Our research

Books in the librarySödertörn University has professional, creative research environments that range over many disciplines and fields.

Our research has a contemporary focus united with an active and critical approach to the past. Many of the research groups and research projects strive to achieve a high level of contemporary and social relevance. The university's research generally has an international focus, even in subjects that traditionally examine their own national cultures and history. A key word is multidisciplinarity.

Publications

Publications from the DiVA publications database are listed here on an ongoing basis.
Publications

Journal of Affective Disorders 2018, 226 : 332-338.

Background: Several studies have linked childhood hunger to an increased risk for later depression. However, as yet, there has been little research on this relation in adults of all ages or whether there are sex differences in this association. The current study examined these issues using data from a national population-based sample.Methods: Data were analyzed from 5095 adults aged 25–84 collected during the Estonian Health Interview Survey 2006. Information was obtained on the frequency of going to bed hungry in childhood and on depressive symptoms using the Emotional State Questionnaire (EST-Q). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between hunger and depression while controlling for other demographic, socioeconomic and health-related variables.Results: In a fully adjusted model, going to bed hungry in childhood either sometimes or often was associated with significantly increased odds for adult depressive symptoms. When the analysis was stratified by sex the association was more evident in men where any frequency of childhood hunger was linked to adult depression while only women who had experienced hunger often had higher odds for depressive symptoms in the final model.Limitations: Data on childhood hunger were retrospectively reported and may have been affected by recall bias. We also lacked information on potentially relevant variables such as other childhood adversities that might have been important for the observed associations.Conclusion: Childhood hunger is associated with an increased risk for depressive symptoms among adults. Preventing hunger in childhood may be important for mental health across the life course.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andrew Stickley

Mall Leinsalu

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Fisheries, Quota, Management and Quota Transfer. Switzerland : Springer, 2018. 141-158.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Madeleine Bonow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Danmark og Finland i 100 år (1917–2017). Greifswald : Universität Greifswald, 2017. 159-184.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Norbert Götz


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Catalan Journal of Communication & Cultural Studies 2017, 9 (2): 217-235.

This article focuses on the gender politics of the news broadcast on the Russian state-controlled TV channels – Channel One (Pervyj kanal), Russia-1 (Rossiya-1), Russia-24 (Rossiya-24), NTV and RT (formerly Russia Today) – from January to September 2015, a period when the TV news closely followed the conflict in Ukraine and the growing tensions between Russia and Europe. The study shows that the news on the state-controlled TV channels interpret the state politics in only one possible way – ascribing the most traditional and essentialist characteristics to the country, prioritizing male actors and military activities and suggesting no alternatives to ‘(re)masculinization’ of the image of Russia in the situation of the conflict on the territory of another state, despite the alleged disengagement of the country in it. The article concludes that the state-controlled TV channels use essentialist gendering as a part of nation-branding and nation-building strategies, with an aim to construct the gendered and intersectionalized ideology of the ‘Russian world’ that would target both internal and external audiences and go beyond the borders of the Russian Federation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Internationalen 2017, 3/9 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Håkan Blomqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Against the Current 2017, November/December (191): 30-32.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Håkan Blomqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Aftonbladet Kultur 2017, 7/11 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Håkan Blomqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Post-Medieval Archaeology 2017, : 1-23.

SUMMARY: The 84-gun ship Riksäpplet was one of the first ships in Sweden built under supervision of the newly recruited English master. In 1676, the ship came adrift, struck a rock and sank. In 2015 a minor field survey of the wreck was undertaken. An inventory of finds recovered from the wreck in various museum collections and in private hands has been compiled and the preserved correspondence from the construction of the ship has been re-examined. This material has provided new insights regarding the peculiarities and special architecture of Riksäpplet.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Niklas Eriksson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

MARIS

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archaeology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Cultural Geography 2017, : 1-21.

Little empirical research has considered the way in which macro-regions are perceived outside academic and political circles. Such studies alone can determine what regional narratives mean for the wider public, and the extent to which they coincide with region-building images produced by elites. This article examines the mental maps of high school seniors in 10 cities in the Baltic Sea and Mediterranean regions, focusing upon their perception and knowledge of other countries in those areas. Despite efforts at region building since the Cold War, the two regions remain divided on mental maps. Students have little knowledge of countries across the sea from their own, although such knowledge is generally greater among those from coastal (and particularly island) locations. A comparison with maps constructed by Gould in 1966 reveals that the perception of countries within one's own region among Italian and Swedish students has become more negative over the last 50 years.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Janne Holmén


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Anti-gender campaigns in Europe. London and New York : Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017. 175-194.

This paper examines the mobilization against “gender” which has spread across Poland since 2012, pointing to both local specificities and links to the transnational context. It is shown that while Polish anti-genderism is part of a boarder transnational trend (a fact long invisible to most of Poland’s liberal defenders of gender), some aspects of this phenomenon are indeed locally embedded. The campaign has consisted of many initiatives undertaken by the Catholic Church and conservative groups to fight gender equality education and legislation, sexual and reproductive rights, as well as the very use of the term “gender” in policy documents and public discourse. Polish anti-gender campaigners claim that their aim is to protect the Polish family (especially children) against feminists and the “homosexual lobby”; to defend authentic Polish cultural values (which are equated with Catholic values) against the foreign influence of the corrupt West and liberal European Union. Targets include sexual education, ratification of the Istanbul Convention and gender equality policies more broadly. The authors argue that the current wave of anti-gender mobilization in Poland is not business as usual or another wave of conservative backlash, but a new ideological and political configuration, which successfully combines the local and the transnational, making possible a politically effective mass movement. We argue that the success of anti-gender mobilization can be explained by its leaders’ skillful references to ordinary people’s dignity and their identity as an oppressed majority. Anti-genderism consistently presents itself as an effort to defend authentic indigenous values against foreign forces and corrupt elites – a discourse which we interpret as a variant of right-wing appropriation of the anti-colonial frame. What may be construed as an Eastern European peculiarity is that in the region gender tends to be discredited as totalitarian ideology as exemplified by the following statement made in 2013 by Polish Bishop Tadeusz Pieronek: “Gender ideology is worse than communism and Nazism put together”. While the contested policies are coming from the West and are presented as Western impositions, genderism itself is seen as a vast project of social engineering rooted in Marxism and comparable to Stalinism. This tension or ambivalence persists in many of the documents and statements examined here: genderism is demonized as a cultural imposition a foreign body that is Western and Eastern at the same time.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Agnieszka Graff

Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Global Dialogue 2017, 7 (1): -.

Gender matters in global politics. After the US elections, we know this better than ever: the mass appeal of Trump’s blatant misogyny is just a part of the problem. Populism in the US and elsewhere feeds not only on economic instability and fear, but also on anxieties around gender relations, (homo)sexuality and reproduction. In country after country, critiques of what conservatives (especially Catholics) term “gender” or “genderism” – gender equality policies, sex education, LGBTQ and reproductive rights – have helped to mobilize men as well as women, paving the way for populist leaders. This article argues that while opposition to feminism and gender equality policies is not new, the current upsurge marks a departure from the previous neoconservative paradigm: social conservatism is now explicitly linked to hostility towards global capital.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Agnieszka Graff

Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Europe-Asia Studies 2017, 69 (8): 1322-1323.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Alina Zubkovych

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2017, X (3): 53-62.

The article provides a closer reading of Walter Benjamin’s essays Experience and Poverty and Moscow, by juxtaposing the records of his visit to Russia in 1926–1927 with the author’s reflections on the nature of the transformations in the urban space of an early Soviet city. By using the dystopian image of Mickey Mouse as the desired inhabitant of modernity introduced by Benjamin in Experience and Poverty, Seits gives the allegorical and comparative interpretation to the substantial changes in the living space of Moscow that were witnessed by Walter Benjamin.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Seits

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Aesthetics


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Rebellious parents. Bloomington and Indianapolis : Indiana University Press, 2017. -.

This chapter examines fathers’ activism in contemporary Poland, focusing on the ways in which activists frame the problem, their claims and expected outcomes, and on the specificity of the fathers’ activism in a post-socialist context in comparison to other cultural and political environments. The authors apply analytical tools of social movement theory, specifically the notion of framing, which is defined as a process of interpretation and meaning production in a given political, cultural and social context. Three main frames that the Polish activists have employed are distinguished: 1) “misogynist” frame which highlights fathers’ rights as men rights, 2) “state violence” frame which focus on fathers rights as citizens, and 3) “equality” frame which stresses fathers’ engagement as part of a gender equality agenda. Each of these types of self-representation and arguments combines to a different degree transnational and local discourses on fathering, masculinity, and the family, which reflects the hybrid nature of contemporary discourses and ideals of fathering. The empirical illustration of the analysis is derived from a case-study of fathers' activism in Poland between 2012 and 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Renata Hryciuk

Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Civil society revisited. New York : Berghahn Books, 2017. 314-324.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kerstin Jacobsson

Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Civil society revisited. New York : Berghahn Books, 2017. 1-35.

The text argues that a re-assessment of the post-socialist civil societies in general and Polish civil society in particular is called for on both empirical and theoretical grounds. For the purpose of such re-thinking, the authors address critically the way in which civil society has been conceptualized in the post-socialist context, with special focus on Poland; and, secondly, discuss the limitations of the common indicators used to assess the strength and character of the civil societies in the region. It is argued that there are forms of collective action that have tended to escape observers’ lenses for theoretical, methodological as well as normative and ideological reasons. Consequently, the authors calls attention to the exclusionary practices entailed in the “making up” of civil societies in the region, revealing how the concept of civil society as commonly applied in political discourses as well as empirical research in fact excludes many forms of social activism.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kerstin Jacobsson

Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Rebellious parents. Bloomington and Indianapolis : Indiana University Press, 2017. -.

This chapter introduces the readers to the theme of a broad range of parental movements that have emerged in contemporary Central-Eastern Europe and Russia over the past two decades. Examples of such movements include social mobilizations of conservative parental groups against legal and discursive changes that would affect gender equality in Ukraine and Russia, Czech parents opposing mandatory vaccination of children, and fathers’ groups in Poland and the Czech Republic focusing on custody rights. Parental activism is increasingly visible and influential, but it has been the subject of relatively little research to date. The aim is to rectify this by analyzing representative cases of parental movements in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia, with the hope to enrich and explain the current interpretations of social activism and civil society in the postcommunist region, which is often associated with a low level of social engagement and weak civil society, and to offer new conceptualization of mothers’ and fathers’ activism that may be applicable in other geographical contexts. The introduction to the collection of essays aims to fill a gap in the scholarship on civil society and social movements that is both empirical and theoretical, presenting an entirely new set of observations on the developments in contemporary parental activism in Central-Eastern Europe and Russia and proposing new conceptualizations of civic activism and civil society.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katalin Fábián

Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Bloomington and Indianapolis : Indiana University Press, 2017.

Parental movements are strengthening around the world and often spark tense personal and political debate. With an emphasis on Russia and Central and Eastern Europe, this collection analyzes formal organizations as well as informal networks and online platforms which mobilize parents to advocate for change on a grassroots level. In doing so, the work collected here explores the interactions between the politics, everyday life, and social activism of mothers and fathers. From fathers’ rights movements to natural childbirth to vaccination debates, these essays provide new insight into the identities and strategies applied by these movements as they confront local ideals of gender and family with global ideologies. “This is an excellent collection with conceptual and methodological unity and high quality contributions that are thoroughly researched.... The work makes a real contribution to the field (both theoretically and empirically), challenges stereotypes, and presents new areas of valuable research.” — Nanette Funk, coeditor of Gender Politics and Post-Communism: Reflections from Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union “We see here evidence of engaged citizens, not directly challenging political leaders about broad economic or political policies, but seeking to change public atti¬tudes to vital issues facing people in their everyday lives as parents. ...This is very much a contribution to scholarship and knowledge. We just don’t know about this type of activism.” —David Ost, author of The Defeat of Solidarity: Anger and Politics in Postcommunist Europe

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katalin Fábián

Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Cultural Identities, National Borders. Göteborg : Centrum för Europaforskning, 2017. 7-20.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Saarbrücken : Lambert Academic Publishing, 2017.

The Nordic countries top every survey on overall well-being and expressed happiness and satisfaction with living conditions and the environment, and, moreover, emerge on top even in measures of global competitiveness. This book unravels the unique economic and social processes by which these countries have achieved such universally acclaimed success. The authors note that the Nordic success has not been a sudden surge forward, and provide substance to the argument that conditions going back to feudal times, and unique societal relations and a social consensus allowing low power distances and smooth decentralization have played key roles in the Nordic transition into full-fledged knowledge economies. Indeed, as they note, “if there is a Valhalla for Nordic politicians, policy-makers and organization leaders, it will surely provide them an idyllic island under a mellow sun for holding amiable discussions, lowering their guards in a give-and-take spirit, on issues pertaining to the well-being of that Nordic paradise.”

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

P. Nandakumar Warrier

Cheick Wagué

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Migration and Communication Flows: Rethinking borders, conflict and identity through the digital. : .

