international reporters, department- and chief-editors working for the quality press in the two countries.Based on the analytical framework suggested by Hanitzsch (2007), the paper turns to the journalists’ conceptions of gendering in relation to their concern of the professional norms and ethical standards, institutional roles, and epistemological beliefs. The concluding discussion links gendering as a component of the national culture of political journalism and the global tendency of mediatization of politics.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2014, 35 (6): 407-420.

This article develops a phenomenology of suffering with an emphasis on matters relevant to medical practice and bioethics. An attempt is made to explain how suffering can involve many different things-bodily pains, inability to carry out everyday actions, and failure to realize core life values-and yet be a distinct phenomenon. Proceeding from and expanding upon analyses found in the works of Eric Cassell and Elaine Scarry, suffering is found to be a potentially alienating mood overcoming the person and engaging her in a struggle to remain at home in the face of loss of meaning and purpose in life. Suffering involves painful experiences at different levels that are connected through the suffering-mood but are nevertheless distinguishable by being primarily about (1) my embodiment, (2) my engagements in the world together with others, and (3) my core life values. Suffering is in essence a feeling (a mood), but as such, it has implications for and involves the person's entire life: how she acts in the world, communicates with others, and understands and looks upon her priorities and goals in life. Suffering-moods are typically intense and painful in nature, but they may also display a rather subconscious quality in presenting things in the world and my life as a whole in an alienating way. In such situations, we are not focused directly upon the suffering-mood-as in the cases of pain and other bodily ailments-but rather, upon the things that the mood presents to us: not only our bodies, but also other things in the world that prevent us from having a good life and being the persons we want to be. Such suffering may in many cases be transformed or at least mitigated by a person's identifying and changing her core life values and in such a manner reinterpreting her life story to become an easier and more rewarding one to live under the present circumstances.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Participations 2014, 11 (2): 108-131.

This article discusses from an inter-cultural and inter-generational perspective the relationship between ‘objective’ media landscapes and how they are subjectively perceived among four different media generations. Based on a focus group study with media users in Sweden and Estonia of two tentative generations, the relationship between the ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’ media landscapes is analysed, as is how the landscapes produce nostalgia at the intersection of age, generation, life course and life situation. Based on the differences found in the cross-cultural and the cross-generational comparison, it is concluded that in relation to the formative years of the respondents, there are two different kinds of nostalgia produced: one individually based, focussing on childhood memories; and one social or collective, focussing on the formative years of the respondents.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2014, VII (2-3): 48-55.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stagneliusbladet 2014, 17 (2): 8-13.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Konstperspektiv 2014, 3 : 31-32.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: What Are You Working On?. Stockgholm : Valeveil Press, 2014. 171-184.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Art History 2014, 37 (5): 1005-1009.

Review of Jacques Rancière, Aisthesis: Scenes from the Aesthetic Regime of the Arts, London & New York: Verso, 2013

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

First Monday 2014, 19 (11): 5497-.

In times when media are mundane fellows that are disappearing from our consciousness; when media usage is partly habitualized and therefore invisible, looking at disconnections rather than exclusively connection enables us to develop a deeper understanding of what it means to live in mediatized worlds. Media disconnection beyond digital divide and knowledge gap is, however, rarely addressed in current studies of mediatization. This paper is an attempt to explore specific forms of disconnection in conjunction with connection enabled by media. By using forced disruption of the daily stream of online engagement as a method, the article discusses how online disconnection can contribute to an understanding of media participation and its role in the everyday lives of young adults.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Christian Schwarzenegger

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Tillsammans. Stockholm : Bokförlaget Atlas, 2014. 389-416.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Katarina Macleod

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical Studies

Ada 2014, 5 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Sundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Fernsehen. Konstanz & München : UVK Verlagsgesellschaft, 2014. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Mittfåra & marginal. Göteborg : SOM-institutet, 2014. 229-237.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Mediatization of Communication. Berlin : Mouton de Gruyter, 2014. 175-197.

In this chapter three approaches to mediatization are discussed: the institutional, the technological, and the media as world. Each of these has a different ontological and epistemological background, and it is argued that this has consequences on which questions are posed, and which kinds of answers are possible to give. For these backgrounds it is accounted, with a special focus on how these approaches theorize the relationship between media and society, how media are defined and which historical perspective is privileged. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Women in Politics and Media. New York : Bloomsbury Academic, 2014. 115-130.

This chapter focuses on the attitudes of Russian journalists toward media representations of women politicians. It seeks to answer the following questions: How does the culture of political journalism influence gendering of women politicians? And what makes the Russian culture of political journalism unique when it comes to the coverage women politicians get? The chapter addresses the journalists’ interpretations of the low number of women politicians in media content, and turns to the journalists’ reasoning behind gender spotlighting and stereotyping. Highlighting the contradictions between the ideas, practices, and ideals present in the culture of the ‘quality’ political journalism in Russia, the chapter discusses how journalists envision the future of media representations of women politicians and how this relates to the problem of gender inequality in the political realm.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The news media are expected to provide equal space to female and male political actors, promoting the idea of equal access to political power, since they are recognized as a holder of power with a social responsibility to respect gender equality. However, as previous research shows, political news coverage is characterized by so-called “gendered mediation” (Gidengil and Everitt 1999), i.e., gender imbalance, stereotypes, and a lack of discussions about gender inequality. Scholars point to media logic, organization, and individual characteristics of journalists as the main reasons for this pattern, but still very little is known about how and why gendered mediation is practiced and processed in political news.This dissertation focuses on gendering understood as the perceived imprint of gender on the media portrayal of politics and politicians, as well as the processes by which gendered representations materialize. By applying a perspective of comparative journalism culture studies (Hanitzsch 2007; Hanitzsch and Donsbach 2012), it examines the processes and modes of origin of gendering as they are perceived and experienced by journalists. The study is based on semi-structured interviews with 40 journalists working for the quality press in Russia and Sweden.The results show that the national culture of political journalism, and the context it is located within, are of crucial importance for understanding gendering and its modes of origin. Gendering may cause problems to the democratic development of society and the position of the quality press in it; however, it also offers a potential for promoting gender equality. The choice of the form of gendering does not fully depend on journalists. It depends on the contextual possibilities for journalists to fulfill the gender-ethical ideal of the quality outlet as long as they need to meet the demands of society and market, and to face the challenges of political communication.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Thomas Hanitzsch

Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Contemporary media research highlights the importance of empirically analysing the relationships between media and age, changing user patterns over the life course, and generational experiences within media discourse beyond the widely hyped buzz terms such as the ‘digital natives’, ‘Google generation’, and other digitally and technologically capable generation groups. This doctoral thesis seeks to define the ‘repertoires’ of news media that different generations use to obtain topical information and create their ‘media space’. It contributes to the development of a framework within which to analyse generational features in news audiences by putting the main focus on the cultural view of generations. This perspective was first introduced by Karl Mannheim in 1928. Departing from his legacy, generations can be better conceived as social formations that are built on self-identification, rather than equally distributed cohorts. With the purpose of discussing the emergence of various ‘audiencing’ patterns from the perspectives of age, life course and generational identity, the thesis presents Estonia – a post-Soviet Baltic state – as an empirical example of a transforming society with a dynamic media landscape which is witnessing the expanding impact of new media and a shift to digitisation.The thesis is based on data from two nationally representative cross-section surveys on media use and media attitudes (conducted during the 2002-2012 period) and focus group discussions, that are used to map similarities and differences among five generation cohorts born between 1932 and 1997 with regard to the access and use of the established news media, thematic preferences and spatial orientations of media use, and discursive approach to news formats.The findings demonstrate remarkable differences between the cohorts, suggesting that they could be merged into three main groups that represent the prevailing types of relations with the news media. Yet, the study also reveals that attitudes and behaviour (including media behaviour), are not necessarily divided by year of birth, but are more and more dispersed along individualised interests and preferences.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Göran Bolin

Signe Opermann


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Göteborg : Nationella sekretariatet för genusforskning, 2014.

Den här skriften handlar om kreativt skrivande och kritiskttänkande, två centrala kunskapsområden för genusforskningoch feministisk forskning idag. Inom genusvetenskapen, menockså i den genusforskning som bedrivs inom ramen för andraämnesområden, har kritik av vetenskapliga metoder och utgångspunktervarit grundläggande för stora delar av verksamheten.Ifrågasättandet av en universell eller objektiv vetenskaputgör själva grunden i genusvetenskapens curriculum. Som endel i en sådan vetenskapskritisk och vetenskapsutvecklandeverksamhet ingår det kreativa vetenskapliga skrivande, och kritiska tänkande, som utvecklats inom genusvetenskapen.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Lundberg

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Minneskonst. Stockholm : Bonnier, 2014. 33-43.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Topos 2014, 1 : 39-52.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

SANS 2014, 4 (4): 28-33.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Media International Australia 2014, 152 : 158-167.

In post-liberalised India, the vast population is regarded as an enormous resource to be exploited as labourers, consumers or for their knowledge. A feature of the new media economy is that newspapers, mobile phones and TV shows are not exclusively produced for the better-off among an urban middle class and, furthermore, that the mass media are increasingly making use of ‘common people’ and their lives in a multitude of places as media content. The subject of this article is whether or not this obsession with the population should be urging us to rethink the Indian media landscape in analytical terms. ‘A public’, Michael Warner argues, is a reflexive relation among strangers, constituted by attention. If the Indian population is now addressed in various new ways, is it time to reconsider the old ‘truth’ that India is an unfit case for discussions about publics?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Per Ståhlberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Post-Soviet nostalgia, generally understood as a sentimental longing forthe Soviet past, has penetrated deep into many branches of Russian popular culture in the post-1989 period. The present study investigates how the Soviet past has been mediated in the period between 1991 and 2012 as one element of a prominent structure of feeling in present-day Russian culture.The Soviet past is represented through different mediating arenas – cultural domains and communicative platforms in which meanings are created and circulated. The mediating arenas examined in this study include television, the Internet, fashion, restaurants, museums and theatre. The study of these arenas has identified common ingredients which are elements of a structure of feeling of the period in question. At the same time, the research shows that the representations of the past vary with the nature of the medium and the genre.The analysis of mediations of the Soviet past in Russian contemporary culture reveals that there has been a change in the representations of the Soviet past during the past twenty years, which roughly correspond to the two decades marked by the presidencies of Boris Yeltsin in the 1990s and of Vladimir Putin in the 2000s (including Dmitrii Medvedev's term, 2008–2012). The critical and reflective component that was present in representations of the Soviet past in the 1990s has slowly faded away, making room first for more commercial and then for political exploitations of the past. Building on Svetlana Boym's conceptual framework of reflective and restorative nostalgia, the present study provides an illustration of how reflective nostalgia is being gradually supplanted by restorative nostalgia.Academic research has provided many definitions of nostalgia, from strictly medical explanations to more psychological and socio-cultural perspectives. The present study offers examples of how nostalgia functions as a label in ascribing political and cultural identities to oneself and to others, creating confusion about the term and about what and who can rightly be called nostalgic.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Fornäs

Ekaterina Kalinina

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Gender in Focus: (New) Trends in Media. Braga : University of Minho.