In eighty countries of the world (excluding Russia), there are produced around 3,5 thousand media in Russian language for 30 million Russian speakers (Astafyev 2012). Russophone diaspora is specific, as it has a multilayered (different waves of migration) and multiethnic character (see Pivovar 2008, 2010). The printed media of the three first waves of the Russian emigration are thoroughly studied (e.g., Bogomolov 1994, 2004; Esin 2003; Mikhalev 2009; Suomela 2014; Zhirkov 2003). There are as well several studies on the online space of the “Russian abroad” (e.g., Morgunova 2014; Reut and Teterevleva 2014). Yet, the currently existing printed Russian-language media remain somewhat of a blind spot on the map of the diaspora studies and media studies alike, despite the scale of this media segment.This study focuses on the printed media segment of the Russophone media abroad. The study is based on a twelve-year long monitoring of Russian-language press that consisted of a basic content analysis of 65 printed media and survey of 64 journalists working for 50 outlets. The materials were collected during the trainings for these journalists organized by the Universal Association of Russian Press (VARP) and Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University.The study maps the space of the Russian-language press abroad, describes the tendencies characteristic for it, and highlights the typological models within this segment. On the one hand, the Russian-language media abroad are influenced by global processes, which lead to their commercialization, standardization, concentration and integration with non-established media online. On the other hand, these media are oriented at specific audiences, united by the language and culture. The current challenges of these media are related to the political events (such as Ukrainian conflict), as well as the broader problem of self-identification of the Russophone diaspora.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Olga Voronova

Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

Since 2013, scholars have been discussing events happening in Ukraine from the perspective of the “war of narratives” (Khaldarova and Pantti 2016). In this war, information has become one of the main weapons (Hoskins and O’Loughlin 2010), and fight for the publics has crossed the borders of the ordinary economic and political struggles. Previous research has mainly focused on the attempts of the Russian mainstream state-controlled media to influence the Russian-speaking audiences in Ukraine, Russia and elsewhere by spreading pro-Kremlin propaganda (see Pantti 2016). Less attention has been given to the Ukrainian media community and the internal processes in it in the period of crisis (Bolin, Jordan & Ståhlberg 2016). Being a part of the research project ”From nation branding to information war”, this paper focuses on a very particular group of the representatives of the Ukrainian media community – Russian journalists who moved to Ukraine and work for Ukrainian audiences. This paper applies the theoretical prism of “imagined audiences” (e.g. Litt and Hargitai 2016, boyd 2008) and “imagined communities” (Anderson 2006). The analysis is based on semi-structured interviews with seven journalists conducted in 2017. What are the motivations behind their choice of the new geographic location and place of work? What are the challenges that they face adjusting to the new journalism culture and how do they see their role in the “war of narratives”? How do they imagine and perceive their audiences? And how do they relate to the language issue, as Ukrainian language is becoming more and more dominant both in broadcast and printed media?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Nordmedia conference 2017. : .

Journalism culture is described by scholars as “one of the resources journalists draw upon to coordinate their activities as reporters, photographers, and editors” (Zelizer 2005, p. 204). Importantly, journalism cultures should be analyzed not only in connection to the contexts, but also in and as processes (Voronova 2014, p. 221). While most journalism cultures in the world face similar challenges, such as commercialization and digitalization, some of them are challenged by more radical challenges, such as war conflicts. Ukrainian journalism culture since 2013 is undergoing a painful process of continuously adjusting to and counteracting the circumstances of conflict, with external and internal propaganda (e.g. coming from the so-called “people’s republics” of Donetsk and Luhansk), economic pressure being a consequence of the more general crisis, and guidelines coming from the state institutions, such as the Ministry of Information Policy (MIP) (e.g. Bolin, Jordan & Ståhlberg 2016, Pantti 2016, Nygren & Hök 2016). Nygren et al. (2016), based on content analysis and interviews with journalists, conclude that one of the main challenges for the Ukrainian journalists today is a conflict between the ideal of neutrality in coverage and favoring of “patriotic journalism” in practice. This paper takes this discussion further and suggests to look at how the professional journalism organizations in Ukraine reflect upon this conflict, which journalists themselves define as a split between journalists and “Glory-to-Ukraine-journalists” (Sklyarevskaya 2016, October 20th). How does the participation of Ukrainian journalism organizations in the discussion of objectivity vs. patriotism look like on different levels – international, regional, national and local? Is there a possibility to retain a national culture of journalism in the situation of crisis, or does it inevitably end up in splitting to many journalism cultures that have their own rules, beliefs and ideals? Using Hanitzsch’s model of deconstruction of journalism culture (Hanitzsch 2007, Nygren et al 2016), and focusing specifically on the dimension of epistemological beliefs, this paper analyzes a specific case: project ”Two countries – one profession” initiated and supported by the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media. The project consists of regular round tables where senior representatives from Ukrainian and Russian professional journalism organizations meet to discuss ways to improve professional standards and safety of journalists, as well as collaborative projects between young journalists from the two countries. The project is perceived as contradictory and provocative by a part of the Ukrainian media community (e.g. Rudenko 2016, December 15th). The paper is based on analysis of observations of meetings between the National Union of Journalists of Ukraine and the Russian Union of Journalists, interviews with representatives of these and other media organizations and experts in Ukraine, focus groups with the young journalists involved in the project, and negative and positive reactions to this project by the Ukrainian media community.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: IAMCR 2017. : .

Since 2013, scholars have been discussing events happening in Ukraine from the perspective of the “war of narratives” (Khaldarova and Pantti 2016). In this war, information has become one of the main weapons (Hoskins and O’Loughlin 2010), and fight for the publics has crossed the borders of the ordinary economic and political struggles. Previous research has mainly focused on the attempts of the Russian mainstream state-controlled media and other actors (e.g. trolls on social media) to influence the Russian-speaking audiences in Ukraine, Russia and elsewhere by spreading pro-Kremlin propaganda (see Pantti 2016). Less attention has been given to the Ukrainian media community and the internal processes in it in the period of crisis (Bolin, Jordan & Ståhlberg 2016). Being a part of the research project ”From nation branding to information war”, this paper focuses on the visions of the publics by the Ukrainian media community today. How do representatives of the media community imagine and perceive their audiences? What are the changes that have occurred along with the territorial changes – loss of Crimea to Russia and establishment of selfproclaimed ”people’s republics” in the East of the country? And which language do media producers choose today to speak to their audiences? Through the prism of “imagined audiences” (e.g. Litt and Hargitai 2016, boyd 2008) and “imagined communities” (Anderson 2006), this paper discusses several aspects of the changes in the visions of the audiences by the Ukrainian media community. First, it focuses on the visions of the audiences by the journalists who due to the crisis had to move geographically and, thus, work for a different audience today. As such, it takes up the cases of journalists who moved from Crimea and the socalled LPR and DPR to Kyiv or other Ukrainian regions. Another case is journalists from Russia who moved to Ukraine for ideological reasons. Second, the paper discusses the reactions of the media community to the need for reaching out to the audiences in Crimea and so-called DPR/LPR, the technological and ideological challenges of this communication. Third, it focuses on a serious challenge and change concerning the language, in which the audiences are addressed. Due to new legislative proposals and, according to some media experts, economic reasons, Ukrainian language is becoming more and more dominant both in broadcast and printed media. Yet, simultaneously Ukraine is one of successful producers of transnational entertainment products in Russian language (e.g. popular travel show “Oryol i Reshka” by TeenSpirit Production which is broadcast in Ukraine, Russia and Kazakhstan).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: IAMCR 2017. : .

There are more than 30 million Russian speakers living outside of the current borders of the Russian Federation. “Russian abroad” can partly be viewed as diaspora (e.g. Cohen 1997, Hoyle 2013, Safran 1991, Sheffer 2003, Vertovec 1999) and partly as a cultural macro-social group. Its specificity is its multilayered (different waves of migration) and multiethnic character (see Pivovar 2008, 2010). “Russian abroad” consists of two groups: Russian migrants who left the country in different periods and their descendants, and Russian-speakers who found themselves abroad after the collapse of the USSR. In eighty countries of the world, there are published around 3.5 thousand media in Russian language. The printed media of the three first waves of the Russian emigration are thoroughly studied (e.g., Bogomolov 1994, 2004; Esin 2003; Mikhalev 2009; Suomela 2014; Zhirkov 2003). There are as well several studies on the online space of the “Russian abroad” (e.g., Morgunova 2014; Reut and Teterevleva 2014). Yet, the currently existing printed Russian-language media, their role, political orientation, functions, professional views of the journalists, diapason of influence, audiences - remain somewhat of a blind spot on the map of the diaspora studies and media studies alike, despite the scale of this media segment. Empirical studies of these media are challenged by the fact that not all of these media have their online versions and absence of a common catalogue (see O. Voronova 2016). The existing studies are either country-based or focus on the linguistic aspects exclusively. This study focuses on the printed media segment and suggests a typology of the Russian-language press abroad. The study is based on a twelve-year long monitoring of Russian-language press that consisted of a basic content analysis of 65 printed media and survey of 64 journalists working for 50 outlets. The materials were collected during the trainings for these journalists organized by the Universal Association of Russian Press (VARP) and Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University. The study maps the space of the Russian-language press abroad, describes the tendencies characteristic for it, and highlights the typological models within this segment. On the one hand, the Russian-language media abroad are influenced by global processes, which lead to their commercialization, standardization, concentration and integration with non-established media online. On the other hand, these media are oriented at specific audiences, united by the Russian language, culture, traditions; for the post-Soviet countries – by the common experience of living in the same state. These media have features of both global and national media, as their audiences are influenced by at least two cultures. Being spread in the world, these media have the same language, similar functions and, often, a common agenda. The current challenges of these media are related to the political events (such as Ukrainian conflict), as well as the broader problem of self-identification of the Russian-language diaspora. The study suggests viewing the Russian-language media abroad as a cultural phenomenon that should be analyzed in dynamics and in the context of the geopolitical changes and challenges.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Olga Voronova

Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

School of Social Sciences

Journalism

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

This study focuses on mediated representations of Europe during Euromaidan and the subsequent Ukraine–Russia crisis, analysing empirical material from Ukraine, Poland and Russia. The material includes articles from nine newspapers, diverse in terms of political and journalistic orientation, as well as interviews with journalists, foreign policymakers and experts, drawing also on relevant policy documents as well as online and historical sources.The material is examined from the following vantage points: Michel Foucault’s discursive theory of power, postcolonial theory, Jürgen Habermas’s theory of the public sphere, Pierre Bourdieu’s field theory, Jacques Derrida’s hauntology and Ernesto Laclau’s concept of the empty signifier. The methods of analysis include conceptual history (Reinhart Koselleck), critical linguistics and qualitative discourse analysis (a discourse-historical approach inspired by the Vienna school) and quantitative content analysis (in Klaus Krippendorff’s interpretation).The national narratives of Europe in Ukraine, Russia and Poland are characterised by a dependence on the West. Historically, these narratives vacillated between idealising admiration, materialist pragmatics and geopolitical demonising. They have been present in each country to some extent, intertwined with their own identification.These discourses of Europe were rekindled and developed on during Euromaidan (2013–2014). Nine major Ukrainian, Russian and Polish newspapers with diverse orientations struggled to define Europe as a continent, as the EU or as a set of values. Political orientation defined attitude; liberal publications in all three countries focused on the positives whereas conservative and business newspapers were more critical of Europe. There were, however, divergent national patterns. Coverage in Ukraine was positive mostly, in Russia more negative and the Polish perception significantly polarised.During and after Euromaidan, Ukrainian journalists used their powerful Europe-as-values concept to actively intervene in the political field and promote it in official foreign policy. This was enabled by abandoning journalistic neutrality. By comparison, Russian and Polish journalists were more dependent on the foreign policy narratives dispensed by political elites and more constrained in their social practice.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Fornäs

Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Anthropogenic environmental changes can serve as drivers for evolutionary responses in wild populations. To predict the long-term impact of anthropogenic changes on populations, it is crucial to understand the genetic effects caused by these disturbances. The Baltic Sea is considered to be one of the world’s most contaminated seas, and the increase of anthropogenic chemical pollution is a major threat to its ecosystems. This thesis assesses the impact of harbors and sewage treatment plants on physiological traits and genetic structure of resident populations of blue mussels at replicated sites in the Baltic Sea. The initial evaluation of the overall genetic pattern in blue mussel populations in the Swedish West Coast, the Baltic Proper and the Bothnian Sea found genetic differentiation between the three water basins and a low genetic differentiation within each basin, especially within the Baltic Proper. Despite the low genetic differentiation among blue mussels within the Baltic Proper, a parallel genetic differentiation associated with sewage treatment plant effluents was found in this basin. This included genomic regions with a high degree of differentiation between reference sites and sites affected by sewage plants effluent. This genetic differentiation is suggested to be due to post-dispersal selection acting in each generation. In contrast, no parallel genetic differentiation was associated with harbors. We identified five genomic regions in blue mussels, showing strong signs of selection, shared among three out of four replicated reference sites and sites affected by sewage effluents in the Baltic Proper i.e. Askö, Tvärminne and Karlskrona. An initial characterization of these genomic regions revealed functions related to immune and endocrine responses, oxidative stress and shell formation. Our results indicate that selection caused by sewage effluents involves multiple loci. The same genomic regions are found across different locations in the Baltic Proper but there are also unique genomic regions at each location. No genotoxic or histopathological effects were found among blue mussels from sewage effluent-affected areas but a higher frequency of histological abnormalities in the digestive gland were observed in mussels from harbors.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mats Grahn

Josefine Larsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

This thesis studies the uses of the concept of revolution in Swedish socialist press from 1917 to 1924. Political revolution and civil wars shook several countries. The Russian February and October Revolutions were soon followed by uprisings in countries such as Germany and Finland.While the social and political history of this period, with its mass demonstrations for bread and voting rights, often called the Swedish revolution, has been covered extensively in existing research, we know much less about the theoretical understanding of revolution among Swedish socialists. This thesis examines the concept of revolution from a perspective inspired by the Begriffsgeschichte of German historian Reinhart Koselleck. This foundation in the history of concepts aims at understanding how Swedish socialists, in a wide sense, understood their own time, how they related to the past and what they expected from the future, during the years of the First World War and the immediately following years. By focusing on what might be the most central, but also the most contested and most difficult to define, concept I hope to complement earlier research focusing on the social and political history of the period and its socialist movements.The main purpose of the thesis is to analyse how the labour movement understood revolution with particular weight placed upon the theoretical and ideological tensions between revolution and reform, determinism and voluntarism and localized and universal revolution. The starting point is the political and social changes in Sweden and abroad at that time and the place of the political press as opinion leaders capable of negotiating the space of political action. A secondary aim is to discuss how focusing on temporality can inspire new perspectives on the use of conceptual history.My research shows that how the concept of revolution was used was shaped both by already established notions regarding the socialist revolution as well as by the political situation at hand. The October Revolution forced a sharpening of its meaning, wherein different factions elaborated their understanding of it in relation to each other, which in turn determined how the concept was used fom that point on. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Lars Ekdahl

Karin Jonsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Ships and Maritime LandscapesQUICK FIND Use keywords to find the product you are looking for.Advanced SearchShips And Maritime Landscapes. Eelde : Barkhuis.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan RönnbyNiklas Eriksson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

MARIS

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archaeology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Ships and Maritime Landscapes. Eelde : Barkhuis.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan RönnbyNiklas Eriksson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

MARIS

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archaeology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Under the Sea. Cham : Springer, 2017. 53-63.