Since the 1960-s, when gender media studies originated, a special attention of gender media scholars has been paid to the different aspects of political communication. “Gendered mediation” (Gidengil and Everitt 1999), or “gendering”, of politicians and politics is considered to have a crucial influence both on the voter recognition of female and male candidates, and political participation of women and men. Scholars have provided potential reasons, which can explain the way women and men politicians, as well as the problem of the gender imbalance in political sphere are covered in political journalism (e.g. Braden 1996, Ross 2002, Falk 2008). Despite the media institution (its logic, organization, and individual characteristics of the media producers) being defined as the key “guilty party” of the patterns revealed by the scholars, journalists have remained silent producers of the assumed “gendered mediation”.This paper turns to the political journalists’ vision of the (gendered) media portrayal of politicians and politics. Its aim is to explore the reasons of gendering in quality press, as they are conceptualized by political journalists. The study focuses on journalists working in two different cultural and political contexts – in Russia and in Sweden. The choice of the cases is driven by the wish to define the similar and different elements in the journalists’ conceptions of the reasons of gendering in different political and cultural contexts, where the two cases work as an illustration of the global tendency of mediatization of politics.Based on the analytical framework suggested by Hanitzsch (2007), the paper turns to the journalists’ conceptions of gendering in relation to their concern of the professional norms and ethical standards, institutional roles, and epistemological beliefs. The concluding discussion links gendering as a component of the national culture of political journalism and the global tendency of mediatization of politics.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Гендер и СМИ [Gender and Media]. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism Lomonosov Moscow State University, 2014. 117-129.

This article focuses on gendered media representations as an instrument of getting economicbenefits and a tool of interaction with readers. Based on interviews with Russian and Swedish quality press’ employees, this study shows that gendered media representations are one of the resources of the quality press’ competitiveness on the media-market. However, the choice of the gendered representations, which attract both the audiences and advertisers, is strictly context-dependent.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Medie- och informationskunnighet i Norden. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2014. 107-116.

Artikeln presenterar grundtankarna bakom konceptet medie- och informationskunnighet (MIK) och de diskussioner och argument som förts fram av Unesco och andra gällande MIK. Artikeln argumenterar för vikten av ett bildningsperspektiv på MIK- frågor.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Michael Forsman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

r:k:m: Rezensionen, Kommunikation, Medien 2014, 15/7 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Nils Dardel och den moderna tiden = Nils Dardel and the modern age. Stockholm : Moderna Museet, 2014. 54-67.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Annika Öhrner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Leopard Förlag, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulrika Dahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business 2014, 22 (4): 408-425.

This article explores three entrepreneurial ventures that have evolved in proximity to online piracy. In reviewing the respective cases of Spotify, Skype, and The Pirate Bay, the argument outlines the radically divergent strategies with which the entrepreneurs have sought to legitimise their ventures and underlying technologies. The article concludes that: 1) the context of practices labelled ‘pirate’ are paradigmatic examples of fields in which entrepreneurs must work exceptionally hard to legitimise themselves; 2) in this context, it is crucial that the role of law is analytically isolated from the role of institutionalised legitimacy; 3) success in legitimisation is largely dependent upon the entrepreneur’s ability to demonstrate that the venture is governed by ‘the natural order’ of the economy. It is further argued that piracy-proximate ventures may contribute to the entrepreneurship field, inasmuch as they teeter on the border of being considered too disruptive, and thus suffer from a ‘liability of politicalness’. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Karl Palmås

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Svenska Dagbladet 2014, 23 jun : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Media Culture and Society 2014, 36 (6): 862-877.

This article argues for a revised importance of distance, besides the much emphasized closeness, in the debate on and use of ethnographic methods in online environments. When returning to the founding fathers of ethnographic methods, distance is often put forward as a core aspect of ethnographic methods, something widely forgotten, or even rejected, in the current debate in the field. Space has been restructured by digital media technologies, and the spatial and temporal proximity of digital  media cultures present new challenges for research methodologies. Based on the author’s own experiences of ethnographic fieldwork in digital cultures, and with Henri Lefebvre’s theory of everyday life as a rhythm as vantage point, it is here argued that  distance, dialectically interlinked with closeness and proximity, should be given further attention in current research and debate on ethnographic methods used online.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Mediated Youth Cultures. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. 182-196.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

New Media and Society 2014, 16 (7): 1154-1168.

People are spending increasingly more time on social media platforms, with Facebook being the biggest and most successful. Historically, media technologies have for long been considered of importance for the structuration and the experience of time in general. In this article, we investigate the technological affordances of Facebook for the temporal experiences of its users. Relying on a case study of a Facebook page dedicated to media memories, we link user experiences to technological and institutional affordances. By doing so, we seek to answer the question of how a business model and an infrastructure that largely build on immediacy and newness are experienced and negotiated by users that engage in a multiplicity of durations and time layers in their everyday lives. Drawing on a platform analysis, in-depth interviews and a survey among the users of the page “DT64—Das Jugendradio der DDR,” we develop the concept of “social media time” while considering notions of the archive, flow, and narrative, which contribute to shedding light on how specific media technologies afford specific temporalities. We conclude by discussing the consequences for the users and society at large.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne KaunFredrik Stiernstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Mediatization of Communication. Berlin/Boston : Mouton de Gruyter, 2014. 483-504.

Popular culture is often understood as being linked to mass media and therefore also implicated in the idea of mediatization. Here this is discussed in four main steps. (1) First, key problems in the concept of mediatization are illuminated, with popular culture as a testing ground: if there is always such a mediatization process going on; when (in which periods) this process is particularly intense and how it develops over time (gradually or in leaps); where (in which world regions) it can be located; how it has any effects (if it follows a relatively fixed logic or is more diffuse); and what it affects in terms of societal spheres and levels of practice. (2) Second, four main dimensions of the concept of culture are distinguished – cultivation, life forms, aesthetics, and signifying practice – all of which are found relevant to mediatization. As media are cultural technologies of communication, there is a close link between mediatization and culturalization. (3) Third, popular culture is similarly divided into four main meanings, defining it as mass culture, people’s culture, low culture, or illegitimized culture. (4) On this basis, examples illustrate how mediatization processes affect popular culture through four main phases, each linked to a new demarcation of popular culture itself: graphic mediatization of common culture, print mediatization of low culture, audiovisual mediatization of media culture, and digital mediatization of what again is becoming a more or less indistinguishable common culture.            Popular culture frequently appears to be one of the most media-saturated spheres or fields of modern societies. It is sometimes even identified with media culture, for instance when contrasted with fine arts and folk handicrafts, and defined through its reliance on mass mediated texts disseminated by cultural industries to dispersed polymorphous audiences all over the globe. This closeness between popular culture and media processes poses a challenge for any effort to more precisely scrutinize whether there is any escalating increase in this kind of media presence, which would deserve to be labeled mediatization.            In order to bring some clarity to this slightly paradoxical situation, it is helpful to first make some conceptual groundwork. This chapter will first analyze how the concepts of media and mediatization relate to culture and culturalization. Then, a similar discussion follows of popular culture, leading up to an effort to draft a provisional sketch of key steps in the mediatization history of popular culture. This will finally also make it possible to return to the initial definition of mediatization and reconsider its very basis.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Divan 2014, 1-2 : 89-100.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The Humboldtian Tradition. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2014. 164-177.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Axel Hägerström and Modern Social Thought. Oxford : Bardwell Press, 2014. 177-202.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Ny tid 2014, 25-32 : 23-26.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

SANS 2014, 2 : 44-47.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Critique of Cosmopolitan Reason. Oxford : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014. 3-34.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov

Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2014, 7 (1): 29-41.

The postcommunist concept of transition, as it was in use during the 1990s and early 2000s, is analyzed from the viewpoint of its intellectual prehistory. The concept is partly contrasted with alternative notions, partly relocated to its antithesis of communist ideology, where “transition” actually was an established concept. Via Hegel and Lenin, the concept’s logic of asymmetry and negativity is theoretically demonstrated. One thesis is that radical versions of teleological postcommunist transitology have unconsciously reproduced an essentially communistconceptualization of change that may generate new ideological biases and misconceptions. The reconstruction of the dialectics between communist and postcommunisttransitology indicates and responds to a need for historical reflexivity.  

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical StudiesPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Oxford : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014.

Since the Enlightenment, the definition of terms such as humanity, citizenship and rights has fluctuated and these ideas continue to haverelevance for contemporary discussions of globalization from a «cosmopolitan» perspective. This volume goes back to the conception ofcosmopolitanism in Greek antiquity in order to trace it through history, resulting in an unmasking of its many myths. The concept is reconstructedwith reference not only to well-known (and some lesser known) historical thinkers of cosmopolitanism, but also to noted «anti-cosmopolitans».The first aim of the book is to display historical perspectives on a discourse which has been dominated by ahistorical presumptions. Thesecond is to critically explore alternative paths beyond the Western imagination, redefining the Enlightenment legacy and the centre-peripherydichotomy. Most notably, Eastern Europe and the Arab world are integrated within the analysis of cosmopolitanism. Within a framework ofconceptual history (Begriffsgeschichte), cosmopolitan reason is criticized from the viewpoints of comparative literature, psychoanalysis,phenomenology, postcolonialism and moral philosophy.The book’s critical approach is an attempt to come to terms with the anachronism, essentialism, ethnocentrism and anthropocentrism thatsometimes underlie contemporary theoretical and methodological uses of the term «cosmopolitanism». By adding historical and contextualdepth to the problem of cosmopolitanism, a reflexive corrective is presented to enhance ongoing discussions of this topic within as well asoutside academia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov

Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Svenska Dagbladet 2014, 28 juni : 32-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Lönn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Methods, interventions and reflections. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulla Manns

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Methods, interventions and reflections. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulla Manns

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap 2014, 35 (1): 49-71.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Lundberg

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Afro-Nordic Landscapes. New York/London : Routledge, 2014. 57-83.