This chapter examines the benefits and constraints of collaboration between an archaeological research unit and a commercial company, using as examples joint research conducted by MARIS (Maritime Archaeological Research Institute at Södertörn University) and the Swedish commercial marine survey company MMT. The examples presented here included the detailed reconstruction by remote sensing of deeply submerged shipwrecks and the mapping and discovery of submerged archaeological landscapes and associated artefacts such as fish traps, which can then be examined more closely by archaeological divers. The benefits to archaeologists of collaborating with well-equipped commercial companies are obvious, but the benefits are mutual. The demands of archaeological research can generate new technological solutions that have commercial application, as well as producing results with wider educational and social benefits. Provided that archaeological investigations are embedded in the normal commercial operations of the company, such collaboration can be cost-effective for both parties, and is further enhanced by collaboration with film companies, which generates wider public interest and publicity for all concerned.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Joakim Holmlund

Björn Nilsson

Johan Rönnby

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

MARIS

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archaeology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Strasbourg : Council of Europe Publishing, 2017.

Skriften Vägvisare redogör, med pedagogisk-teoretisk förankring och en rad ämnesdidaktiska exempel, hur studiet av religioner och icke-religiösa livsåskådningar kan utgöra ett väsentligt bidrag till interkulturell utbildning i Europas skolor. I en rekommendation 2008 från Europarådets ministerkommitté om religioners och icke-religiösa livsåskådningars dimension av interkulturell utbildning beskrevs utbildningsformens art och mål. Vägvisare erbjuder ett stöd till beslutsfattare,skolor (lärare, skolledare, huvudmän) och lärarutbildare i hanteringen av frågeställningar som rekommendationen kan ge upphov till i olika länder och skolsammanhang. Med omfattande feedback från utbildningsmyndigheter, lärare och lärarutbildare i Europarådets medlemsländer ger Vägvisare konkreta råd, till exempel hur begrepp som används i utbildningsformen kan förklaras, hur kompetenser för undervisning och lärande kan utvecklas och vilka didaktiska metoder som går att tillämpa, hur en “fredad zon” för elevdialog kan skapas i klassrummet, hur elever kan stöttas i analysen av medierepresentationer av religioner, hur icke-religiösa livsåskådningar kan diskuteras jämsides med det religiösa perspektivet, hur människorättsfrågor kan behandlas i relation till religions- och trosuppfattningsfrågor, hur kontakter kan skapas mellan skolor och skolsystem med organisationer, samfund, föreningar och myndigheter i det omgivande samhället. Vägvisare är ingen läroplan eller policyförklaring. Syftet är att erbjuda beslutsfattare, skolor och lärarutbildare i Europarådets medlemsländer, liksom andra intressenter inom verksamhetsfältet, verktyg att arbeta med frågor som uppstår i tolkningen av Europarådets rekommendation om religioners och andra livsåskådningars dimension i interkulturell utbildning, för att möta enskilda länders behov. Vägvisare är frukten av en internationell expertgrupps arbete inom Europarådet i samarbete med Europeiska Wergelandcentret.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Robert Jackson

Paul Moerman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

The governance of the environmental and health problems that follow in the wake of globalised trade is one of the great contemporary challenges. One of these challenges is the management of chemical pollution and associated risks, and one sector facing this challenge is the textile industry, which has complex supply chains spread across continents. At the same time the role of actors on the playing field are changing and market actors are being called on to responsibly manage the issue of chemical risks and associated challenges. However, governance and control are often obstructed due to complexity and considerable knowledge uncertainty. This situation complicates responsibility-taking and makes it difficult to ascribe liabilities to specific actors, as it is not obvious who is responsible for what. This thesis is concerned with the process of how a group of market actors – private and public textile buyers – assume responsibility of chemical risks in their supply chains in a situation that is characterized by uncertainty and complexity. This thesis aims to contribute to an understanding of what happens when market actors are called on to manage the negative side effects of globalisation. The focus is on Swedish textile-buying private and public organisations. The thesis constructs an analytical model based on the key concepts responsible governance, responsibilisation, and responsible supply chain management (RSCM). The thesis explores the barriers, challenges and opportunities that exist for buyers seeking to assume RSCM and whether a process of responsibilisation can be observed in the textile sector. The thesis uses an exploratory approach and interviews, participatory observations and literature studies, as well as case studies to understand the process and to investigate barriers, challenges, opportunities. In summary, the thesis shows that a process of responsibilisation is ongoing on the organisational and sector levels. Further, it is shown that due to the complex structures of the chains, there are more barriers and challenges than opportunities for buyers striving for RSCM. However, it is argued that cooperation, stronger public and private policy, and a reflexive approach could be ways forward towards RSCM and increased responsibilisation in the textile sector.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Magnus Boström

Natasja Börjeson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: The Baltic Sea Region: A Comprehensive Guide. Berlin : Berliner Wissenschafts-Verlag GmbH, 2017. 115-168.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Joakim Ekman

Mai-Brith Schartau


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Over the past few decades there have emerged greater possibilities for users and consumers of media to create or engage in the creation of digital media technologies. This PhD dissertation explores the ways in which the broadening of possibilities for making technologies, specifically software, has been taken advantage of by new producers of digital culture – freelancers, aspiring digital media creators and small studios – in the production of digital visual media. It is based on two empirical case studies that concern the making of free software for computer graphics animation production in two contexts: by a loose collective of anime fans in Siberia, Russia, and by a small animation studio in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The case studies are presented and analysed in the scope of four journal articles and one book chapter which form the core of the dissertation.The dissertation draws on a media practice perspective and an understanding of software as an artefact that concentrates and mediates specific infrastructural arrangements that entangle politics of technological production, economic interests and practice-related concerns. The analytical focus of the research problematises in particular practices of software decommodification and its further repair and development by non-programmers; the anchoring of software development and repair in actual production practices of computer graphics animations; and a commitment to sharing software, animations and other artefacts online as commons. The thesis combines several concepts from anthropology and science and technology studies to theorise these practices: – politics and regimes of value (Appadurai, 1986); repair and artful integrations (Jackson, 2014; Suchman, 2000); gifting (Baudrillard, 1981; Mauss, 1925/2002) and autonomy (cf Bourdieu, 1993). Bringing together these concepts, the dissertation regards them as constitutive and indicative of what I refer to as ‘media-related infrastructuring practices’, or practices in which non-programmers generate infrastructures through creating and mediating arrangements around technical artefacts like software.The results of the dissertation indicate how making free software for computer graphics media is entangled in diverse conditions of technological unevenness that may enable, but also limit, the possibilities of aspiring media creators to improve their status or work positions in the broader field of digital media.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Åker

Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2017, 10 (3): 96-96.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Business Strategy and the Environment 2017, : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Magnus Boström

Natasja Börjeson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Postcolonial Studies 2017, 20 (3): 294-316.

Some states create geographical imaginaries that envision the homeland as coherent and good, and the spaces of Others as disordered, dangerous and therefore legitimate objects of violence. Such ‘violent cartographies’ serve not only to justify policy actions, but constitute bordering practices aiming to provide stability, integrity and continuity to the Self, sometimes referred to as ‘ontological security’. This article examines the role of creativity and artistic imagination in challenging dominant geopolitical narratives. It examines satire on the Russian-language internet, which played upon the Russian state’s geopolitical narrative about the war in Ukraine 2014–15. Three themes within this dominant narrative – (1) the imperialist idea of Russia as a modernising force, (2) the gendering of Ukraine as feminine and Europe as homosexual and (3) the idea that the current war was a re-enactment of Russia’s historical battle against fascism – all became the object of fun-making in satire. I argue that satire, by appropriating, repeating but slightly displacing official rhetoric in ways that make it appear ridiculous, may destabilise dominant narratives of ontological security and challenge their strive towards closure. Satire may expose the silences of dominant narratives and undermine the essentialism and binarism upon which they rely, opening up for estrangement and disidentification.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

New Media and Society 2017, : 1-17.

This article discusses how alternative software infrastructures can emerge out offrictions, failure, and repair in the attempts of media creators to evade piracy. Usinga case from the geographical fringes of Russia called Morevna Project, and theoriesof infrastructures and repair, the article suggests how repair can lead to the slow,mundane and fragile formation of what I refer to as ‘situated’ digital infrastructures forcultural production. While pirate-based media production can push creators to searchfor and develop alternative infrastructures, the latter emerge as fragile frameworksthat are constantly threatened from collapse and suspension. The continuous work ofintegrating diverse interests across local and online media-related contexts and practicesbecomes an essential stabilising force needed to perpetuate these infrastructures andprevents them from falling back into oblivion.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal on Ethnopolitics and Minority Issues in Europe 2017, 16 (2): 41-66.

Immigration into states with historical linguistic minorities creates the dilemma of which language newly arrived immigrants should learn in the state-provided integration programmes. Research has shown how territorially concentrated historical minorities have used immigrants to favour their own nation-building projects. While these minorities to some extent operate like a majority within their federal state or province, this paper explores how constitutionally bilingual Finland, having a Swedish-speaking non-territorial minority with the same linguistic rights as the majority, governs immigrant integration. It investigates the implications of the strong legal and weak societal status of Swedish for immigrant integration by connecting scholarship on liberal multiculturalism and integration in multilingual states to laws, reports and interviews on integration in Swedish-speaking Finland. It shows tensions between Finland-Swedish integration aspirations and state level policies promoting a majority-monolingual integration. Unlike minorities with federal protection, the non-territorial Swedish-speaking minority largely relies on the voluntary choice of immigrants to choose Swedish as their language of integration. Structural obstacles, however, hinder this choice in bilingual regions, having resulted in political debates and actions. This article bridges research on Finnish multiculturalism and research on integration policy in contexts where historical minorities are present by introducing a non-territorial, formerly dominant minority to the research field.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nina Carlsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2017.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Alina Žvinklienė

Eva BlombergYulia GradskovaYlva Waldemarson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Radical left movements in Europe. Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2017. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Grzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2017.

When the Iron Curtain lifted in 1989, it was seen by some as proof of the final demise of the ideas and aspirations of the radical left. Not many years passed, however, before the critique of capitalism and social inequalities were once again the main protest themes of social movements. This book provides an account of radical left movements in today’s Europe and how they are trying to accomplish social and political change.The book’s international group of leading experts provide detailed analysis on social movement organizations, activist groups, and networks that are rooted in the left-wing ideologies of anarchism, Marxism, socialism, and communism in both newly democratized post-communist and longstanding liberal-democratic polities. Through a range of case studies, the authors explore how radical left movements are influenced by their situated political and social contexts, and how contemporary radical left activism differs from both new and old social movements on one hand, and the activities of radical left parliamentary parties on the other. Ultimately, this volume investigates what it means to be ‘radical left’ in current day liberal-democratic and capi- talist societies after the fall of European state socialism.This is valuable reading for students and researchers interested in European politics, contemporary social movements and political sociology.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Christian Fröhlich

Grzegorz PiotrowskiMagnus Wennerhag

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Civil society revisited. New York : Berghahn Books, 2017. 129-152.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

New York : Berghahn Books, 2017.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elzbieta KorolczukKerstin Jacobsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Regulating education is a vital part of government. This thesis is inspired by recent changes on the political landscape of higher education. It is guided by an interest in how political objectives and concepts of ideal social relationships are transformed and expressed through government university policies and their consequences. An early stage of what is now commonly referred to as the modern state and the modern research university, rather than present or relatively recent developments, will be explored. Instead of studying trends on the European continent, the thesis inquiries into an attempt made by the Swedish government to revise the constitutions of Swedish schools and universities through the so-called Educational Commission appointed in 1745.The purpose of the thesis is to apply a modern policy perspective to the Educational Commission’s attempt at reforming the constitution of the Swedish universities. The aim is to illuminate the construction of university regulations and to place this within a larger framework of policy making during the Age of Liberty (Frihetstiden) in Sweden.The Commission was an attempt by the Swedish government to implement educational changes based on a holistic view of the realm. It was one of several contemporary initiatives with nationwide ambitions. The Commission did not, however, succeed in reaching its formal objectives, but by placing too much emphasis on what the Commission did not achieve one risks overlooking other results and consequences. It initiated new communication structures, operating procedures and accountability schemes. It changed the regulations for assessing higher education making the university transparent and accountable to the government in new ways. New administrative routines for producing university reform were introduced.The Commission also provided university actors with a legitimate channel for voicing their opinions in relation to the government. They were given a legitimate position to formulate problems, questions and solutions regarding the university. The demands of the professors for increased autonomy in seeking knowledge and providing education stood against the claims made by the government for added control and insight into academic affairs. Through the Commission, the views of the professors were put into circulation in an official political context.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Erland Sellberg

Fredrik Bertilsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Paulina RytkönenMikael LönnborgMarcus Box

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

ENTER forum

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

European psychiatry 2017, 47 : 42-48.

AbstractBackground Prior research has indicated that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms may be associated with an increased likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behaviour (RSB). However, research on this association among adolescents has been comparatively limited and mainly confined to North America. The aim of this study was to examine if inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms were linked to RSB in a community cohort sample of Russian adolescents. Methods The study was based on a group of 537 adolescents from Northern Russia. Information on inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity as well as conduct problems was obtained through teacher ratings, while information on RSB (previous unprotected sex, number of sexual partners, sex while intoxicated and partner pregnancies), substance use, perception of risk, and parenting behaviour was based on students’ self-reports. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between the variables. Results Teacher-rated inattention symptoms predicted RSB, independently of co-morbid conduct problems, substance use, risk perception, and different parenting styles (parental warmth, involvement and control). In addition, male sex, binge drinking and a lower assessment of perceived risk were all significantly associated with RSB in an adjusted model. Neither teacher-rated hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms nor conduct problems were linked to RSB in the full model. Conclusions Deficits in planning and organizing behaviours, being easily distracted and forgetful seem to be of importance for RSB in Russian adolescents. This highlights the importance of discriminating between different types of ADHD symptoms in adolescence to prevent risk behaviours and their potentially detrimental outcomes on health and well-being.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

J. Isaksson

Andrew Stickley


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Marine Science and Engineering 2017, 5 (2): -20.

The combined effects of ocean warming and contaminants on marine ecosystems are poorly understood. In this study, we exposed model ecosystems comprising typical shallow coastal Baltic Sea communities to elevated temperature (+5 °C) and the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), both singly and in combination, for 13 days. Higher temperatures caused the release of PO4 from the sediment, which in turn stimulated the growth of the cyanobacteria Dolichospermum sp. This in turn led to an increase in the copepod Acartia bifilosa and other indirect effects in the plankton, interpreted as being caused by changes in predation, grazing, and competition. Elevated temperatures also stimulated benthic primary production and increased production of benthic mollusk larvae. Although increased temperature was the dominant driver of effects in these systems, HBCDD also appeared to have some effects, mainly in the zooplankton (both direct and indirect effects) and benthic meiofauna (an interactive effect with temperature). Although the study used model ecosystems, which are an approximation of field conditions, it highlights that interactive ecosystem effects between two stressors are possible and demonstrates the ecological and temporal complexity of such responses. Such unpredictable responses to warming and contaminants are a major challenge for ecosystem management to deal with multistressor situations in the Baltic Sea. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

A. -L Golz

Clare Bradshaw

Kerstin Gustafsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Slavic and East European Journal 2017, 61 (2): 278-298.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Central European Journal of International and Security Studies 2017, 11 (2): 9-27.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Adisa Avdic

Mats Braun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. 173-199.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stig Blomskog

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Economics


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. 155-171.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Kari LehtiläPatrik Dinnétz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2017.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

This thesis focuses on issues around reflexivity and highly skilled migration. Reflexivity has been an underused concept in migration studies and incurporating it has been long overdue. By reflexivity this thesis understands the capacity of an actor to evaluate his or her position in relation to social structures, to take action in managing those structures and, finally, to critically revise both the position and action taken.There are multiple reasons as to why incorporating reflexivity is a useful endeavor to migration studies. On one hand, using reflexive types in order to understand different migration motivations offers an alternative to otherwise mainly class based explanations behind migration objectives. Migration research has long relied on the idea that migration motivations can be coupled with societal and class background. Similarly, return migration has been described almost unanimously as a result of a homing desire. Both positions, as claimed in this thesis, are oversimplifications. On the other hand, I argue that, reflexivity helps to analyze the importance of class or even society on migration in 21th century. This is why I suggest to analyze all three in concurrence – migration, reflexivity and class.In the following pages I analyze how reflexivity can be operationalized for studying migration. So far, reflexivity has been either used as background concept – mobility studies or for explaining particular kind of migration – lifestyle migration. I argue, that with careful operationalization reflexivity could be useful tool for explaining wide-variety of migrations – family, labour, lifestyle etc. Three articles in this thesis focus on providing such operationalizations, analyzing the relationship between migration motivations and reflexivity. Finally, the first article in this thesis analyzes the background of my particular group of migrants – Estonian highly skilled migrants and positions them in relation to other groups in Estonian society. Moreover, the article also underlines that self-development and lifestyle, if you will, is an important motivation for Eastern European migrants as well.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Adrienne Sörbom

Maarja Saar

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Psychological Trauma 2017, 9 (Suppl 1): 93-97.

OBJECTIVE: To assess, at a clinical level, the mental health of former Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia by comparing them with same-age controls.METHOD: The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was administered during 2011-2012 to 99 cleanup workers and 100 population-based controls previously screened for mental health symptoms.RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis showed that cleanup workers had higher odds of current depressive disorder (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI: 1.34, 7.01]), alcohol dependence (OR = 3.47, 95% CI [1.29, 9.34]), and suicide ideation (OR = 3.44, 95% CI [1.28, 9.21]) than did controls. Except for suicide ideation, associations with Chernobyl exposure became statistically nonsignificant when adjusted for education and ethnicity.CONCLUSION: A quarter of a century after the Chernobyl accident, Estonian cleanup workers were still at increased risk of mental disorders, which was partly attributable to sociodemographic factors. (PsycINFO Database Record

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kaia Laidra

Mall Leinsalu

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

The present investigation analyses the political thought of the Czech philosopher Jan Patočka. It focuses on the question of how we are to understand political life: what are its distinguishing features and how we are to circumscribe it conceptually. According to Patočka the experience of politics is one characterized by a loss of meaning, a loss of a foundation or principle that could lend stability to our lives. It is an experience of a tremor by and through which the foundations of our experience are shaken.Philosophy’s political task is, however, not to provide any foundation for political life, but rather to address the question of why man is inclined to posit metaphysical foundations and why refuge in ideological principles is sought. Philosophy must instead engage with the groundlessness and negativity permeating human existence as such. In order to provide an analysis of human existence, and how this very groundlessness of existence is exposed in politics, Patočka calls for an “a-subjective phenomenology” that abandons the traditional notion of the subject and of subjectivity. An “a-subjective” phenomenological analysis is central for the present investigation. The author shows that it is only by and through Patočka’s a-subjective phenomenology that his political thought can be understood; out of his distinctive phenomenological analyses, the negativity, instability and groundlessness of human existence is brought to the fore. Politically, this negativity manifests itself in two phenomena, which, when taken together, constitute the very bedrock for politics: freedom and human coexistence. Human existence is neither stable nor self-sufficient.  On the contrary, it is always already exposed to others, always already engaged in the self-transcending movement of its freedom. Freedom and coexistence are in this respect two interrelated expressions of the inherent negativity of human existence and two phenomena that, accordingly, occupy a privileged position in this study. The author seeks to show that it is by way of an in-depth analysis of freedom and coexistence that the question of politics can be addressed in the work of Patočka since they give testament to the trembling, unnerving, and disorienting nature of politics.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback

Gustav Strandberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Reformer og ressourcer / Reforms and Resources: Rapporter til det 29. Nordiske Historikermøde / Proceedings of the 29th Congress of Nordic Historians. (1 udg.) Aalborg. (Studier i historie, arkiver og kulturarv, Vol. 7). Aalborg : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Tourism Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

European Journal of Psychological Assessment 2017, 33 (3): 207-217.

This article presents the cross-cultural validation of the Entitlement Attitudes Questionnaire, a tool designed to measure three facets of psychological entitlement: active, passive, and revenge entitlement. Active entitlement was defined as the tendency to protect individual rights based on self-worthiness. Passive entitlement was defined as the belief in obligations to and expectations toward other people and institutions for the fulfillment of the individual's needs. Revenge entitlement was defined as the tendency to protect one's individual rights when violated by others and the tendency to reciprocate insults. The 15-item EAQ was validated in a series of three studies: the first one on a general Polish sample (N = 1,900), the second one on a sample of Polish students (N = 199), and the third one on student samples from 28 countries (N = 5,979). A three-factor solution was confirmed across all samples. Examination of measurement equivalence indicated partial metric invariance of EAQ for all national samples. Discriminant and convergent validity of the EAQ was also confirmed.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Magdalena A. Zemojtel-Piotrowska

Iwo Nord

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Scando-Slavica 2017, 63 (1): 43-59.

The aim of this paper is to reconsider the doctrine of Socialist Realism against the backdrop of the tradition of modern realism as an aesthetic form of instructing the modern subject through sentimental political education. Socialist Realism is here considered as a school for instructing the reader to an understanding of historical and social reality that is based on an idea of a transference between reality and literature proper to modern realism. I look in particular at Fedor Gladkov’s rewritings of Cement to examine how reality and literature fuse in a narrative describing the genesis of an oeuvre. I argue that what is characteristic for Gladkov is that he as a writer was willing to learn how to write in the image of Gor′kij because he considered literature as a school of learning how to write and at the same time how to acquire the correct awareness and knowledge of historical reality. This was also what guided him in the editions. The reason for doing so was that he was set on reality, and not on the technique of writing.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Tora Lane

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Revolution och existens. Stockholm : Ersatz, 2017. 133-156.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Revolution och existens. Stockholm : Ersatz, 2017. 81-96.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marcia Cavalcante

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Revolution och existens. Stockholm : Ersatz, 2017. 115-132.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gustav Strandberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Transnational Ukraine?. : Ibidem-Verlag, 2017. 89-114.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2017, X (1-2): 100-110.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

It has been suggested that regionalism is defined “as an economic process whereby economic flows grow more rapidly among a given group of states [in the same region] than between these states and those located elsewhere”. In this paper we approach the economic underpinnings for the Baltic Sea Region by analysing the developments with regard to trade and investment in the quarter of a century that has passed since the fall of the communist regimes that divided the European continent At the same time we look into the political developments that brought the 2009 adoption of the European Union’s first macroregional strategy, the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. The strategy was a symbolic second milestone with regard to the political endeavours to reintegrate the continent; the first being the 2004 enlargement. Having transformed the Baltic Sea from a ‘Mare Dividum’ to a European ‘Mare Nostrum’ was indeed also a sign of the success of such integrative political processes.However, it may also be argued that the perceived need for a specific strategy in order to further and deepen the integration and reduce the economic gaps within the European Union gives an indication that there was more to be wished for with regard to this region. Further, more recent political developments in Europe as such as well as the constituent countries of this macroregion has cast some doubts on the future. In this paper we ask ourselves whether developments with regard to investments and trade are in congruence with the notion of the building of one integrated region; does it make economic sense to talk about a Baltic Sea Region or is the eastwest divide still present? For example, to what extent have the developments with regard to foreign direct investments proved sustainable? What sectors are leading the way and which are lagging? What divisions remain to be tackled? These are some of the questions that this paper attempts to address based upon a thorough analysis of the existing sources with regard to foreign direct investment and trade flows. In addition, in a concluding section, we open up an analysis on whether recent political development risk nullifying the progress made on the economic arena – or whether Brexit and connected developments are actually reinforcing the European macroregional agenda?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mikael LönnborgMikael Olsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

ENTER forum

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michael Rafferty

Mikael Lönnborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

ENTER forum

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Substance Use & Misuse 2017, 52 (12): 1616-1623.

BACKGROUND: Inhalant use by children and adolescents has been linked to an increased risk of multiple drug use, mental health problems and antisocial behavior.OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between the frequency of inhalant use and psychiatric diagnoses among incarcerated delinquent youths in Russia.METHODS: A total of 370 incarcerated delinquents from a juvenile correction center in Northern Russia were assessed by means of a semi-structured psychiatric interview and by self-reports.RESULTS: Compared to non-users (N = 266), inhalant users (N = 104) reported higher rates of PTSD, early onset conduct disorder, ADHD, alcohol abuse and dependence, as well as higher levels of antisocial behavior, impulsiveness and more psychopathic traits. Frequent inhalant users also reported the highest rates of co-occurring psychopathology.CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that inhalant use in delinquents is frequent and may require additional clinical measures to address the issue of psychiatric comorbidity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Linnea Zachrison

Andrew Stickley


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ambio 2017, 46 (8): 878-893.

The forest landscape across the Nordic and Baltic regions hosts numerous lakes and watercourses, which must be included in forest management. In this study, national policy designs regarding protection zones for surface waters on forest land were reviewed and compared for the Nordic countries, Estonia and Latvia. The focus was how each country regulates protection zones, whether they are voluntary or mandatory, and the rationale behind adopting a low or high degree of prescriptiveness. Iceland and Denmark had a low degree of policy prescriptiveness, whereas Norway, Estonia and Latvia had a high degree of prescriptiveness. Sweden and Finland relied to a large extent on voluntary commitments. The prescribed zone widths within the region ranged from 1 m to 5 km. The results indicated that land-use distribution, forest ownership structure and historical and political legacies have influenced the varying degrees of prescriptiveness in the region.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Eva Ring

Johanna Johansson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

European Journal of Cultural Studies 2017, 20 (3): 285-306.

The proliferation and recycling of Soviet popular culture and history is a central ingredient of post-Soviet film and television production, leading to accusations that the Russian media is nurturing nostalgia. Nostalgia can hardly account for the manifold uses of the Soviet past in contemporary Russian television programming. Nevertheless, in the aftermath of the Crimean annexation, it became evident that nostalgia for a strong empire with a strong ruling hand' was part of Putin's symbolic politics for several years. Keeping these considerations in mind, this article investigates how nostalgia extends into the domain of television and becomes an element of symbolic politics, employing a case study of two documentaries produced during Putin's presidency to focus the analysis. This study also examines how contemporary Russian television uses footage and film clips from the socialist period and witness testimonies to dismantle' popular myths.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina Kalinina

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

International Political Science Review 2017, : -.