In Denmark, Norway and Sweden, jazz went from being seen as radically foreign to become a seamless part of domestic culture. The conversation traces that development and displays how the national identities of these countries were, and still are, bound up with notions of race, ethnicity and culture. Yet, as the conversation also makes clear, ultimately it is a development that defies racial, ethnic or national boundaries.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Cecil Brown

Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Mediekultur 2014, 30 (56): 195-197.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Nordicom Information 2014, 36 (1): 3-7.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Liv, lust och litteratur. Göteborg/Stockholm : Makadam Förlag, 2014. 74-87.

Här utforskas genusaspekter på hur europeisk identitet förhandlas i symboler. Myten om Europa och tjuren bär på motsägelsefulla tolkningsmöjligheter. Prinsessan Europa kan ses som personifikation av kontinenten, som med våld förs bort av Zeus i tjurhamn. Alternativt kan hon uppfattas som djärvt förförisk grundare av en dynasti, vilket erbjuder en helt annan europeisk självbild. Några tycks rentav hellre identifiera sig med den potent djuriskt-gudomliga tjuren som dramats centrala aktör. Här föreslås en ambivalent strategi som fasthåller dubbelheter i såväl ärvda symboler som dagens Europaprojekt. Varje levande myt är mångtydig och utsatt för en ohejdbar verkningshistoria vars tolkningskonflikter öppnar motsägelsefulla korsvägar för identifikation. Det är viktigt att bibehålla en agens också för Europa – såväl i mytisk symbolik som i dagens vardag – och se den genusifierade herre-slav-dialektiken i det begärsspel som format nutidens Europa: Europa är flerkönat, förenat endast i sin egen mångfald.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research 2014, 6 (23): 451-471.

The goal of this article is to explore the website communication of urban activist gardeners by focusing on the concept of ritual as a heuristic category. In contrast to the majority of those doing research on ritual, I use a systems-theoretical approach in applying the concept of ritual to communication processes. I explore the role played by ritual in communication in order to answer questions such as, “What is specifically unique about the ritual mode of communicating?” and, following from this, “What function do these rituals serve in communication?” My subject, urban garden activism, is thus addressed from the perspective of media- and communication research.First, I briefly describe urban activist gardening and how communication is usually structured on their websites. Second, I present an outline of some theories and concepts of communication and ritual within media studies, and give a brief account of the systems-theoretical approach that I use. Third, I define some areas of ritual – that is, ritualized patterns of communication found in the urban activist gardeners’ empirical material – so as to provide answers regarding the means and function of ritual in communication.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Medicine, Health care and Philosophy 2014, 17 (2): 245-248.

This article is an introduction to a thematic section on the phenomenology of empathy in medicine, attempting to provide an expose of the field. It also provides introductions to the individual articles of the thematic section.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Medicine, Health care and Philosophy 2014, 17 (2): 293-299.

Empathy is a thing constantly asked for and stressed as a central skill and character trait of the good physician and nurse. To be a good doctor or a good nurse one needs to be empathic-one needs to be able to feel and understand the needs and wishes of patients in order to help them in the best possible way, in a medical, as well as in an ethical sense. The problem with most studies of empathy in medicine is that empathy is poorly defined and tends to overlap with other related things, such as emotional contagion, sympathy, or a caring personality in general. It is far from clear how empathy fits into the general picture of medical ethics and the framework of norms that are most often stressed there, such as respect for autonomy and beneficience. How are we to look upon the role and importance of empathy in medical ethics? Is empathy an affective and/or cognitive phenomenon only, or does it carry moral significance in itself as a skill and/or virtue? How does empathy attain moral importance for medicine? In this paper I will attempt to show that a comparison with the Aristotelian concept of phronesis makes it easier to see what empathy is and how it fits into the general picture of medical ethics. I will argue that empathy is a basic condition and source of moral knowledge by being the feeling component of phronesis, and, by the same power, it is also a motivation for acting in a good way.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Expressen 2014, 9 apr : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Piracy. Los Angeles, CA : Litwin Books, 2014. 217-239.

By employing a mix between qualitative and quantitative methods, we explored the ways in which file sharers themselves conceive of the future of “piracy.” A content analysis of a selection of open answers from the Research Bay study (a global file sharing survey conducted in collaboration with file-sharing site The Pirate Bay in April, 2011, with more than 75,000 respondents) revealed significant differences between active uploaders and the much larger group of respondents who regularly download files but never upload. Tropes of “community” were not particularly abundant in this corpus. The biggest singular tropes were those of unstoppability/technical resilience (“File-sharing won’t be stopped”); convenience/availability/supply; skepticism/hostility towards governmental intrusion; and—surprisingly—the trope that file sharing will eventually be integrated with the market. This latter trope was particularly common among the non-uploaders (representing the majority of Pirate Bay users) compared to the dedicated uploaders. The non-uploaders also appeared to be more disposed towards a generic belief in the progress, evolution, and a potential convergence/assimilation of technology.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Stefan Larsson

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Mediatized worlds. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. 38-53.

Mediatization has now been revived as a key concept in media studies, mainly from social sciences perspectives. This paper argues for the value of revitalizing more culturally-oriented approaches to this concept. (1) First, definitional problems are analyzed, hinting at how a cultural perspective focusing on signifying practices of meaning-making may help identifying key ‘if’, ‘when’, ‘where’, ‘what’ and ‘how’ issues of interpreting mediatization as an historical process. The idea of ‘a media age’ is scrutinized, based on a tension between conceiving mediatization as a long-term process or as a dateable historic event. This leads to proposing a model of different levels and kinds of mediatization, making use of cultural theory. (2) Second, mediatization is related to process concepts such as modernization, lifeworld colonization and reflexivity. Mediatization discourse is compared to parallel discourses on culturalization, since these two process concepts are particularly interdependent, if culture is defined as signifying practice, and media are technologies of culture. Cultural perspectives should therefore also be highly useful to mediatization theory. The meaning of culture in relation to society is discussed, arguing for a fruitful way to interrelate the two, based on a combination of cultural studies and Paul Ricoeur’s critical hermeneutics. (3) Third, the contested genealogy of the concept of mediatization is discussed, emphasizing unfortunately repressed routes through cultural research and pointing at a need to reconnect to some anthropologically and hermeneutically inspired theorizations in the early 1990s. This shows how mediatization discourse always developed in the interface between media studies and other branches of the humanities and social sciences, with a particular affinity to cultural theory. Strategic considerations end in a pledge for continued transdisciplinary dialogue as the best means for understanding mediatization today, and a promising opportunity to productively combine social and cultural perspectives.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Television and New Media 2014, 15 (4): 336-349.

This article discusses two trends in the debates about contemporary television journalism. First, journalism is said to be increasingly subsumed an economic logic, privileging entertainment before serious journalistic practices. Most often, this is framed as if entertainment is eating its way into serious journalism, affecting it negatively and thus being detrimental for the political public sphere and political reasoning. Second, it is often pointed to a changed relation between journalism and politicians, where the latter have lost some of their power, for example, in political debates. This article relates these two trends and argues, against a field model inspired by Bourdieu, that it is not entertainment that is eating its way into journalism, but the other way around: Rather than having been absorbed by entertainment, journalism has differentiated, become more autonomous as a subfield of cultural production, and has gradually come to dominate both factual and entertainment television.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: MedieSverige 2014. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2014. 39-46.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jakob Bjur

Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Göteborg : Nationella sekretariatet för genusforskning, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Lundberg

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

London & New York, NY : Routledge, 2014.

This book summarizes the role that The Pirate Bay has played during the last decade, but also connects the history of this infamous site with the emergence of legal services such as Spotify. The book also serves as an up-to-date summary of various strands of research on file sharing—particularly, user motivation and justification. — It is apparent that file sharing on the Internet has become an emerging norm of media consumption—especially among young people. This book provides a critical perspective on this phenomenon, exploring issues related to file sharing, downloading, peer-to-peer networks, "piracy," and (not least) policy issues regarding these practices. Andersson Schwartz critically engages with the justificatory discourses of the actual file-sharers, taking Sweden as a geographic focus. By focusing on the example of Sweden—home to both The Pirate Bay and Spotify—he provides a unique insight into a mentality that drives both innovation and deviance and accommodates sharing in both its unadulterated and its compliant, business-friendly forms. — Online file sharing does not only entail music files but movies, software, and e-books alike. The phenomenon has been an integral part of online life for more than a decade. From my own and other researchers' findings it is apparent that unregulated file sharing is an emergent norm—if not even a new condition to media consumption—especially among young people. In countries like the US, the UK, Sweden, and South Korea, access to high-speed broadband is commonplace; both file sharers who I have interviewed and those who speak out in online forums hold that file sharing is as natural an element online as trees would be in the forest. This original and thought-provoking book critically summarizes debates on this topic, on a level which is approachable to undergraduates, yet useful for postgraduates and senior scholars as well. The book is based on a novel approach that fuses close-range, micro observations of user behavior and reasoning with macro perspectives of political economy and infrastructural features of digitization. Through exploring the reflexive management of the self, found among media audiences, insights into more innovative modes of management in the media industries are elicited. Through merging an ontological inquiry (popularized by theorists such as Bruno Latour) with an economics of complexity and networks (popularized by theorists like Manuel Castells) new insights into both online sociality, media anthropology, and modes of accumulation can be sought. The continuity between Spotify and illegal file sharing is explored through a critical account that examines the discourses of both file sharers and industry stalwarts. Tendencies towards "information idealism" and "networked accumulation" are scrutinized; they are found to be endemic among actors striving to extract value from online, granular dissemination. In the first place, the book would suit undergraduates on courses in media and communications—especially undergrad courses in new media, and the sociology of the Internet. The book can be seen as a critical introduction, a historical overview, as well as a case study of file-sharing—explaining the infrastructures, the particular modes of media use involved; ultimately, sketching out a political economy of unregulated file-sharing, based on the current historical record, listing some observed economic repercussions, alongside potential future ones. A major secondary market would be postgraduate students, Ph.D. students, researchers, and lecturers. The great appeal with this book is that it would be of interest to several groups within academia. It would appeal both to scholars of my own subject, media and communications (especially, the history and sociology of new, digital media)—but it would appeal also to scholars of science and technology studies (STS), since the topic raises numerous interesting questions about the nature of technology, the complexity of agency and morality, while simultaneously offering a "case study," and thus some specificity in an otherwise broad, slippery subject.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Strasbourg : European Science Foundation ESF, 2014. ( ; )

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Claudia Alvares

Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Linköping : Linköping University Electronic Press, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research 2014, 6 : 15-38.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research 2014, 6 : 7-11.