Based on data from a survey conducted in Saint Petersburg in 2013, this article sheds new light on attitudes towards fatherhood in contemporary Russia. We explore what norms are held concerning fatherhood, how these attitudes are related to age, sex, education and income as well as to ideal?typical models established in previous research on fatherhood from Western Europe and the US. Thus, the article also discusses what explanatory value established theoretical models have for the Russian context. Norms of the role of the father in the family are related to general norms of masculinity and, hence, are an important part of the study of politics and the political climate in a society. The results show that there are several fatherhood ideals present in contemporary Northwestern Russia: a traditional breadwinner model, an active fatherhood model as well as what we refer to as a marginalized fatherhood model. The latter has not been substantially identified in previous research, and may tentatively be identified as a legacy of the Soviet era.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johnny Rodin

Joakim Ekman

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Cultural Journalisn in the Nordic Countries. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2017. 111-133.

This chapter compares how Nordic public service media institutions (Finland: YLE; Norway: NRK; Sweden: SVT/SR) de ne and interpret their remits regarding cultural news. Relying on policy documents, interviews with managing cultural news editors and a sample week’s broadcast and online cultural news output, the results show distinctive national di erences in the ways cultural news is conceived, the resources and organisation of the cultural news desks, and di erences in news content during the week studied. e countries are most similar in their broad popular culture o ering, and by that fact that all the companies provide broader cultural news coverage on their websites than in their broadcast versions. However, the distinctions between the online and o ine platforms are less clear than those between the three countries. So, despite the commonalities of the Nordic media model, the values and practices of cultural journalism show enough di erences to warrant further study. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Heikki Hellman

Andreas Widholm


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Geopolitics 2017, 2 (3): 665-692.

The essays collected in this forum discuss the geopolitical legacy of the Russian Revolution of 1917, one of the most momentous political events of the twentieth century. From a range of different academic disciplines and perspectives, the authors consider how the profound transformations in society and politics were refracted through space and geography, and how enduring these refractions proved to be. The authors focus on three themes that have been dominant in Russian affairs over the past century: 1)the problem of center-periphery relations, 2)the civilizational dynamics of Russia’s self-identification in relation to Europe and to Asia, and 3)the geopolitics of national identity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

P. Richardson

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Europe Faces Europe. Bristol : Intellect Ltd., 2017. 35-61.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Cederberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Studies in Practical Knowledge


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Europe Faces Europe. Bristol : Intellect Ltd., 2017. 133-151.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Europe Faces Europe. Bristol : Intellect Ltd., 2017. 153-177.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Katarina Macleod

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Art History


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Europe Faces Europe. Bristol : Intellect Ltd., 2017. 93-132.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Europe Faces Europe. Bristol : Intellect Ltd., 2017. 1-34.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Europe Faces Europe. Bristol : Intellect Ltd., 2017. 179-235.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Rossijskaja istorija 2017, 1 : 148-156.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Renat Bekkin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Social Identities 2017, : 1-14.

Whereas migration research has been heavily influenced by the individualization paradigm, studies on return migration have been more inspired by theories on attachment and belonging. It is common for this kind of research to assert that the main motivations for returning are social contacts and a homing desire. Although this article does not question the importance of such motivations for some, it does argue that return migration needs to be more problematized, not least by studying people who have decided not to return. Based on interviews with highly skilled Estonians, this article suggests that return decisions are influenced by three types of comparisons: social, temporal, and intra-subjective. The first two comparisons have been discussed to some degree in migration literature; however, a focus on intra-subjective comparisons – in which people compare different parts of their identity in order to decide on a potential return – has been scarce. This article suggests that, in line with the individualization of social relationships, but also with the introduction of a new EU mobility space, it is the latter type of comparison that is becoming increasingly widespread.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maarja Saar

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

After falling under the power of the Russian Crown, the Northern Black Sea steppe from the end of eighteenth century crystallized as the Russian government’s prime venue for socioeconomic and sociocultural reinvention and colonization. Vast ethnic, sociocultural and even ecological changes followed.  Present study is preoccupied with the marriage of the immigrant population from the German lands who came to the region in the course of its state orchestrated colonization, and was officially categorized as “German colonists.” The book illuminates the multiple ways in which marriage and household formation among the colonists was instrumentalized by the imperial politics in the Northern Black Sea steppe, and conditioned by socioeconomic rationality of its colonization. Marriage formation and dissolution among the colonists were gradually absorbed into the competencies of the colonial vertical power. Intending to control colonist marriage and household formation through the introduced marriage regime, the Russian government and its regional representatives lacked the actual means to exert this control at the local level. On the ground, however, imperial politics was mediated by the people it targeted, and by the functionaries tasked with its implementation. As the study reveals, the paramount importance was given to functional households and sustainable farms based on non-conflictual relations between parties. Situated on the crossroads of state, church, community, and personal interests, colonist marriage engendered clashes between secular and ecclesiastical bodies over the supremacy over it. The interplay of colonization as politics, and colonization as an imperial situation with respect to the marriage of the German colonists is explored in this book by concentrating on both norms and practices. Another important consideration is the ways gender and colonization constructed and determined one another reciprocally, both in legal norms and in actual practices. Secret divorces and unauthorized marriages, open and hidden defiance, imitations and unruliness, refashioning of rituals and discourses, and desertions – a number of strategies and performances which challenged and negotiated the marriage regime in the region, were scholarly examined for the first time in this book. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Per Bolin

Julia Malitska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are a class of anxiolytic and anti-depressant drugs. SSRIs act on the evolutionarily ancient serotonergic system which is virtually identical throughout the vertebrate phylum. Serotonin is involved in a wide range of processes ranging from neuronal and craniofacial embryonic development to regulation of behaviour. However, SSRIs are also emerging pollutants, mainly entering the environment via sewage treatment plants. Since the serotonergic system is virtually identical in humans and other animals, exposed animals will be affected in similar ways as humans and suspicions are rising that ecologically important behaviours may be affected in subtle ways. Using the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) as model organisms, this thesis focuses on the behavioural effects of SSRIs in fish. The SSRI used throughout this thesis is citalopram, which has been found in fish in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea and other parts of the world.Effects on behaviour were investigated using several different tests measuring stress response, feeding behaviour, aggression and locomotor activity. Anxiolytic effects of 0.1 μg/l, 1.5 μg/l 15 μg/l were investigated as well as effects of 0.15 μg/l and 1.5 μg/l on feeding behaviour. Because serotonin is involved in the development of the nervous system, the effects of developmental exposure to 1.5 μg/l was studied after 100 days of remediation. Finally, because SSRIs rarely occur alone in natural waters, the effects on zebrafish of citalopram in a cocktail scenario, with the anxiogenic compound 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2 ) was also investigated. Citalopram was found to have anxiolytic effects on the three-spined stickleback at 0.1 μg/l, 1.5 μg/l and 15 μg/l.Citalopram also suppressed feeding behaviour within a week of exposure and at concentrations as low as 0.15 μg/l. Developmental exposure to 1.5 μg/l for 30 days was found to increase aggression and feeding behaviour and to reduce locomotor activity. The changes were persistent and remained in adult fish. In the cocktail scenario, citalopram in single-substance exposure had anxiolytic effects on one parameter in the novel tank test at 0.1 μg/l. Citalopram enhanced the anxiogenic effects of EE2 in the novel tank test, but in the scototaxis test citalopram appeared to counteract the effects of EE2. It is concluded that citalopram has the potential to affect behaviour in fish at concentrations that have been found in close proximity of sewage treatment plants.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Håkan Olsén

Martin Kellner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Medicina (Kaunas) 2017, 53 (2): 114-121.

Previous research has highlighted the role of self-rated health (SRH) as an important predictor of mortality. With substantial ethnic differences in SRH and mortality reported in Estonia, this study aims to examine the ethnic variation in SRH–mortality association in this setting. Materials and methods The baseline data come from nationally representative 1996 Estonian Health Interview Survey. Individual records of 3983 respondents in the 25–79 age group were linked with mortality data with 17 years follow-up time. The association between SRH and all-cause mortality was analysed using the Cox regression for two ethnic groups and separately for men and women. Results Among ethnic Estonians, both men and women with bad or very bad SRH had about 60% higher mortality compared to those with good or very good SRH even after adjustment for age, socioeconomic and health-related variables. In contrast, SRH did not predict mortality among non-Estonian men and women. A strong and universal inverse association with mortality was found for personal income. Education (among men) and occupation (among women) predicted mortality only among non-Estonians, whereas ever smoking was associated with mortality in Estonian men and women. Overweight women had lower mortality risk compared to women in normal weight category. Conclusions We found considerable ethnic variation in SRH–mortality association and in socioeconomic predictors of mortality. Further research, preferably focusing on cause-specific mortality and reporting heterogeneity of SRH could potentially shed further light on ethnic differences in SRH–mortality association in Estonia and more generally on socioeconomic inequalities in mortality in Eastern Europe.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mall Leinsalu

Rainer Reile


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Bristol : Intellect Ltd., 2017.

Europe Faces Europe examines Eastern European perspectives on European identity. The contributors to this volume map narratives of Europe rooted in Eastern Europe, examining their relationship to philosophy, journalism, social movements, literary texts, visual art, and popular music. Moving the debate and research on European identity beyond the geographical power center, the essays explore how Europeanness is conceived of in the dynamic region of Eastern Europe. Offering a fresh take on European identity, Europe Faces Europe comes at an important time, when Eastern Europe and European identity are in an important and vibrant phase of transition.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Fornäs

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Biological Oceanography of the Baltic Sea. : Springer Netherlands, 2017. 23-84.

"Why is the Baltic Sea so special to live in", is the main question the authors here give several arguments or answers for. Geographical position, geological development, hydrographical features, climate and physical drivers together create the Baltic Sea environment. The Baltic Sea water is brackish and characterized by pronounced salinity gradients, both in horizontal and vertical directions, because of the large volume of freshwater runoff from over 100 rivers, which mixes with the saline water from the Kattegat that enters the Baltic Sea via narrow shallow straits. Being a semi-enclosed continental sea with a large drainage area compared to its water volume , the Baltic Sea ecosystem is heavily impacted by the surrounding landmasses. The water residence time in the Baltic Sea is long (30–40 years), and therefore discharged nutrients and toxic compounds circulate within the sea for a long time, which contributes to its vulnerability to eutrophication and chemical contamination by hazardous substances. The Baltic Sea Area is geologically young and the Baltic Sea ecosystem is extremely young in an evolutionary perspective. Only few macroscopic species are fully adapted to its low-salinity environment. In an ecosystem-wide perspective, the large-scale Baltic Sea gradient is the principal ecological characteristic of the Baltic Sea.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pauline Snoeijs-Leijonmalm

Elinor Andren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 2017, 11 : -.

The synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) is an endocrine disrupting compound of concern due to its persistence and widespread presence in the aquatic environment. Effects of developmental exposure to low concentrations of EE2 in fish on reproduction and behavior not only persisted to adulthood, but have also been observed to be transmitted to several generations of unexposed progeny. To investigate the possible biological mechanisms of the persistent anxiogenic phenotype, we exposed zebrafish embryos for 80 days post fertilization to 0, 3 and 10 ng/L EE2 (measured concentrations 2.14 and 7.34 ng/L). After discontinued exposure, the animals were allowed to recover for 120 days in clean water. Adult males and females were later tested for changes in stress response and shoal cohesion, and whole-brain gene expression was analyzed with RNA sequencing. The results show increased anxiety in the novel tank and scototaxis tests, and increased shoal cohesion in fish exposed during development to EE2. RNA sequencing revealed 34 coding genes differentially expressed in male brains and 62 in female brains as a result of EE2 exposure. Several differences were observed between males and females in differential gene expression, with only one gene, sv2b, coding for a synaptic vesicle protein, that was affected by EE2 in both sexes. Functional analyses showed that in female brains, EE2 had significant effects on pathways connected to the circadian rhythm, cytoskeleton and motor proteins and synaptic proteins. A large number of non-coding sequences including 19 novel miRNAs were also differentially expressed in the female brain. The largest treatment effect in male brains was observed in pathways related to cholesterol biosynthesis and synaptic proteins. Circadian rhythm and cholesterol biosynthesis, previously implicated in anxiety behavior, might represent possible candidate pathways connecting the transcriptome changes to the alterations to behavior. Further the observed alteration in expression of genes involved in synaptogenesis and synaptic function may be important for the developmental modulations resulting in an anxiety phenotype. This study represents an initial survey of the fish brain transcriptome by RNA sequencing after long-term recovery from developmental exposure to an estrogenic compound.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Thomas Källman

Inger Porsch-Hällström

Kristina Volkova

Nasim Reyhanian Caspillo

Patrik DinnétzTove Porseryd

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

The present investigation discusses the phenomenological concept of the phenomenon through an interpretation of the meaning of the negativity of the phenomenon in the philosophical works of Martin Heidegger, Jan Patočka and Eugen Fink. This negativity is thematised in terms of a loss and a privation that leads to a description of the appearing of the phenomenon as a sublime event, which exposes existence to an absence of meaning. A formulation of the absence in question as a dynamic movement of existence opens a new perspective on what it means to do phenomenology: phenomenological thinking does not begin with the immediate givenness of appearance, but through the trembling of meaning in the experience of a loss of the phenomenon.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback

Krystof Kasprzak

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Utbildningens revolutioner. Uppsala : Uppsala Studies of History and Education (SHED), 2017. 249-266.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Andreas Åkerlund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

The national parks in the Carpathian Mountains along the Polish and Slovak border represent encompassing policy agendas that strive to balance biodiversity conservation and social welfare tasks. These countries have, during the last 25 years, undergone rapid transformation from socialist regimes to liberal democracies, and this transformation has affected the political, social and economic spheres. The accession to the European Union (EU) introduced demands for further changes, such as closer integration of conservation and socioeconomic development and inclusive, transparent and accountable decision-making that are based on participatory mechanisms.This thesis explores key challenges and opportunities for nature conservation policy and practice at the local level in a context of post-socialist legacies and Europeanization. Multi-level governance, Europeanization, and post-socialist studies are used as theoretical vehicles for the analysis of four transboundary national parks: Pieninsky national parks (NP) in both Poland and Slovakia and Bieszczady NP [Poland] and Poloniny NP [Slovakia].The results of this study show that the early designation of the studied parks as protected areas prevented their exploitation and enabled preservation of important landscapes, which currently are highly valued at the European level. These nature conservation regimes have created tangible restrictions on the possible economic uses of these areas. However, rural development alternatives depend on a broader set of local, national and global factors such as the structure of the local economy and employment, the prioritization of nature conservation in national policies, investors’ interest, and increasing urbanization. Europeanization provided opportunities for local actors to benefit from additional funding made available for nature conservation and rural development. At the same time, demands for participatory decision-making posed significant procedural and conceptual challenges to achieving transparent, inclusive and accountable governance. The prevalence of informal practices in local policy-making and the lack of trust in state authorities pose further challenges to formal participatory processes. The opportunities of local actors to reach out across levels to express their interests remain scarce and are not institutionalized, whereas the multi-level characteristics of modern governance indirectly shape local processes by defining common legal and policy frameworks. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Björn Hassler

Natalya Yakusheva

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: The Barents and the Baltic Sea region. Rovaniemi : Historical Association of Northern Finland, 2017. 143-168.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region. London : Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. 201-220.