With this volume, Culture Unbound celebrates its five-year anniversary. This makes a good opportunity both to look back at what we have achieved and to gaze ahead to what we have planned for the future. This new volume, which will be more extensive and ambitious than ever, thus marks a readiness and willingness to engage with some of the most acute problems and complex transformation that society faces. We hope and believe that this not only expresses the ambitions of Culture Unbound but also reflects a more general tendency within contemporary cultural research. In order to better accommodate the most recent developments within the field of cultural research, and facilitate intellectual discussion and critical analysis of contemporary issues we also plan to expand our repertoire of published material. In the coming year Culture Unbound will therefore introduce a section of texts we have chosen to call ‘Unbound Ideas’. Here we welcome academic essays and texts of a somewhat shorter format and freer approach to scholarly convention than our usual full-length research articles. These essays will take different – perhaps speculative or conjectural – positions, or give a new perspective on pressing topics or recently emerged concerns within cultural research.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Martin Fredriksson

Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

European Journal of Cultural Studies 2014, 17 (5): 489-506.

In information and media affluent societies, the critical ability of citizens is increasingly important. This is reflected in a number of political initiatives that aim at engaging citizens in questions of media content and production, often labelled as media literacy. In this context, skills related to media technologies that are often accentuated in media literacy education are a necessary but not sufficient condition for media literacy. Critical reflexivity and critical practices are crucial for media literacy and therefore in the centre of this article. This article proposes an analysis of media criticism from a citizens’ perspective. Drawing on solicited, open-ended online diaries as well as in-depth interviews with young Estonian citizens, the article applies an inductive approach to media criticism while paying attention to the specific context in which the media criticism arises.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Mediekritik. Lund : Studentlitteratur, 2014. 37-52.

Det här kapitlet handlar om hur mediernas publiker och enskilda medborgare kan göra för att vara mediekritiska, hur deras mediekritik tas emot av och kanaliseras i medierna och vilka förutsättningar för medborgerlig mediekritik som återfinns i samtiden. Kapitlet pekar på hur det kritiska förhållningssättet och den kritiska mediepraktiken blir allt viktigare i vårt samhälle. Att kritiskt reflektera över sina egna mediepraktiker och att förhålla sig kritiskt till medierna kan sägas vara en förutsättning för att vara medborgare i det moderna mediesamhället.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Universitetsläraren 2014, 2 : 30-30.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Edda Manga

Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Svenska Dagbladet 2014, 17 februari : 21-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Building Bridges. Brussels : COST, 2014. 30-33.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jakob Bjur

Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Building Bridges. Brussels : COST, 2014. 14-29.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jakob Bjur

Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Gender, Place and Culture 2014, 21 (5): 604-621.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulrika Dahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Methods for Analyzing Social Media. London : Routledge, 2014. 250-261.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andra Siibak

Michael Forsman

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Jewish Thought, Utopia and Revolution. Amsterdam / New York : Rodopi, 2014. 79-93.

This article presents the view on revolution in the writings of French-Jewish philosopher Emmanuel Levinas. Levinas is often thought of as a mainly ethical thinker, cautious regarding the political. Here, the political implication of his thought is emphasised. Levinas, the article argues, is a thinker of the revolution. His thought is also criticized in the article, however, for drawing too severe boundaries between the home and the public sphere.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Cederberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

East/West: The Scholarly Journal for History and Culture 2013, 16-17 : 203-222.

The article applies Edward Said’s theory of Orientalism to the research of the media portrayals of Ukraine and India in the Russian newspapers Trud and Izvestiya and Britain’s The Times and The Sun. The research based mainly on quantitative content analysis locates differences and similarities in the ways media deal with formerly dependent countries. Their portrayals are found out to be characterized by postcolonial condition significantly, and in Russia more so than in the UK.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Lambda Nordica 2013, 3-4 : 177-184.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Iwo Nord

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Material of Movement and Thought. Stockholm : Fireworkd editions, 2013. 145-167.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 2013, 46 : 18-34.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Svenska Dagbladet 2013, 14 maj : 25-25.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Kroppen i humanioraperspektiv. Lund : Makadam Förlag, 2013. 53-67.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Förskoletidningen 2013, 6 : 44-49.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl CederbergEva Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The challenge of the object. Nürnberg : Verlag des Germanischen Nationalmuseums.

Introduction to the Section (11) The Artefact and its Representations/Das Kunstwerk und seine Repräsentationen

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Critica(s) de arte. Murcia : Cendeac, 2013. 373-390.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Fliction. Malmö : Universus Press, 2013. 65-87.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Katarina Macleod

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical Studies

Stockholm : Axl Books, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jean-Luc Nancy

Marcia Cavalcante

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap 2013, 1 : 105-112.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulrika Dahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Communication and Media Policy in the Era of the Internet. Baden-Baden : Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 2013. 133-145.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrick Burkart

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Media Interventions. New York, NY : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013. 302-320.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Egle Rindzeviciute


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

European Studies 2013, 30 : 65-93.

This chapter responds to recent critiques of the public uses of histories of the Holocaust and communist crimes in Lithuania by exploring the creation of the Museum of Genocide Victims and Vilna Gaon Jewish Museum in Vilnius. It has become a cliche to argue that Lithuanian public sector organisations, particularly museums, emphasise the terrible legacy of communist crimes and that they tend to forget - and even actively avoid making public - information about the killings of Lithuania's Jews. Participation of ethnic Lithuanians in the Holocaust, such critiques argue, is particularly obscured. This study provides empirical data which questions this view: it brings to attention the history of Vilna Gaon Jewish Museum, the existence of which has so far been overlooked by many scholars. In addition, this chapter suggests that in order to better understand the development of museum exhibitions about difficult periods in Lithuania's past, the Holocaust and communist crimes, it is necessary to go beyond the prevailing theoretical framework which analyses museum exhibitions as representations. Given that museums are highly heterogeneous organisations, which function as a result of collaboration (but not necessarily consensus) among many different actors, it is useful to study them as public knowledge regimes, a theoretical perspective developed by Michel Foucault and his followers. This Foucauldian approach is enriched with the organisational theory of 'institutional entrepreneurs', promoted by Paul DiMagio, which focuses particularly sharply on the potentially controversial role of individuals in creating and institutionalising organisations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Egle Rindzeviciute


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: . : .

In the early 1920’s John Reith of the BBC summarized the goals that the organization still adhere to: ‘To enrich people's lives with programmes and services that inform, educate and entertain’. This chapter deals with the last of these three ambitions, and in a historically informed genre-analytical manner describes the history of Swedish television entertainment. The focus is on four important moments of disruption, and their consequences for larger generic trends. The paper exemplifies with some such productions that have been generically important and/or specific for their time (e.g. the launch of reality series Expedition: Robinson in 1997, and the start of the reality drama).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Glänta 2013, 4 : 96-103.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Dana Mustata

Lars Lundgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Central European Journal of Communication 2013, 6 (2): 219-233.

Taking Sweden as a case study, the role of public service broadcasting (PSB) is explored, with a focus on issues of data retention and innovation that accompany web distribution. The issue of predicting audience preferences by means of data retention is investigated, and the related problem of organizational autonomy when interacting with commercial actors in the digital sphere. We hypothesize that previous tendencies towards paternalism might be equally supplemented by tendencies towards so-called “panspectric” surveillance and tracking, given a technological environment where such practices are increasingly common. We argue that the absence of advertising partially helps keep these broadcasters from panspectric temptation. Still, practices such as Facebook integration entail a panspectric element. We ask whether the potential increase in the efficacy of targeting audiences promised by panspectric practices might be offset by its negative impact on civic accountability. Is there a possibility for a “benign,” democratically accountable panspectrocism?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Karl Palmås

Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Glänta 2013, 13 (4): 13-19.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Linus Andersson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research 2013, 5 : 213-237.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Claudia Lindén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Förskoletidningen 2013, 6 : 44-49.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl CederbergEva Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Trust and organizations. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. 19-39.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Till vilken nytta. Göteborg : Daidalos, 2013. 27-33.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: A History of Swedish Broadcasting. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2013. 261-281.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift 2013, 1 : 56-60.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Paul in the Grip of the Philosophers. Minneapolis, MN : Fortress Press, 2013. 91-115.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Facets on Identity. Copenhagen : Baltic Development Forum, 2013. 12-16.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Ersatz Förlag, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Medie- och informationskunnighet i nätverkssamhället. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2013. 77-84.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Michael Forsman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Medie- och informationskunnighet i nätverkssamhället. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2013. 11-50.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Michael Forsman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Russian literature 2013, 73 (4): 591-617.

The article presents a reading of Marina Tsvetaeva's 'Poema lestnitsy' (1926) as a critique of the reifying ontology of modern society. The back staircase of the poor becomes the locus of a burning lyrical revolt by the elemental nature of things against their objectifying use. I argue that the poem's social and lyrical pathos was inspired by Vladimir Maiakovskii's 'Oblako v shtanakh' (1914-1915), but that the theme may also be related to a Modernist ontological debate. The poem presents a metapoetic image of the elemental, non-reifiable poetic world and its resistance to commodification.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Tora Lane

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Scando-Slavica 2013, 59 (1): 58-79.

This article discusses the demonic poetics that the Russian Modernist poet Marina Cvetaeva develops in a series of articles that she wrote in the 1930s, with particular focus on The Devil (1935) and Puškin and Pugačev (1936-1937). I examine the demonology as a means of treating the question of the nature of poetic language. I relate this question to the notion of a Poetry of Intent that Cvetaeva developed in 1924, and to the Romantic tradition as a ground for her Modernist poetics. The central question that governs Cvetaeva's demonic mythologizations is what it is that separates literature, conceived as poetry or romance, from other forms of speaking or imagining the world. I show that Cvetaeva gives more or less the same answer to this question in all these essays, and that is that literature in a secret and oblique way can speak of living life, that is, life in its living form, beyond the categories of representation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Tora Lane

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Poznan Slavic Studies 2013, 4 : 239-251.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Tora Lane

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research 2013, 21 (4): 407-417.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

: Intellect Ltd., 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Northern Lights 2013, 11 (1): 3-14.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Eli Skogerbø

Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Nordicom Information 2013, 1-2 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Television Aesthetics and Style. London, New York : Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. 269-276.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Linus Andersson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The Routledge International Handbook of Children, Adolescents and Media. London : Routledge, 2013. 442-450.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Von Feilitzen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Critical and Cultural Theory

Göteborg : Nordicom, Göteborgs universitet, 2013. ( ; )

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Olle Findahl

Cecilia Von Feilitzen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Critical and Cultural Theory

Northern Lights 2013, 11 (1): 123-146.