This chapter compares public attitudes to environmental protection in Estonia with those in neighbouring Baltic states. Data from the Estonian Environmental Survey (The Chair of Environmental Economics. Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, 2010) and ISSP Environment III are compared and analysed using an ordered logit. Support for environmental protection is measured in the form of willingness of individuals to make financial sacrifices through higher prices and higher taxes or accepting a cut in their standard of living, in order to protect the environment. Results show that the demand for the protection of the environment tends to increase with income. There are some differences between public attitudes in terms of willingness to accept cuts in the standard of living and willingness to pay higher taxes and prices. Higher education is another determinant of support for environmental protection, particularly in Estonia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sirje Pädam

Ranjula Bali Swain

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Economics


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. 1-3.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ranjula Bali Swain

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Economics


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems 2017, 18 (3): 858-871.

Laminated, organic-rich silts and clays with high dissolved gas content characterize sediments at IODP Site M0063 in the Landsort Deep, which at 459 m is the deepest basin in the Baltic Sea. Cores recovered from Hole M0063A experienced significant expansion as gas was released during the recovery process, resulting in high sediment loss. Therefore, during operations at subsequent holes, penetration was reduced to 2 m per 3.3 m core, permitting expansion into 1.3 m of initially empty liner. Fully filled liners were recovered from Holes B through E, indicating that the length of recovered intervals exceeded the penetrated distance by a factor of >1.5. A typical down-core logarithmic trend in gamma density profiles, with anomalously low-density values within the upper ∼1 m of each core, suggests that expansion primarily occurred in this upper interval. Thus, we suggest that a simple linear correction is inappropriate. This interpretation is supported by anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data that indicate vertical stretching in the upper ∼1.5 m of expanded cores. Based on the mean gamma density profiles of cores from Holes M0063C and D, we obtain an expansion function that is used to adjust the depth of each core to conform to its known penetration. The variance in these profiles allows for quantification of uncertainty in the adjusted depth scale. Using a number of bulk 14C dates, we explore how the presence of multiple carbon source pathways leads to poorly constrained radiocarbon reservoir age variability that significantly affects age and sedimentation rate calculations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

S. P. Obrochta

Thomas Andrén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Applications of Paleoenvironmental Techniques in Estuarine Studies. : Springer Netherlands, 2017. 615-662.

The past of the Baltic Sea has been intensively investigated using a wealth of techniques. By far the largest number of studies has focused on sea level and salinity changes, driven by global climate and isostatic crustal rebound after the Baltic Sea emerged underneath the Weichselian Ice Sheet ca. 15,000 cal. years BP. The post-glacial history of the Baltic has included both freshwater and brackish water stages depending on the connection of the Baltic Sea with the world’s oceans. As the Baltic is one of the most polluted sea areas in the world, many studies have also focused on both the long-term trends in nutrients and productivity and the relatively recent anthropogenic eutrophication. The long-term changes in the trophic state of the Baltic Sea have been found to be linked to changes in climate, which controls freshwater discharge from the catchment and weathering rates, as well as marine water inflow from the North Sea. The productivity of the Baltic Sea has followed major climate patterns: it was high during warm periods and lower during phases of deteriorating climate. Recent eutrophication of the Baltic Sea can mainly be explained by a marked increase in discharge of nutrients caused by a growing population and changes in the agricultural practice, although long-term climate variability also plays a part. Signs of recovery have recently been detected, however, the Baltic Sea is still far from its pre-industrial trophic state.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kaarina Weckström

Elinor Andren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Gender, Place and Culture 2017, 24 (2): 288-299.

Sexual politics play a key role in anti-Muslim narratives. This has been observed by scholarship problematising liberal feminist approaches towards ‘non-Western’ subjects focusing on countries such as France, the USA and the Netherlands. Yet interrogations into how these debates play out in European national contexts that are located outside of the European ‘West’ have attracted significantly less scholarly attention. Drawing on qualitative data collected in Poland this article aims to begin to fill this gap by analysing the centrality of feminist discourses within Islamophobic agendas in Poland. The article asks how discourses around women’s rights are mobilised simultaneously, and paradoxically, by both secular and Catholic groups in ‘post-communist’ Poland. By showcasing how feminist sentiments are employed by ideologically opposing groups, we sketch out some of the complexities in the ways Islamophobia operates in a Central and Eastern European context.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kaisa Narkowicz

Konrad Pędziwiatr


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

-

This thesis investigates the narrated experiences of a number of individuals that migrated to Argentina from Russia and Ukraine in the wake of the fall of the Soviet Union. The over-arching aim of this thesis is to study the ways in which these migrants navigated the social reality in Argentina, with regards to available physical, material, and socioeconomic positions as well as with regards to their narrated self-understandings and identifications. The empirical data consists of ethnographic in-depth interviews and participatory observation from Buenos Aires between the years 2011 and 2014. Through the theoretical frameworks of political discourse theory, critical race studies, auto-ethnography, and theories on coloniality, the author examines questions of migration, mobility, race, class, and gender in the processes of re-establishing a life in a new context. The interviewees were not only directly affected by the collapse of the USSR in the sense that it drastically changed their terrain of possible futures as well as retroactive understandings of their pasts, but they also began their lives in Argentina during the turmoil of the economic crisis that culminated in 2001. Central to this thesis is how these dislocatory events impacted the interviewees’ possibilities and limitations for living the life they had expected, and thus how discursive structures affect subject positions and identifications, and thereby create specific conditions for different relocatory trajectories. By focusing on how these individuals narrate their reasons for migration and their integration into Argentine labor and housing markets, the author demonstrates the role Argentine and East European history, as well as the neoliberal restructuring of the postsocialist region and Argentina in the 1990’s, had for self-understandings, subject positions, identities, and mobility. Various intersections of power, and particularly the making of race and whiteness, are important for the way that the interviewees negotiated subject positions and identifications. The author addresses how affect and hope played a part in these processes and how downward mobility was articulated and made meaningful. She also examines how participants’ ideas about a “good life” were related to understandings of the past, questions of race, social inequality, and a logic of coloniality.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mats Lindqvist

Jenny Ingridsdotter

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

This study analyses the administrative and economic career of Francesco De Gratta (1613–1676) as Royal Postmaster, Royal Secretary, and trader within the postal and fiscal systems of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. This investigation focuses mainly on his network and career strategies and is based on various sources from a number of European archives and libraries, mainly those situated in Italy, Poland and Germany.The study presents the family De Gratta and the familial social actions that Francesco used in order to root his children and family in the Polish-Lithuanian noble culture. Next, the analysis shows that the career of Francesco De Gratta was inextricably correlated with the establishment of the early modern royal postal system in Gdańsk (the city of Gdańsk fulfilled an important bridging role within the Poland-Lithuanian Commonwealth) as well as his close contacts with different Polish kings and queens.The career followed distinct stages, tying him ever closer with the Crown, the nobility as well as the merchants in Gdańsk. It all started with his position as Head Postmaster in Gdańsk, in 1654. In 1661, he became Postmaster General of Royal Prussia, Courland, Semigallia and Livonia. After these initial steps, Francesco immersed in creditor activities and close contacts with the Royal Prussian cities, royal authorities, and not the least different Polish mint masters. He also got involved in the potash trade with his later son-in-law Jan Wawrzyniec Wodzicki, first as his factor and later as a co-owner of Wodzicki’s company. The study finally traces his social and economic advancement by the analysis of Francesco De Gratta’s legacies and their importance for his heirs’ social status.The summary compares the career of Francesco De Gratta with that of other postmasters and mint masters of Italian origin in Poland-Lithuania.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Heiko Droste

Michal Salamonik

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Marine Geology 2017, 387 : 45-57.

The extent of the hypoxic area in the Baltic Sea has rapidly expanded over the past century. Two previous phases of widespread hypoxia, coinciding with the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM; 8–4 ka before present; BP) and the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; 2–0.8 ka BP), have been identified. Relatively little is known about bottom water redox conditions in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea during the Holocene, however. Here we studied the geochemical composition of a sediment sequence from a currently seasonally hypoxic site in the Danish coastal zone, the Little Belt, retrieved during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 347 (Site M0059). The base of the studied sediment sequence consists of clays low in organic carbon (Corg), molybdenum (Mo) and iron sulfides (Fe-sulfides), and rich in iron oxides (Fe-oxides), indicative of a well-oxygenated, oligotrophic (glacial) meltwater lake. An erosional unconformity separates the glacial lake sediments from sediments that are rich in Corg. The absence of Mo, in combination with high Corg/S values, indicates that these sediments were deposited in a highly productive, well-oxygenated freshwater lake. The transition to modern brackish/marine conditions was very rapid, and subsequent continuous sequestration of Mo in the sediment and high ratios of reactive iron (FeHR) over total Fe (FeTOT) suggest (seasonal) hypoxia occurred over the last ~ 8 ka. Maxima in sediment Corg, Mo and FeHR/FeTOT ratios during the HTM and MCA suggest that the hypoxia intensified. Our results demonstrate that the Little Belt is naturally susceptible to the development of seasonal hypoxia. While periods of climatic warming led to increased deoxygenation of bottom waters, high nutrient availability in combination with density stratification were likely the main drivers of hypoxia in this part of the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea during the Holocene.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Niels A.G.M. van Helmond

Thomas Andrén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The politics of Eurasianism. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2017. 39-58.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The politics of Eurasianism. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2017. 1-16.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gonzaldo Pozo

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

-

London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2017.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gonzalo Pozo

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Post-Soviet Affairs 2017, 33 (5): 389-410.

Demographic change has been a key consequence of transition, but few studies trace fertility trends across countries over time. We describe fertility trends immediately before and after the fall of state socialism across 19 Central and Eastern European and Central Asian countries. We found a few common patterns that may reflect economic and political developments. The countries that experienced the most successful transitions and integration into the EU experienced marked postponement of parenthood and a moderate decline in second and third births. Little economic change in the poorest transition countries was accompanied by less dramatic changes in childbearing behavior. In western post-Soviet contexts, and somewhat in Bulgaria and Romania, women became more likely to only have one child but parenthood was not substantially postponed. This unique demographic pattern seems to reflect an unwavering commitment to parenthood but economic conditions and opportunities that did not support having more than one child. In addition, we identify countries that would provide fruitful case studies because they do not fit general patterns.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Aija Duntava

Sunnee Billingsley


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

BMC Public Health 2017, 17 (1): -.

BACKGROUND: Russian suicide mortality rates changed rapidly over the second half of the twentieth century. This study attempts to differentiate between underlying period and cohort effects in relation to the changes in suicide mortality in Russia between 1956 and 2005.METHODS: Sex- and age-specific suicide mortality data were analyzed using an age-period-cohort (APC) approach. Descriptive analyses and APC modeling with log-linear Poisson regression were performed.RESULTS: Strong period effects were observed for the years during and after Gorbachev's political reforms (including the anti-alcohol campaign) and for those following the break-up of the Soviet Union. After mutual adjustment, the cohort- and period-specific relative risk estimates for suicide revealed differing underlying processes. While the estimated period effects had an overall positive trend, cohort-specific developments indicated a positive trend for the male cohorts born between 1891 and 1931 and for the female cohorts born between 1891 and 1911, but a negative trend for subsequent cohorts.CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the specific life experiences of cohorts may be important for variations in suicide mortality across time, in addition to more immediate effects of changes in the social environment.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Aleksei Baburin

Andrew Stickley

Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen

Pär Sparén

Tanya Jukkala


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

This dissertation traces the history of a diagram. The diagram shows four circles of gradually diminishing sizes, lodged one inside the other, like the layers of a circular or spherical body. For a group of artists, curators, architects, and activists centered around Moderna Museet in Stockholm between the mid-1960s and the mid-1970s, the diagram represented a new type of museum: a museological Information Center modeled on the computer, operating as a site for radically democratic social experiments. The four layers stood for different functions: information capture, processing, interface, storage; or, put differently: social spaces and media resources, workshop floors, exhibition facilities, collection.Through close readings of a series of exhibitions and institutional projects in Sweden, the US, and France, this dissertation follows the development of this diagram: its prehistory and formulation, its different implementations, and its direct and indirect effects. It studies Moderna Museet’s original, unrealized project for Kulturhuset in Stockholm, according to which the museum should project its dynamic energies across the city center, serving as a “catalyst for the active forces in society”. It discusses the museum’s confrontation with digital technologies in the late 1960s, through pioneering museological organizations such as the Museum Computer Network in New York. It analyzes the exhibition formats developed in correspondence with the notion of the museum as a “vast experimental laboratory” and a “broadcasting station”: the exhibition as critical information pattern, as tele-commune. And it studies the diagram’s afterlife as one of the models informing the Centre Pompidou in Paris, during that project’s early phases.The Exhibitionary Complex reads these endeavors and visions as attempts to devise a critical understanding of the exhibitionary apparatus in relation to new information environments and media systems. It sheds light on a largely forgotten aspect of the exhibitionary, museological, and cultural history of the late twentieth century, in Sweden and internationally. But it also seeks to establish new models for grasping the exhibition’s singularity and potentials as a cultural and media technological form, in relation to the emergence of new information networks, as they exert increasing control over social, cultural, and political existence.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sven-Olov Wallenstein

Kim West

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Aesthetics


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Focusing on the memories of Estonian refugees moving to Sweden in the wake of World War II, I analyze the concepts of “memory space” and history within the framework of the Escape as a master narrative. Following the research participants to the sites of their memories in Estonia and Sweden today, raised the questions what constitutes a lived memory space, and how is history defined within it?Through a combination of a phenomenological analysis of memory’s lived ex­perience, using Walter Benjamin’s concept of montage as radical remembering and its dialectical relation to history, I show how embodied memories shape their own space, a space not always framed by historical master narratives and identity posi­tions, but rather a searching space that is always changing. Dealing with the politics of place and representations, these memories are constantly loaded and unloaded with meaning. Yet the space of lived memory is not always a creation of meaning. Walking around, searching for traces, a memory space confronts the place and maps its own geography. It turns to a spatial and temporal flow, which intertwines place and experience, and erases the past and future as homogeneous categories. It is a living space of memory, rather than a memorial space of representations.The analysis focuses further on the tensions between remembering as a dialogue with history and memory’s ongoing acts of embodied experience. The position of in-betweenness appears in these stories of escape, not as a state of in-between home and away, past and present, but rather as an ongoing space-making process be­tween different modes and layers of memory. This is a process aware of the constant changes in the understandings of both history and personal experiences, intertwin­ing these new interpretations with embodied memory and thereby constantly add­ing new layers of experience to it. Memory’s tracing illuminates a memory poetics of the meanwhile and the in-between, which refuses historical closure.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kyrre Kverndokk

Irina SandomirskajaMaryam Adjam

Magnus Öhlander


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

London & New York : Routledge, 2017.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gregory Goldenzwaig

Patrik ÅkerSofia JohanssonAnn Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

School of Social Sciences

Gender Studies

Journalism

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

This study is about seven women’s organizations in Belgrade, Serbia and their relations to domestic and international donors during the period 2003-2006. My main research questions focus on their choices of either domestic or international cooperation partners. How and why did the women organize themselves? What factors were essential when selecting donors? In what ways were the organizations influenced by donors?Through interviews, with organization representatives’ concepts such as gift and reciprocity, power and dependency, trust and mistrust and collective identity emerged.  These concepts were used as points of departure for developing deeper understanding of women organizations’ choice of cooperation partners.The women organizations’ basically had two alternatives for cooperation: cooperation with foreign donors which offered funds, organizational development and social networks. Alternately, cooperation with local donors, which offered the equivalent except for the organizational development. Cooperation with the foreign donor has resulted in more professional attitudes to the work that have been desired by other international donors. A result is that they can compete with other women’s organizations’ for international funding. Cooperation with local donors has led to fewer resources but more independent working practices. For these women organizations’ independence was important so they choose partners who, they felt more respected this allowing them to write articles or discuss gender in the media with little external influence. Regardless of the chosen donor the reciprocity is embedded in the relation between the donor and the receiver of aid, which in various ways is beneficial for both parties. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ali Hajighasemi

Sanja Obrenovic

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Energy policies which maintain and extend nuclear energy are often opposed by anti-nuclear movements. Ambitious plans for developing nuclear energy in Russia, constructing a first nuclear plant in Poland, and lifting the ban on nuclear energy while allowing the replacement of old reactors in Sweden are examples of such energy policies. In contrast to the massive anti-nuclear movements of 1970-1990s, recent anti-nuclear movements are not organized as national protest campaigns. This thesis examines repertoires of anti-nuclear movements in the alleged “Nuclear Renaissance” period.  Repertoires of anti-nuclear actions are analyzed from the perspective of discursive and political opportunities of anti-nuclear movements. Discursive opportunities are enabled or hindered in the ordering of nuclear energy discourses, making messages and actions of social movements legitimate or illegitimate. While discourses of anti-nuclear movements are complex, official discourses of nuclear energy featuring arguments about profitability, energy security and environmental security in connection to nuclear energy development, resonate more with broader socio-political developments. Ordering of discourses is established in such a way that expert rhetoric becomes a standard approach for discussing nuclear energy, while references to emotions and subjective matters are unacceptable.Political contexts of anti-nuclear movements provide opportunities for environmental NGOs, one kind of actor in anti-nuclear movements, to pursue nonconfrontational strategies and engage in institutional channels, where they can contribute their expert knowledge. Concurrently, another actor in anti-nuclear movements, local anti-nuclear groups, on the one hand, share argumentative structures with environmental NGOs, and, on the other hand, attempt to mobilize local population and organize local protests. Due to limited opportunities for attention from the national media and focus on local issues, local protests are not featured in the national media, which is crucial for national protest actions.The differences in repertoires between these two kinds of actors and absence of actors opting for mass engagement provide insight into repertoires of anti-nuclear movements as a whole. This thesis demonstrates how discursive opportunities of social movements, which result from competing discourses of movements and their counter-agents, and political opportunities structure repertoires of actions of these movements.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mai-Brith Schartau

Ekaterina Tarasova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Творчество, профессия, индустрия [Creativity, profession, industry]. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University, MediaMir.

Понятие «информационная война» используется сегодня все чаще как в медийных, так и в академических дискурсах. Под информационной войной понимают конфликт, в котором информация становится одним из основных видов оружия (напр., Pantti 2016, Hoskins and O’Loughlin 2010), а т.н. информационный менеджмент – техники распространения дезинформации и попытки влияния на медиа – является одним из основных измерений конфликта (Tumber & Webster 2006). Украинский кризис – события, происходящие в стране с 2013 года: протесты в Киеве («Евромайдан»), смена правительства, присоединение Крыма к Российской Федерации, продолжающееся военное противостояние на востоке страны, - сегодня все чаще становится объектом международных исследований, рассматривающих происходящее как один из ярких примеров «войны нарративов» (Khaldarova and Pantti 2016). Трудности с верификацией информации, пристрастность информационных источников, вовлеченность в конфликт сторонних интересов поставили журналистов, освещающих события на Украине (как украинских, так и представителей других стран), перед вызовом (Pantti 2016).Проблема, которую отмечают при этом некоторые исследователи, - фиксация международного академического сообщества на российских медиа как источнике информационного менеджмента или даже пропаганды (см. Pantti 2016). Лишь немногие исследования предлагают анализ информационного менеджмента внутри Украины (Bolin, Jordan & Ståhlberg 2016). Между тем, даже предварительный взгляд на это медиа-пространство выявляет его неоднородность. Украинское медиа-сообщество оказалось расколото: приверженцы глобальных и «вечных» журналистских идеалов не находят понимания у сторонников «патриотической журналистики». Первые обвиняют вторых в само-цензуре и следовании интересам институтов власти, а вторые первых – в сотрудничестве с «вражескими агентами».Данный исследовательский проект на различных примерах (запрет на определенные российские медиа-продукты; радикальная инициатива по поиску «пособников террористов» среди журналистов – «Миротворец» и др.) рассматривает проблему, с которой столкнулось украинское медиа-сообщество, как частный случай общей тенденции. Эта тенденция может быть обозначена как идеологизация СМИ, что с одной стороны, является результатом, а с другой стороны, благодатной почвой для информационной войны. Этой тенденции противостоят различные инициативы, направленные на сохранение приверженности журналистского сообщества профессиональным принципам и стандартам: например, проект ОБСЕ «Две страны – одна профессия», где Союз журналистов России и Национальный союз журналистов Украины обсуждают противодействие языку вражды, или критикуемое внутри страны сотрудничество между украинскими и зарубежными корреспондентами при освещении событий в зоне АТО на востоке Украины.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning 2017, : -.

How science and policy interact has been a major research focus in the International Relations (IR) tradition, using the epistemic community (EC) concept, as well as in the alternative perspective of Science and Technology Studies (STS). Should science be autonomous and as apolitical as possible in order to ‘speak truth to power’, as suggested by EC or should the inevitable entanglement of science and politics be accepted and embraced so as to make advice more conducive to negotiating the explicit travails of political decision-making as suggested by STS? With this point of departure, we compare similarities and differences between science–policy interactions in the issue areas of eutrophication and fisheries management of the Baltic Sea. To examine how knowledge is mobilised, the concepts of ‘uncertainty’ and ‘coherence’ are developed, drawing on both EC and STS thinking. We then reflect on the explanatory value of these approaches in both cases and discuss how a separation of science and policy-making in the pursuit of achieving scientific consensus leads to ineffectual policies. Drawing on STS thinking, we urge for a re-conceptualisation of coherence in order to accommodate a more reflexive practice of science–policy interactions.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sebastian Linke

Fred SaundersMichael Gilek

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

This PhD thesis in environmental science aims to contribute to the theoretical and empirical understanding of the relation between participation and legitimacy in multi-level environmental governance.It is widely assumed that actor involvement has great potential to improve the legitimacy of nature conservation through long-term acceptance and target achievement. However, local resource conflicts problematize the way a relation between participation and legitimacy is depicted on other administrative levels. Studies exploring the effect that participation has on legitimacy are relatively rare, especially in multi-level arrangements of coastal conservation.In this thesis the relation between participation and legitimacy on the local level is examined, as well as how this relation is conditioned by multi-level governance and power. The relation is empirical studied with two local implementation processes of the Helsinki Convention’s network of marine protected areas (HELCOM MPAs). The cases are located in Sweden.Sweden and the Baltic Sea region are in the forefront of participation in nature conservation, and therefore act as a strong case for the exploration of institutional participation. However, despite apparent political will and international support, the efficiency of actor involvement for nature conservation has been questioned, also for the HELCOM MPA and especially on the local level.Based on the results of this study, I question the assumption that weak legitimacy predominantly is an issue of insufficient information sharing. The findings show that involving actors to legitimize the adoption of strict adherence to a pre-established model of conservation likely fails to create long term support for conservation. Instead, relocation of power to the affected actors seems essential in order to make participation establish legitimacy. It appears important to create room for local influence in the design, management and implementation of a particular conservation area in the particular place/context. In both examined cases, there are elements of participation that support legitimacy, for example the development of a shared vision. There are also elements that hamper legitimacy, such as, for example, the high expectations different actors have on participation to reach consensus on protective values. These unmet expectations seem to fuel conflicts of interests among actors on different levels.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Magnus Boström

Linn Rabe


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Public Health 2017, 145 : 59-66.

Objectives: To analyze the variation in factors associated with mortality risk at different levels of self-rated health (SRH).Study design: Retrospective cohort study.Methods: Cox regression analysis was used to examine the association between mortality and demographic, socioeconomic and health-related predictors for respondents with good, average, and poor SRH in a longitudinal data set from Estonia with up to 18 years of follow-up time.Results: In respondents with good SRH, male sex, older age, lower income, manual occupation, ever smoking, and heavy alcohol consumption predicted higher mortality. These covariates, together with marital status, illness-related limitations, and underweight predicted mortality in respondents with average SRH. For poor SRH, only being never married and having illness-related limitations predicted mortality risk in addition to older age and male sex.Conclusions: The predictors of all-cause mortality are not universal but depend on the level of SRH. The higher mortality of respondents with poor SRH could to a large extent be attributed to health problems, whereas in the case of average or good SRH, factors other than the presence of illness explained outcome mortality.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andrew Stickley

Mall Leinsalu

Rainer Reile


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Avtryck från ovanlandet = Contemporary art from Sápmi. Umeå : BildMuseet, 2017. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Charlotte Bydler

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Art History


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Sámi Art and Aesthetics . Aarhus : Aarhus Universitetsforlag, 2017. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Charlotte Bydler

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Art History


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Baltic Studies 2017, 48 (1): 13-22.

Tara Zahra maintains in her article 'Imagined Noncommunities: National Indifferenceas a Category of Analysis' that many people in the early twentieth century were indifferent to the call of the national movements or oscillated between different national belongings. While finding Zahra's perspective relevant, this article criticizesthe choice of her central analytic concept,'national indifference,'and also questionsthe absence of an integrated gender perspective. Finally, the article queries the general applicability of her theoretical approach. While useful in the analysis of demotic national movements, it is considerably less so when studying elite minoritygroups. This becomes evident when Zahra's theoretical perspective is applied to the Baltic Germans.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christina DouglasPer Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Environmental Policy and Governance 2017, : 244-255.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

A. Udovč

Magnus Boström

Romina Rodela

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: The Walls between Conflict and Peace. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2017. 263-293.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Architecture and Culture 2017, 5 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Tor Lindstrand

Håkan Nilsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Art History


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of General Virology 2017, 98 (3): 413-421.