The role that age and generation play in shaping patterns of (news) media consumption is a particularly significant issue in current media studies. By virtue of the interplay of the theoretical concept of generations and the critical study of language, the article, empirically rooted in the Estonian context, seeks to outline the ways in which language reflects some media-related practices and perspectives. Analysing qualitative data from focus groups conducted in autumn/winter 2011 among Estonian media users aged 16–72, the article attempts to shed light on the complex nature of the generational consciousness that manifests itself through interaction with people of the same age and with a socially shared framework in terms of the perception of news media’s role, as well as the adoption of novel forms of media and technologies. A specific focus is on four generations who reached their ‘formative age’ in one of four possible periods (1) the post-war period, (2) the Soviet period, (3) the period of restoration of national independence, and (4) the period of transformation into a democratic society and highly technologized media culture.  

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Signe Opermann


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation) 2013, 11 (2): 504-514.

In cultural studies and cultural research, the importance of being critical is often stressed, but it is more rare to scrutinise how such critique is and can be performed. This text discusses differ- ent modes of critique, in three main steps. First, a brief review of the history and signifying layers of the concept of critique itself leads up to a late modern communicative concept of critique, linked to the contested relation between critique and tradition, and based on how Paul Ricoeur has interpreted ide- ology critique and the hermeneutics of suspicion. This communicative mode is contrasted to critical approaches that strive to radically dissociate themselves from others. Second, it is argued that the most powerful sources of critique are to be sought in the inner contradictions of the targeted spheres of social reality rather than applied from the outside. Such immanent – as opposed to transcendent – critique, has been formulated and exercised by Karl Marx, Theodor W. Adorno and Walter Benjamin, among others. The third section sums up the spiral moves of cultural studies as informed by critical hermeneutics: dialectical critique based on communicative and immanent critique must be on the move, never frozen, and may temporarily and locally explore radical and transcendent modes of cri- tique, in ways that have been discussed by Donna Haraway.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

This paper examines ‘ordinary’ people’s media communication about environmental issues. I choose the example of garden blogs. They fall under the category of topic-centered blogs; themes concerning garden/gardening are expected and communicated through narratives, comments, and images. These blogs belong to the sphere of domestic blogs that are insufficiently researched, even though they are more common than political blogs.Based on approx. 50 Swedish and German blogs and a qualitative, difference-theoretical analysis, I want to examine how these blogs, from the angle of gardeners everyday life ‘banalities’, communicate environmentalist issues. I want to examine which frames are used in order to increase the likelihood of connecting communication, which in turn creates virtual collectives.In result, environmental issues are mainly addressed from the topical angle of consumption and production themes by using frames of pleasure, enthusiasm and mutual agreement.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Kris och kritik: Kritisk teori, strategi och estetik 2013, 1 (1): 94-97.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: No Is Not an Answer. Berlin : Sternberg Press, 2013. 96-119.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Katarina Macleod

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Somatechnics 2013, 3 (2): 369-386.

Steampunk is an aesthetic technological movement incorporating science fiction, art, engineering, and a vibrant 21st century Do-It-Yourself counterculture. This article explores the feminist potentials of ‘thinking with’ steampunk as a playful, affective and decidedly political response to the present technological condition. It starts out by navigating the field of affect theory with a Deleuzian reading of Baruch Spinoza on affect, to then engage in the affective renderings of the relations, rhythms, and power of a soma-technology central to steampunks as well as their Victorian predecessors: the corset. The purpose of the article is (at least) threefold: first, it sets out to complicate the notion of the corset as either oppressive or liberating by a move from signification to affect. Secondly, it aims to put a feminist spin on Spinoza, by offering what Moira Gatens (2000) calls a micropolitical feminism of the in-betweens of subjects (or bodies). The argument, thus, takes seriously the seeming lack of distinction in Spinoza between nature and artifice, which opens up possibilities of exploring the affective relations and the in-betweens of human and nonhuman bodies. Finally, and as a result of this interest in the affective relationality of human and nonhuman bodies, the article contributes to the discussion of ‘somatechnics’ (Sullivan and Murray 2009) by proposing an intimate relationship between somatechnics and affect.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Sundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Somatechnics 2013, 3 (2): 225-232.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny SundénUlrika Dahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Гендер и СМИ [Gender and Media]. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism Lomonosov Moscow State University, 2013. 200-204.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Girlhood Studies 2013, 6 (2): 30-46.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Kritiker: nordisk tidskrift för litterär kritik och essäistik 2013, 27 : 74-95.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Annika Öhrner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Lars Hillersberg. Stockholm : Ordfront förlag, 2013. 105-123.

This essay discusses the work of Swedish artist Lars Hillersberg (1937-2004), and it's positioning within and meaning for the establishment of pop art in Sweden. Hillersberg's double position as provocateur and the protegee of the artistic establishment is developed upon, through the backrop of his early work and exhibitions in the early 1960's. mot bakgrund av av några av hans tidiga verk och utställningar vid början av 1960-talet. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Annika Öhrner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Languages of Exile. Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013. 243-260.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Dagens Nyheter 2013, 22 oktober : A6-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Roland Anrup

Johan FornäsPeter Josephson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Tal, makt, vansinne. Höör : Symposion Brutus Östlings bokförlag, 2013. 32-44.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Hägersten : Tankekraft förlag, 2013.

Diagnoser som ångestsyndrom, depression, ADHD, fetma och datorspelsberoende har snabbt ökat i omfattning och de är intimt sammankopplade med den tid vi lever i. Varför har det blivit så svårt att sluta? Sluta oroa sig. Sluta förtvivla. Sluta äta. Sluta stöka. Sluta spela. Varför kan vissa men inte andra låta bli? Och när beror det på att man är sjuk?Med utgångspunkt i egna erfarenheter och ett skärskådande av forskningsläget om olika diagnoser tar författaren pulsen på vår samtid. Människan har alltid varit en lidande varelse. Nu lider hon också på den medicinska vetenskapens vis, som en ”homo patologicus”. Men vad är egentligen en medicinsk diagnos? Varför har diagnoser blivit så viktiga för oss i vårt vardagsliv? Vilken betydelse får psykiatriska diagnosmanualer som DSM för vår syn på människan och hur hon skall hjälpas i hälso- och sjukvården?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Audience Transformations. London : Routledge, 2013. 30-46.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ranjana Das

Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Vägskäl. Göteborg : SOM-institutet, 2013. 517-528.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap 2013, 2-3 : 111-129.

This article focuses on the concept of ”strong women” in popularmusic and interrogates the idea of role models. Ideas of ”strongwomen” are analysed in the context of a contemporary Western society characterized by neo-liberalism and post-feminism. Advocacy of role models is regarded as an example of a political strategy that places the responsibility for social change on the individual. This is done from a feminist cultural theoretical perspective where discourse is seen as having an impact on material subjectpositions and where post-feminist culture is seen as part of contemporary discourse about Western women. These questionsare discussed through the analysis of two empirical materials consisting of interviews; one about teenage girls’ music use andgender in everyday life and the other about female musicians, mainly in their early twenties, participating in feminist musicassociations. In both studies the participants testify to a positive influence from female singers and musicians as role models, where these artists and musicians in different ways provide strength to the individual girl/woman. The authors regard this mediatised discourseas problematic but it is juxtaposed against the individual narratives where role models are regarded as very important. Questions concerning authenticity, politics and identification are vital themes in our analysis of their narratives. Popular music is, in some respects, described as an arena dominated by white men. Furthermore the research and public discussion about “strong women” and role models takes part in reproducing the hierarchies of popularmusic genres. These hierarchies are understood by the authors asrepresenting asymmetrical power relations of gender, ethnicity/raceand class.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marika Nordström

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Att skapa en framtid. Stockholm : Rosenlarv, 2013. 121-133.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sara Granath


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Ny Tid 2013, 35 : 10-12.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Tidningen Kulturen 2013, : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal of Medical Humanities 2013, 34 (3): 347-368.

The main aim of this paper is to reconstruct different aspects of the history of ideas of suicide, from antiquity to late modernity, and contemplate their dialectical tension. Reflexive suicide prevention, drawing on the ancient wisdom that the art of living is inseparable from the art of dying, takes advantage, it is argued, of the contradictory nature of suicide, and hence embraces, rather than trying to overcome, death, pain, grief, fear, hopelessness and milder depressions. This approach might facilitate the transformation of inner shame to inter-personal guilt, which is the precondition for coping with losses through grieving that is shared with others. The traditional projection of suicide on the ‘Other’, reinforced by modernity’s bio-political suppression of death, has inhibited development of good suicide prevention. Awareness of the ambiguity and ambivalence found in suicide may work as a resource when measures are taken to address as many causal mechanisms as possible, and bringing special emphasis to external factors.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

This paper focuses on the redefinition of European symbols and in particular the euro currency under the current condition of crisis, in which the identity of Europe is challenged and attributed new connotations. The current financial crisis has material effects for institutions and citizens, but also an important cultural aspect. Money is a means of payment but also a symbolic artefact or ‘micro medium’. Every European symbol demands a level of trust among its users, while also aiming to secure basic trust in the legitimacy of European values. When the euro runs into crisis, this therefore has crucial symbolic repercussions. If for instance Greece is forced to leave the Eurozone, this not only creates monetary difficulties but also questions the signifying force of the € symbol, whose name and design intend to express the foundation of European civilisation in the classical culture of Athens.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Youth Studies Australia 2013, 32 (2): 59-66.

The subject of this paper is research that explored how young people use text messages and songs stored on their mobiles and MP3 players to escape everyday life. Two separate research studies from Australia and Sweden were juxtaposed because of the similarities in findings as well as the similarity between these cultural objects. The various types of escape that were found were part of everyday routine and experienced in short bursts, such as the length of time it takes to re-read a text message or to listen to a song. However, there were also more extreme examples of these devices being used to temporarily retreat from everyday social interaction. The authors argue that these forms of escape seem to be necessary for young people to be able to maintain a “sense of being” (as defined by Heidegger in 1962) in their everyday life

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jayde Cahir

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research 2013, 5 : 7-13.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Martin Fredriksson

Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Javnost - The Public 2013, 20 (2): 11-25.

This paper aims to overview the current processes and challenges that relate to how media developments influence – and are influenced by – the ways in which personal and collective identities are formed in contemporary societies. First, it discusses ways to approach and define the concept of identity from a media perspective. A discussion of how identity formation issues links to the concept of new media literacies forms a transition to three sections that in turn analyse the social trends, the policy trends and the scientific trends that may be discerned in this area. The final section first summarises key research questions and then offers some more concrete ingredients for identifying possible instruments of a new research agenda.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Charis Xinaris

Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2013.