Every year, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) causes severe central nervous system infection in 10 000 to 15 000 people in Europe and Asia. TBEV is maintained in the environment by an enzootic cycle that requires a tick vector and a vertebrate host, and the adaptation of TBEV to vertebrate and invertebrate environments is essential for TBEV persistence in nature. This adaptation is facilitated by the error-prone nature of the virus's RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, which generates genetically distinct virus variants called quasispecies. TBEV shows a focal geographical distribution pattern where each focus represents a TBEV hotspot. Here, we sequenced and characterized two TBEV genomes, JP-296 and JP-554, from questing Ixodes ricinus ticks at a TBEV focus in central Sweden. Phylogenetic analysis showed geographical clustering among the newly sequenced strains and three previously sequenced Scandinavian strains, Toro-2003, Saringe-2009 and Mandal-2009, which originated from the same ancestor. Among these five Scandinavian TBEV strains, only Mandal-2009 showed a large deletion within the 3' non-coding region (NCR), similar to the highly virulent TBEV strain Hypr. Deep sequencing of JP-296, JP-554 and Mandal-2009 revealed significantly high quasispecies diversity for JP-296 and JP-554, with intact 3' NCRs, compared to the low diversity in Mandal-2009, with a truncated 3' NCR. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis showed that 40% of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms were common between quasispecies populations of JP-296 and JP-554, indicating a putative mechanism for how TBEV persists and is maintained within its natural foci.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

John H-O Pettersson

Magnus Johansson

Naveed Asghar

Patrik Dinnétz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Science of the Total Environment 2017, 574 : 1492-1501.

Contemporary approaches to environmental research are calling for a type of scientific inquiry that is able to bring together the natural and social sciences. This with the aim to advance our understanding of environmental issues and produce synthetic and actionable knowledge meant to address these. Yet, interdisciplinarity research of this type is a demanding and challenging pursuit; many have shown that in certain thematic areas and geographic regions practice falls behind discourse. We bring together ideas about interdisciplinary research collaborations (after Patricia L. Rosenfield) and interdisciplinary epistemic synthesis (after Julie T. Klein) that are used to analyse a sample of research projects funded (from 2006 to 2013) by the Slovene Research Agency. We triangulated interview data (with principal investigators) with document analysis and integrated these with other secondary data. Our results suggest for the sample of environmental projects to be interdisciplinary in a narrow sense, this prevalently within natural and life sciences with little input from the humanities and social sciences. Also, the results obtained suggest that environmental research with unambiguous problem solving objectives is preferred over research with a high degree of abstraction, as involved in theoretical and conceptual work.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Dušan Alašević

Romina Rodela

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of ethnic and migration studies 2017, 43 (3): 441-457.

Although significant scholarly attention has been devoted to the study of mosque conflicts in Europe, up until now most of it has focussed on Western European countries. This has left a significant gap to be filled in the study of mosque tensions in Central and Eastern Europe, where scholarship is scant yet where tensions over constructions of mosques are not less intensive than in the West. Drawing on two recent case studies of mosque constructions in Poland, we argue that a significant shift has taken place in the ways that mosques are perceived, unveiling unprecedented opposition towards their construction. From being largely unproblematic before the Second World War and during the Communist era, mosques have become subjects of fierce public debate. We draw parallels to how anti-mosque arguments raised in Poland fit into a larger European meta-narrative on mosques and Muslims, yet our aim is to situate the paper historically to argue that Polish mosque conflicts must be contextualised within Poland’s unique historical encounter with Islam in order to more accurately make sense of its creeping Islamophobia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

K. Narkowicz

Konrad Pędziwiatr


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 2017, : 98-109.

Connectivity plays an important role in shaping the genetic structure and in evolution of local adaptation. In the marine environment barriers to gene flow are in most cases caused by gradients in environmental factors, ocean circulation and/or larval behavior. Despite the long pelagic larval stages, with high potential for dispersal many marine organisms have been shown to have a fine scale genetic structuring. In this study, by using a combination of high-resolution genetic markers, species hybridization data and biophysical modeling we can present a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary landscape for a keystone species in the Baltic Sea, the blue mussel. We identified distinct genetic differentiation between the West Coast, Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea regions, with lower gene diversity in the Bothnian Sea. Oceanographic connectivity together with salinity and to some extent species identity provides explanations for the genetic differentiation between the West Coast and the Baltic Sea (Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea). The genetic differentiation between the Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea cannot be directly explained by oceanographic connectivity, species identity or salinity, while the lower connectivity to the Bothnian Sea may explain the lower gene diversity. © 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

E. E. Lind

Josefine Larsson

Mikael LönnMats Grahn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television 2017, 37 (2): 315-332.

The sharing of expertise and know-how was an important practice in the early days of television production; delegations from national broadcasters visited each other to negotiate agreements concerning co-production and programme exchange. On one such occasion, in spring 1956, the BBC visited Soviet Central Television and their production facilities in Moscow, Leningrad and Kiev. Using that visit as vantage point, this article examines production values and professional ideologies in relation to the material spaces of television production. The article argues that the British delegation’s encounter with (un)familiar spaces of television production forced them to articulate their own production values in relation to material spaces. The final discussion suggests that the tensions provoked by the discrepancy between production values at Soviet Central Television and at the BBC may inform the main currents of television studies and television history. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Lundgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Zoon Politikon 2016, 7 : 91-113.

This article examines successful mass mobilization against the proposed total ban on abortion, focusing on the Black Protest initiated online in September 2016 and the All-Poland’s Women Strikes which took place on the 3rd and 24th of October 2016. The aim is to explain how the resistance towards the proposed bill emerged and developed over time, and to shed light on the factors behind its success. It is argued that the emergence of and mass participation in the protests resulted from a range of factors including the heightened political climate in Poland and normalization of street protests as a reaction to the closing of regular communication channels between citizens and authorities, as well as an emotional dynamic of mobilization and wide use of social media for sharing information, communication and networking. The success – the government’s decision to reject the project – can be explained as stemming from the mass scale of mobilization but also from favorable political opportunity structure and the lack of popular support for the proposed law. The analysis shows that the protests followed the logic of connective action based on the use of flexible, easily personalized action frames, which were well-embedded in cultural narratives referencing the history of resistance against an oppressive state. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Solidarity in Struggle. Budapest : Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, 2016. 32-41.

This article engages with feminists critiques of neoliberalism, specifically with the influential narrative about the NGO-ization of women’s movement and co-optation of feminism by neo-liberalism (Charkiewicz 2009, Fraser 2011, McRobbie 2009). It argues that while the vision of the feminist actors as “the handmaidens” of neoliberalism accurately captures some aspects of contemporary feminist organizing, it obfuscates others, especially new and original forms of resistance taking place beyond the perimeters of what is usually included in the “Western” context (Aslan and Gambetti 2011, Funk 2012). I discuss some examples of the struggles against neoliberal logic and practices in the Polish context, arguing that while there has been a strong trend towards professionalization and de-politicization of civic activism in the country, during the last decade we can observe a growing resistance against this tendency. The paper concludes with discussing various forms of anti-neoliberal women’s organizing highlighting the opportunities and risks involved in employing them in the context of the local and transnational struggles.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

European journal of education and applied psychology 2016, 1 : 10-13.

Understanding a large spectrum of gender features will help bachelor students to get deeper analysis of nowadays global economy. The results of the research show even that there are some principal differences between students in educational process depending on their own gender background.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Smolander

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Transversal: international journal for the historiography of science 2016, 1 : 12-20.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
David Östlund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

-

HavsUtsikt- Om havsmiljön och Svensk havsforskning 2016, 2 : 16-18.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Petter Thureborn

Sara Sjöling

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Ukraina Moderna 2016, 23 : 275-278.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia Malitska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Przebudzona rewolucja. Warsaw : Fundacja im. Izabeli Jarugi-Nowackiej, 2016. 31-42.

Masowe protesty przeciwko projektowi całkowitego zakazu aborcji w 2016 okazały się sukcesem. Udało się nie tylko zmobilizować do działania setki tysięcy kobiet, ale też wymusić na rządzących zmianę decyzji. Projekt Ordo Iuris został odrzucony po pierwszym czytaniu w Sejmie i choć nie była to z pewnością ostatnia próba zaostrzenia prawa aborcyjnego w Polsce, udało się wygrać przynajmniej tę bitwę. Skala i zasięg protestów pokazują ogromny potencjał zaangażowania kobiet, które nie mieszkają w wielkich miastach i które nie uczestniczyły do tej pory w życiu politycznym, a przynajmniej nie tak aktywnie jak przy okazji Czarnych Protestów. Okazało się, że polskie społeczeństwo obywatelskie nie jest bynajmniej uśpione i apatyczne, ale aktywne i gotowe do wyjścia na ulice, gdy sytuacja tego wymaga. Ten rozdział stara się odpowiedzieć na pytania: dlaczego kobiety zmobilizowały się właśnie w tym momencie i jak to się stało, że w 2016 roku doszło do masowego buntu Polek.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Reproductive BioMedicine and Society Online 2016, 3 : 126-133.

This article examines the public debate on reproductive technologies in contemporary Poland, focusing on the rhetoricalstrategies used by the main opponents of IVF: conservative politicians representing the leading parties in the Polish parliament andthe representatives of the Catholic Church. The analysis highlights the exclusionary logic inscribed in the construction of the maincategories of political subjects in this debate, revealing important limitations of reproductive citizenship in the Polish context. Thestudy draws on a variety of texts published in print and electronic media between 2007 and 2015, including articles on infertility andreproductive technologies published in the main Polish daily and weekly print publications, online resources (web pages, forums andFacebook pages), documents issued by the representatives of the Church, politicians and experts, e.g. open letters, commentaries,information for the media and interviews.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elzbieta Korolczuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Svenska Dagbladet 2016, 17/5 : 5-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mats Braun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Mezinárodní vztahy 2016, 51 (1): 56-67.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jan Karlas

Mats Braun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (4): 83-87.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Imprópia 2016, 5 : 15-23.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Prague : Metropolitan University Prague Press, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Gromilova

Mats Braun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Transgressive Women in Modern Russian and East European Cultures. New York : Routledge, 2016. 192-208.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

N. Azhgikhina

Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Russische und Sowjetische Geschichte im Film. New York : ALTIJA, 2016. 129-150.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Andrej Kotljarchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Гендер и СМИ [Gender and Media]. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism Lomonosov Moscow State University, 2016. 197-222.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Государство, религия, церковь в России и за рубежом 2016, 4 : 118-147.

This article looks into the history of Muslim community of Petrograd Leningrad during the Soviet time. The author pays special attention to its little-known and understudied aspects by referring to a wide range of sources from oral memoirs to diary extracts. Of particular importance are photographic materials from state and private photo archives. The picture helps to provide a broader view of the history of Muslim community, both from the standpoint of a photographer and through the eyes of believers themselves. Special focus is made on the life of the two imam-khatibs of the Leningrad Cathedral Mosque: Yakub Halekov and Hafiz Mahmutov. The author examines how official and unofficial leaders and institutions governing TatarMuslim community in Leningrad and a number of towns in the Leningrad region emerged and worked. Some photographs coming from private archives often serve as a starting point for a broader study of forms of Islam in the Soviet Union.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Renat Bekkin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Lambda Nordica 2016, 1-2 : 46-79.

White femininity embodies a complex position. It manages to occupy the presumed empty, universal position, which is held to be racially unmarked, untouched, and clean, meanwhile whiteness is always already articulated from a somatechnical knowledge and practice. This article discusses how “natural” makeup acts as an (in)visible extension (and enabling) of white (un)clean Russian and Swedish femininity, and also as a way to establish boundaries between “natural” and “artificial” white bodies. Makeup, as an extension of the white femininity, sculptures temporal fantasies about the present and the past, as well as fantasies of modern and outmoded bodies. These kinds of separations allow for a structuring of asymmetric differences between white modern/“civilized” and non-modern/“non-civilized” femininities. The idea of natural/clean bodies (and their practice of modification) privileges some white femininities over others, through the way that artificial/“impure” expressions are associated with the part of whiteness that is “marked” by devalued class and race expressions. This infected forms of whiteness thus acts as the Other in relation to the clean subjectivity of whiteness and operates as a flexibility that keeps the radiance of whiteness intact and unchallenged. Based on this paradox the article wishes to show how white femininity should be understood in terms of a fantasm and construction, and it is as a fantasm the opportunity arises to reject various forms of femininities, meanwhile the fantasm have different components depending on where it is formulated.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Lönn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Biskop Brasks måltider. Stockholm : Bokförlaget Atlantis, 2016. 266-284.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ingvar Svanberg

Madeleine Bonow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Becoming a Journalist. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2016. 25-37.

This article compares systems of journalism education in the Nordic countries, focusing on how education programmes for journalists first emerged. The theoretical perspectiveof the sociology of journalism education used by sociologist Margaret Archer, who viewsnational educational systems as always being shaped through a struggle between interest groups. The questions are when education programmes for journalists were founded, who initiated them and how the process of founding schools and programmes progressed. In addition to these questions, the article discusses the emergence of journalism educationin relation to the party press system and to the process of professionalisation. Theres pective developments of journalism education in the Nordic countries emerged in similar patterns. The apprentice system was, at first, combined with short courses arranged by press organisations, and then step-by-step replaced by journalism schools. In this process, the press organisations lost control over journalism education, even if theytried to maintain control through independent schools or through cooperation with universities. The mix of subjects in the journalist training curriculum has been discussedin all countries, centred on the balance between theoretical and vocational subjects.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elin Gardeström

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (4): 12-22.

This article examines the policies on drug control and regulation in Russia. We demonstrate that, although agencies involved in drug con-trol and regulation are important for the reproduction of differentiated practices of drug use, they formulate a rather homogeneous image of a drug user as an unhealthy deviant and criminal, and an unequivocal threat to society. At the same time, in the process of policy realization, the most vulnerable groups of users become the main target of public intervention. As a result, stigmatization and violence against these groups becomes institutionalized and legitimized. Moreover, drug control and regulation resonate with a broader range of public policies and spill over into parts of society not associated with illicit drug use.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Alexandra Dmitieva

Zhanna Kravchenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Social Work


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nordicom Review 2016, 37 (Special Issue): 41-55.

Cooperation and communication play an important role for environmental governance. This holds true for the Baltic Sea in Northern Europe, one of the most disturbed ecosystems in the world, where insufficient cooperation between different stakeholders is