”Fenomenologin får inte vara en metafysik, utan en kritik av all metafysik, av alla stelnade system.””Om vi vill nå fram till sanningen kan vi inte bara söka efter den i lågländerna och vi får inte låta oss fascineras av den ytliga harmonins stillhet; vi måste låta det oroande, det oförsonliga och det gåtfulla växa i oss, det som det vanliga livet blundar för, det som det förbigår till förmån for dagens ordning.”Inledning till fenomenologisk filosofi samlar de föreläsningar som den tjeckiske filosofen Jan Patočka höll vid Karlsuniversitet i Prag mellan 1969 och 1970.Det som står i fokus är fenomenologin och dess utveckling från Edmund Husserls första arbeten fram till och med Martin Heideggers analyser i Vara och tid. I dessa föreläsningar introducerar Patočka fenomenologin genom att framhålla både fenomenologins aktualitet och dess många kontaktytor med filosofihistorien.Dessa föreläsningar kan betraktas som en inledning till fenomenologins grundbegrepp, likaväl som ett utmärkt sätt att bekanta sig med viktiga dimensioner i Patočkas egen filosofi.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jan Patočka


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

London & New York : Routledge, 2013.

This introduction to Marx’s economy critique covers all three volumes of Capital. It explores all the main aspects of Marx’s work – including his economic theory, his philosophical sophistication and his political critique – introducing the reader to Marx’s typical blend of sharp arguments, ruthless social reportage and utopian visions.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The Digital Turn. Frankfurt am Main, Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Wien : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013. 223-236.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

During the last years several new kinds of protest movements have appeared around the world. The occupy movement that started out as local occupation in New York and which was adopted in different places all over the world can be considered as the latest example of forms of subterranean politics (Kaldor et al. 2012). This paper considers critical media practices by Occupy groups in the European periphery namely Sweden, Latvia and Estonia. As the Occupy movement born in New York was initially largely invisible in mainstream media, the world learned about it through social media. What first was a pragmatic approach to spread the word became a critique of the impetus of mainstream media that are ignoring the 99% of society. Occupy is hence not only considered as an expression of a change in forms of social and political activism, but also in how communicative power is claimed and achieved.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Göteborg : Glänta Produktion, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrika Spindler

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Producing the internet. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2013. 165-184.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Göteborg : Nationella sekretariatet för genusforskning, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Lundberg

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: [Conference] Music, Gender & Difference. Wien : .

Previous research has shown that uses of media technologies (Gray 1992, Lally 2002) as well as music consumption (DeNora 2000) are gendered practices, while scholars have also emphasized how national context and ideas about nation, ethnicity and race play into the uses of media technologies (Miller & Slater 2000) and music cultures (Roy 2010).  Drawing on such analyses, this paper investigates contemporary practices in music use from an intersectional feminist perspective. It takes as its starting point the Internet as a core music platform, which is transforming listening modes and potentially also meanings of music.Posing questions about how to understand emerging trends in music use in relation to music as a gendered and place-bound practice, the paper presents one part of a larger study of music use online among young adults in Stockholm and Moscow. The study is ongoing and is conducted by the presenters and their colleagues. Analyzing focus group interviews with young adult men and women, the paper explores how – primarily – gender and nation is articulated (Hall 1996) in the talk about music and online media technologies. Through discussions about their favorite music as well as their favorite media to use when listening to music, and how music is intricately intertwined in their social networks, the participants display ideas about themselves in a context of gender, place, ethnicity and race. We argue that the way they listen to music and use media technology such as Spotify and Last FM can be understood as interplaying with the process of articulation of gender and nation, and that this articulation may differ between different places.  

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia JohanssonAnn Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender StudiesMedia and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

This paper presents an ongoing research project investigating how the Internet is impacting on music use in contemporary society. The backdrop to the project is the digitalization of society and culture, where the music industry has undergone profound changes, and where the Internet, for young people in particular, is changing listening modes and, potentially, meanings of, music in everyday life. Our objective is to shed light on what these transformations mean on the user level, and how their adaptation is situated specific geo-cultural settings, through a qualitative study of how young music users in Moscow and Stockholm experience and discuss music in relation to the Internet. Drawing on preliminary research findings, we aim to discuss and develop questions around how the Internet integrates with daily experience within contemporary society; what this means for music as a form of communication; and how adaptations of Internet technologies are shaped by geo-cultural frameworks.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia Johansson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Art History 2013, 36 (1): 226-231.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Axl Books, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Allan Kaprow

Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Audience Transformations. London : Routledge, 2013. 142-156.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Peter Lunt

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Europe-Asia Studies 2013, 65 (2): 321-346.

The aim is to present a conceptual and historical reconstruction of Gorbachev's notion of a ‘European home’, its underlying philosophy of history as well as its relation to Russian cosmism. The concept is contextualised within the convergence debate of the post-war period, in which a rapprochement between communism and capitalism was posited. The essay concludes with reflections on what the conceptualisation can tell us about the fall of communism and what impact the concept has had on today's search for a common European identity. An argument is advanced that the notion contained paradoxes that rather contributed to the dislocation of post-Soviet Russia from Europe.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical Studies

Moskva : Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

This thesis is a study of how the Swedish media company MTG Radio has developed new strategies and production practices in relation to technological change, new competition and media convergence during the first decade of the 2000s. During this period the media landscape in general has been marked by digitization, the rise of new media platforms and competition from new media companies. The study engages in an ethnographical perspective on media production, but also takes its starting point in political-economic theories on media work (Banks 2007, Hesmondhalgh & Baker 2011, Ryan 1992) in order to raise questions about the relation between technological and organizational changes and relations of power in production. Empirically, the thesis builds on interviews with production staff as well as an analysis of production documents and content produced by MTG Radio.The analysis shows that digital production technologies contribute to anincreased automation and centralization of control over editorial decisions, and hence to “de-skilling” (Braverman 1974/1999, Örnebring 2010). On the other hand, strategies of multiplatform production and the organizational changes taking place contribute to an “upskilling” (Edgell 2012) and give DJs and presenters more autonomy and control within production. This strengthened autonomy involves their possibilities for reflexivity and critical self-evaluation, as well as their control over content and production. Finally, the thesis connects these results to the more overarching question of alienation, arguing that upskilling and increased autonomy do not automatically create better jobs within the media house, or necessarily represent emancipatory possibilities within media work, as has been argued in previous research and theory.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marko Ala-Fossi

Fredrik Stiernstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Health, Illness and Disease. Durham : Acumen Publishing, 2013. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: What is Theory. Malmö : Liber, 2013. 299-302.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mats Rosengren


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Rhetoric

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Biblis 2012, 57 : 53-65.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Annika Öhrner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The International Journal of Cultural Policy 2012, 18 (5): 563-578.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Egle Rindzeviciute


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: . : .

This paper analyses how mobile phone owners turn from being regarded by the industry as users of an interpersonal medium, to a mass audience along some of the principles for how this “audience commodity” has been constructed in previous mass media settings, centering on the radio, television and the press. One purpose is to critically examine the relation between interpersonal and mass media, such as how technological developments connected to digitization has altered the market for media commodities and contributed to the development of new business models. The second purpose is to discuss the consequences of this shift, and its consequences for our ontological understanding of what it means to use a mobile phone.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

This paper discusses two trends in the debates about contemporary television journalism. Firstly, journalism is said to be increasingly subsumed an economic logic, privileging entertainment before serious journalistic practices. Most often this is framed as if entertainment is eating its way into serious journalism, affecting it negatively and thus being detrimental for the political public sphere and political reasoning. Secondly, it is often pointed to a changed relation between journalism and politicians, where the latter have lost some of their power, for example political debates. This paper relates these two trends and argue, against a field model inspired by Bourdieu, that it is not entertainment that is eating its way into journalism, but the other way around: Rather than having been absorbed by entertainment, journalism has differentiated, become more autonomous as a sub-field of cultural production, and has gradually come to dominate both factual and entertainment television.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Arts Marketing: An International Journal 2012, 2 (2): 104-117.

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to better understand the world-view of cultural consumers who download and share copyrighted content for free.Design/methodology/approach – By utilizing a critical discourse analysis of the arguments given by file-sharers in online forums and in interviews, focusing on the arguments which arise for justifying certain everyday uses, and contrasting these with their material and structural conditions, a critical approach is sought, inquiring on the validity of certain tropes. Particularity was achieved by making a geographically delimited case study.Findings – The case study helps to conceptualize online sociality, with wider application than this geographical setting only. As BitTorrent technology makes every downloader share his/her files while downloading, file-sharing is found to accommodate individual opportunism, and a world-view that puts the consumer at the centre of agency, in turn reinforcing the civic idea of cultural access and diversity as a human right.Research limitations/implications – Previous findings have correlated heavy file-sharing with heavy consumption of culture. However, given the greater ability of previewing material and of acquiring more obscure content, how have the habits and consumption patterns changed among media consumers who routinely file-share? More detailed studies are needed, on how individual users come to question their own role, and the impact of their own actions – and what the level of awareness actually is (in different geographical/demographic settings) of the conditions for cultural production, distribution and consumption. A range of potential new research areas and scenarios is listed.Practical implications – Given the common constituents seen in the world-views of file-sharers, this civic approach to intellectual property could prompt professional producers, distributors, rights holders and regulators to consider the actual visibility of potential impacts of file-sharing. The civic approach suggests that file-sharers can reconcile with individual authors or artists, as long as these are found to have precarious economic conditions, and not be affiliated with an industrial mode of reasoning. Cultural producers that are seen to adhere to a civic (amateur- or fan-like) mode of reasoning – rather than an industrial (professional) one – are met with more sympathy among consumers.Originality/value – The paper is of interest for media sociology, cultural studies, and policymaking within the cultural industries.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Ambiguity of the Sacred. Huddinge : Södertörn University, 2012. 73-77.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Agora Journal for metafysisk spekulasjon 2012, 02-03 : 74-91.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Finnish Review of East European Studies 2012, 4 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jaakko Turunen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

International Journal of Communication 2012, 6 (1): 585-605.

This article conceptually outlines P2P-based file-sharing as a totality, a mass utility, and a backdrop to everyday cultural life. It elaborates on a recent study of Swedish file-sharers to sketch some important constituents of what would constitute a "piracy culture." It shows that the actual file-sharer argumentation is not fully synonymous with established notions of "piracy" but rather reveals the complexity of the phenomenon and how the discourse invoking it relies on modes of justification that are not entirely commensurable. Moreover, the file-sharer rhetoric is contingent on a range of entities and infrastructures that condition actual usage. Noting the institutionalized, semi-anonymous, and depersonalized elements to file-sharing, I propose a different interpretation than regarding it as a "gift economy" like the tight-knit communities Mauss described in 1923. Instead, I propose a metaphor borrowed from Titmuss' example of blood donors that acknowledges the perceived "need" for culture and the associated "right" to access content that file-sharers are exercising.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jonas Andersson Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: EU Kids Online. London : The London School of Economics and Political Science, 2012. 63-64.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Olle Findahl

Cecilia Von Feilitzen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Critical and Cultural Theory

Religionsvetenskaplig internettidskrift 2012, 14 : 1-5.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Cederberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

IJHE Bildungsgeschichte 2012, 2 (2): 247-249.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marta Edling

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal of technology in human services 2012, 30 (3-4): 250-261.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andra Siibak

Michael Forsman

Patrik Hernwall


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and EducationSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Media TechnologyMedia and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Cultural Technologies. New York : Routledge, 2012. 103-118.

The information society, as an ideological formation, has previously been identified as celebrating speed and ephemerality: overcoming of boundaries, destabilization of identities and the dissapearance of distance (Mosco 2004). This paper however analyzes an ideological shift within digital culture. The paper identifies this shift as accompanying new business models, associated with what is often referred to as cloud computing. The success of this computing paradigm, we claim, is dependent on the construction of a new ideology, in which information is not only identified with speed and ephemerality but also stability and durability. Empirically the paper concerns data centers: large, dedicated buildings in which interconnected servers are used to store and process digital information, utilized for commercial or administrative purposes by governments, organizations, and companies like Google, Facebook and Microsoft. Data-centres are what Lisa Parks have called “obscure objects of media studies” (Parks 2009:101). They are hidden, out of sight, inconspicuous and often placed far from population centres. But at the same time they are “material imaginaries” comparable to the houses of large media corporations (cf. Ericson & Riegert 2010). They are conciously inscribed in a number of symbolic and ephemeral geographies. They are discursively – and not only materially – constructed as stabile, durable, lasting and safe. The purpose of the paper is to analyse how, by whom and with what purposes.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik StiernstedtPeter Jakobsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: And They Lived Happily Ever After. Budapest : Central European University Press, 2012. 85-104.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christine Farhan

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Norrköping : ACSIS, 2012. ( ; )

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johanna Dahlin

Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: ECREA 2012 Conference Proceedings. : ECREA: European Communication Research and Education Association.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

One of the few well-known Russian women politicians Irina Khakamada wrote in her book “Sex in big politics”: “[As awoman] you are welcome to be sniper, tamer, war reporter. You are, however, not welcome to politics, because politics ispower”. The way women politicians are perceived in political circles, as well as in public in general, to a high degreedepends on politicians’ media representations. It makes intersection of gender, media, and politics, and its dimensionalcomplex of powers, an especially important arena to study. With few women in the political sphere and highly feminizedjournalistic profession, Russia constitutes an interesting case, especially taking into account the Soviet interpretation ofgender equality achievement and the Post-Soviet backlash. Journalists and editors of the Russian quality press will beinterviewed in an attempt to answer the question why, when and by what means women politicians are gender framed in themedia discourse.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Acting-Up. : .

In a time when neo-conservative tendencies in gender representations are acquiring more and more popularity in the media worldwide – and the domain of humour is certainly no exception (e.g. the US show The Talk) – are there parallel trends to be detected in countries where feminism never has received widespread recognition, as in the case of Russia? What can we learn about gender stereotypes from contemporary Russian infotainment TV shows? This paper will explore these questions by studying two popular shows, Projectorparishilton (“The Paris Hilton’ Projector”) and Devchata (“The Girls”). These weekly ironic-analytical programmes are broadcast prime time on the national channels Channel One and Rossiya-1 and somewhat resembling the format of programmes like Loose Women and The View. With its four male anchors, Projectorparishilton aimed to attract a younger and more progressive audience of both genders and from the beginning ignored any specific gender orientation. By contrast, Devchata – with its female anchors – was explicitly launched with a female audience as their target group, producing a type of humour recognized by essentialists as “female”.Applying a critical perspective, we study verbal and non-verbal constituents of the programmes (including music, gestures, etc.), the interior of the studio, the appearance, behaviour (and jokes!) of the anchors, in order to study how gender, age, culture and nationality are encoded/signified. Based on Laura Mulvey’s term “male gaze”, we introduce the notion of “male humour”, which is implicit not only in the way the anchors appear as subjects and objects of jokes; but also in the position taken by the viewer, regardless of gender. At heart, we question the gendered nature of humour in general and the creation of “women’s space” in the media, which in fact is a reinforcement of traditional gender (and other) stereotypes.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Zhurnalistika v 2011 godu. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Mass Media after Post-Socialism. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism, MSU.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Гендер и СМИ [Gender and Media]. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism Lomonosov Moscow State University, 2012. 172-196.

This article is an attempt to theorize around such three extensive concepts as fashion, politics, and gender. Broadly covered in academic research, the theme of fashion and representation of female politicians, however, requires further analysis and new definitions. Coming from the media studies and having in mind the two common approaches to interconnections between media and politics, namely mediatized politics and politicized media, we transfer these approaches into the sphere of fashion and introduce the notions of politicized fashion and fashionized politics. By doing that, we, on the one hand, are suggesting to view fashion as a part of the political communication sphere[1], as one of the many existing mediums, involved into production and reproduction of the political ideas. On the other hand, fashion can be understood on a more significant level as production and marketing of new styles, which makes it a broad field, of which political and any other communication is just a part.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . Norrköping : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research 2012, 4 (2): 249-255.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Martin Fredriksson

Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Art History and Visual Studies in Europe. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2012. 421-438.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Hans Dam Christensen

Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Konsthistorisk Tidskrift 2012, 81 (3): 188-193.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The Art Bulletin 2012, 94 (2): 187-198.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Lychnos 2012, : 251-256.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Filosofi och medicin. Stockholm : Thales, 2012. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

International Journal of Communication 2012, 6 : 2758-2779.

The blogosphere supports an interpersonal meaning production process by providing the space and opportunities for communication through the circulation and discussion oftopics. Using systems theory, as developed by Niklas Luhmann, I explore how garden bloggers issue invitations to communicate by studying their selection process from all possible entries and images. I examine the selection criteria for posting an entry and especially look at Swedish and German garden blogs to study “ordinary” people’s relations in the blogosphere from the perspective of sharing opinions, impressions, and emotions about their garden environment. As a result, the selection criteria of novelty, values, identification, conflicts, visuality, and sociality are revealed. A communicative culture of approval, admiration, and respect, which promotes emotional ties and strengthens the feeling of common concerns in the blogosphere, is noticeably present.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journalism Studies 2012, 13 (3): 325-339.

The front pages of Scandinavian “quality newspapers” often include aesthetically pleasing and enigmatic photographs that dominate the whole page. These pictures seem to deviate from the traditional function of press pictures as facts in news stories. At the same time, they can be understood as part of a modernist tradition in journalism where objectivity is the norm. By adopting a historical perspective, this article highlights the subjective and artistic dimension in photography as it developed in parallel with the ideal of objectivity in the 1930s. This approach makes it possible to understand today's front-page photographs as well suited in meeting the effects of digitalization such as “multivocality” and a general mistrust in photography's indexical status.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Patrik Åker

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Göteborg : Nationella sekretariatet för genusforskning, 2012.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Lundberg

Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

VIEW. Journal of European Television History and Culture 2012, 1 (2): 45-55.

On April 14th, 1961, television viewers across Europe watched live images of Yuri Gagarin being celebrated on the Red Square in Moscow. The broadcast was made possible by the linking of the Intervision and Eurovision television networks, which was the result of cooperation between broadcasters on both sides of the Iron Curtain. By looking into how the co-operation between the OIRT and EBU was gradually developed between 1957 and 1961 this article engages with the interplay between cultural, legal and technological aspects of broadcasting and how the transnational broadcast of Gagarin’s return to Moscow was made possible. The article furthermore argues the need to understand early television in Europe as a dialectic between the national and the transnational and shows how the live transmission network binding the East and West together was the result of an interplay between structures provided by transnational organisations such as the OIRT and EBU, and initiatives by national broadcasting organisations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Lundgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Aesthetic Pathways 2012, 2 (1): 31-48.

To Hannah Arendt, the work of art is characterized as a "thought-thing." The expression, which is an elaboration of Kant, refers to the idea that art is both material and possible to de-sensualize and de-materialize. Art fills the function of sustaining cultures and providing a value of permanency. To Arendt, this function can in turn be guaranteed by the function of judgment, sensus communis, which she interprets in terms of a sense of "realness."

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Placing art in the public realm. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2012. 125-136.

To Hannah Arendt, the public sphere has ontological implications; appearances are produced under conditions of plurality. For that reason, her philosophical work has implications for our reflections on the function of art in public space. What appears and why? What is refrained from appearing? How does intimate space interact with public space? The article looks at these questions and discusses the close relation between political agebcy and art.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Aesthetics

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Vem i hela världen kan man lita på?. Lund : Studentlitteratur, 2012. 25-45.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

London : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

In the late 19th century in northern Spain and southern France prehistoric mural paintings and engravings were discovered. Cave Art, Perception and Knowledge inquires into epistemic questions related to images, depicting and perception that this rich and much debated material has given rise to. Focusing respectively on the historical and scientific circumstances and controversies and on the epistemic and perceptual problems and questions the discovery of these paintings and engravings gave rise to, the book traces the outline of the doxa of cave art studies. It criticizes the different ways of trying to make sense of the cave art. Furthermore it suggests, with the help of both Cornelius Castoriadis's concept of technique and Ernst Cassirer's notion of symbolic form, a yet untried way out of the hermeneutical impasse where the interpretation of the paleolithic pictures finds itself today.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mats Rosengren


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Rhetoric

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Third Text 2012, 26 (6): 691-703.

This article takes at its point of the departure the practice of transracial adoption of children and adults. During the colonial period, it was not only non-white native children or adults who were adopted by white colonisers and settlers; the opposite also occurred. The existence of these ‘inverted’ transracial adoptions is well-documented in literary and autobiographical texts and historical documents, as well as in art and visual culture. At that time, the white transracial adoptee who had been transformed into the Other was stigmatised and even demonised as something of an ethno-racial monster transgressing the boundaries between Europeans and non-Europeans. This article aims to re-conceptualise transracial adoption within the framework of the fundamental inability of Europeans to attach to the lands and peoples outside Europe by making use of the concepts of indigenisation and autochtonisation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

James Arvanitakis

Tobias Hübinette


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Korea Observer 2012, 43 (3): 503-525.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Tobias Hübinette


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap 2012, 3 : 124-127.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulrika Dahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Time and Space in Words and Music. Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012. 73-85.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Senmoderna reflexioner. Linköping : Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012. 91-99.

Steampunk – eller vad man på svenska ibland kallar för ångpunk – kan sägas vara en estetisk teknologisk rörelse som inbegriper science fiction, konst, ingenjörskonst och en livfull subkultur. Den kännetecknas av retrofuturistiska drömmar om vad som kunde ha hänt om 1800-talets ångdrivna, mekaniska teknologier hade fått ett annat spelrum. Dess retrofuturism är en anakronism i form av medvetna kronologiska misstag, en inkonsekvent tidslighet som felplacerar personer, händelser, objekt (i det här fallet främst teknologier). Det kan sägas handla om ett fantasins omskapande av det förgångna med hjälp av nutidens teknologiska sensibilitet och kunskap. Den här texten följer några centrala teman inom ångpunken i skärningspunkten mellan teknologi, politik och estetik och organiseras i tre delar. Den första delen fokuserar på det första ledet i begreppet ångpunk, alltså ånga, och söker skissera på vilka sätt rörelsen inspireras och drivs av kraften hos maskiner från en svunnen tid. Den andra delen syftar till att ringa in vad som kan sägas vara ångpunkens punketos i termer av samhällskritik, tekniksyn och motståndsstrategier. Den tredje delen kretsar slutligen kring vad som skulle kunna benämnas ångpunkens kroppsanakronismer. Diskussionen koncentreras främst till de betydelseförskjutningar som uppstår då korsetter och urverksmekanik möter en viktoriansk genuslogik för 2000-talet.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Sundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

New York : Routledge, 2012.

How do gender and sexuality come to matter in online game cultures? Why is it important to explore "straight" versus "queer" contexts of play? And what does it mean to play together with others over time, as co-players and researchers?Gender and Sexuality in Online Game Cultures is a book about female players and their passionate encounters with the online game World of Warcraft and its player cultures. It takes seriously women’s passions in games, and as such draws attention to questions of pleasure in and desire for technology.The authors use a unique approach of what they term a "twin ethnography" that develops two parallel stories. Sveningsson studies "straight" game culture, and makes explicit that which is of the norm by exploring the experiences of female gamers in a male-dominated gaming context. Sundén investigates "queer" game culture through the queer potentials of mainstream World of Warcraft culture, as well as through the case of a guild explicitly defined as LGBT.Academic research on game culture is flourishing, yet feminist accounts of gender and sexuality in games are still in the making. Drawing on feminist notions of performance, performativity and positionality, as well as the recent turn to affect and phenomenology within cultural theory, the authors develop queer, feminist studies of online player cultures in ways that are situated and embodied.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Malin Sveningsson

Jenny Sundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Games and Culture 2012, 7 (2): 164-184.

 This article discusses knowledge production in game studies by exploring notions of emotion, closeness and (queer) desire in new media ethnography. It uses field notes and experiences from an ethnographic study of the online game World of Warcraft. As opposed to the kind of fieldwork where being, living, and staying in the field is the only option, new media ethnography brings with it the possibility of moving through different locations and bodies to the point where the borders between them may start to blur. The text positions itself within this very uncertainty to investigate its consequences for ways of knowing online game cultures.Drawing on the body of ethnographic work interrogating erotic subjectivity and desire in the field, the discussion makes use of personal experiences – in particular an in-game as well as out-of-the game love affair - as potentially important sources of knowledge. Was it her, regardless of the game? Was it her through the game? Or was it the game ‘‘itself ’’? The article provides the story of a particular way of being introduced to and of falling for a game, a woman, and the ways in which these two were intensely connected. Set against the backdrop of ‘‘the affective turn’’ in cultural and feminist theory, and in making visible how desire may circulate through game spaces, the article argues for an articulation of desire as intimately related to technology; of desiring technology and of technological, or perhaps technologized desires.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Sundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation) 2012, 10 (1): 49-55.

In much scholarly writing and in many leftist and activist accounts the enclosures of the cultural commons have been fiercely critiqued. However, during the last years, new media business models, that challenge the notion of the cultural industries as “copyright industries”, has been taking shape. A new class of entrepreneurs is instead working to expand the commons as part of their businesses. Accordingly, representatives from these new media industries, policy makers, and politicians have joined the academic and political critique of the “enclosures of the cultural common”. The paper argues that this is a shift within the dominant media policy paradigm and an attempt to integrate existing practices on the Internet, based on cooperation and sharing, into the market. By relocating the struggle from “intellectual property” to “platform economics”, the media industry can exploit the productivity of the commons while holding on to the power that comes with ownership and property.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik StiernstedtPeter Jakobsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation) 2012, 10 (2): 752-764.

This article was written in order to contribute to a discussion about a critical definition of alternative media. Askingwhat role alternative media could play in challenging neoliberal discourse in an age where capitalism have become immune to criticism, it elaborates on the concept of “the alternative” and the media through three sections. The first section discusses neoliberalism and the connection between neoliberal doctrine and mainstream media. This connection is described as promoting “public amnesia”, financialization and economization of news journalism. The second section discusses alternative media from the perspective of new social movements and symbolic resistance, claiming that the symbolic resistance framework undermines the critical potential of alternative media, it also comments on some recent critical literature on neoliberalism and capitalism. The third section takes examples from artistic explorations of capitalism and television to propose how a distinction between social and formalist aspects of “the alternative” could inform a critical notion of alternative media.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Linus Andersson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Whiteness and postcolonialism in the Nordic region. Farnham : Ashgate, 2012. 43-56.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Tobias Hübinette


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Thales, 2012.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Sara Danius

Sven-Olov Wallenstein

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
AestheticsPhilosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Cultural Technologies. New York : Routledge, 2012. 1-15.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Global Media Journal 2012, 6 (1): -.

This article discusses examples of mediated and mediating symbols used to build trust in Europe as a shared transnational project. It starts with a general discussion of globalisation and transnational mediation, and then briefly exemplifies how money, flags, anthems and other symbols work to suggest identifications. The five key European symbols ratified by the Council of Europe and the European Union are introduced, presented and analysed, indicating how the EU and other pan-European actors have chosen to express a sense of shared identity and meaning. Each of these key symbols is then scrutinised as multi-layered mediating tools in creating loyalty and reinforcing faith in collective societal institutions of markets and states, and in the corresponding imagined supra-national community. These dominant European symbols are shown to reflect a balance between homogenisation and fragmentation. The analysis locates a core identifying formula of “an ambivalent desire for communication with others”. However, it also finds a major set of tensions around this thematic core, understanding European identification as a dynamic process of mediation rather than as a limited and limiting object.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 2012, 37 (2): 139-158.

In this paper, changes in identity and selfhood experienced through organ transplantation are analyzed from a phenomenological point of view. The chief examples are heart and face transplants. Similarities and differences between the examples are fleshed out by way of identifying three layers of selfhood in which the procedures have effects: embodied selfhood, self-reflection, and social-narrative identity. Organ transplantation is tied to processes of alienation in the three layers of selfhood, first and foremost a bodily alienation experienced through illness or injury and in going through and recovering from the operation. However, in cases in which the organ in question is taken to harbor the identity of another person, because of its symbolic qualities (the heart) or its expressive qualities (the face), the alienation process may also involve the otherness of another person making itself, at least imaginatively, known.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Studies in Practical Knowledge

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

New York : Routledge, 2012.

The essays in this volume discuss both the culture of technology that we live in today, and culture as technology. Within the chapters of the book cultures of technology and cultural technologies are discussed, focusing on a variety of examples, from varied national contexts.Cultural Technologies brings together internationally recognized scholars from the social sciences and humanities, covering diverse themes such as intellectual property, server farms and search engines, surveillance, peer-to-peer file-sharing, the construction of techno-history, technology and epistemology and much more. It contains both historical and contemporary analyses of technological phenomena as well as epistemological discussions on the uses of technology.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Moving data. New York : Columbia University Press, 2012. 91-103.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: I framtidens skugga. Göteborg : SOM-institutet, 2012. 459-467.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Information, Communication and Society 2012, 15 (6): 796-814.

The ‘active audience’ has theoretically been conceptualized from two perspectives: in political economy, it is suggested that television audiences work for the networks while watching and that they contribute to the valorization process with their labour. Although contested, it has survived among media scholars, also feeding into the discussion on web surveillance techniques. The other conceptualization comes from reception theory, media ethnography and cultural studies, where the interpretive work by audiences is seen as productive and resulting in identities, taste cultures and social difference. This article relates these perspectives by considering audiences as involved in two production–consumptions circuits: (1) the viewer activities produce social difference (identities and cultural meaning) in a social and cultural economy, which is then (2) made the object of productive consumption as part of the activities of the media industries, the end product being economic profit.This article argues for the relevance of analysing these as separate circuits, with different kinds of labour at their centre, and that recent debates on the active audience often misrecognize the difference.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Global Media Journal 2012, 6 (1): -8.

Human feeling or emotion is a growing area of interest for cultural theory, particularly as a site of cultural negotiations of symbolic and affective kinds (Ahmed, 2004; Berlant, 1997; Massumi, 2002). Rather than perceiving emotions as a ‘thing’ outside or determined by culture, seeing emotions as an important part of the cultural process opens up opportunities for studying their role in cultural practices. Drawing on Ahmed’s theories of ‘happiness’, this article explores the emotions expressed and discussed by a group of 14 to 16 year old girls in Sweden when listening to, talking about, and producing, sad love songs. The article examines how these emotions take part in shaping the girl’s gendered orientation toward some things and not others. Sad love songs by American and Swedish artists were popular with most of the girls taking part in a study of girls’ music culture and they perceived these songs as ‘good’ and connected to a particular emotional range. Most often the emotions expressed in the songs were those of sadness and pain caused by lost, failed or never achieved love. These emotions were a source of joy among the girls. In particular, sharing and listening to specific songs was described as joyful. The emotional experiences that they associated with sad love songs oriented the girls toward ideas and subjects such as love and boys. A future and grown-up heterosexual femininity was imagined. Furthermore, the girls’ emotional experiences and talk created gendered ideals about who they wanted to become in order to be happy.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Jahrbuch / Deutsche Akademie für Sprache und Dichtung 2012, 2011 : 82-86.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Subaltern 2012, 1 : 29-36.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baden-Baden : Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 2012.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: On Whiteness. Freeland : Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2012. 221-233.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

James Arvanitakis

Tobias Hübinette


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory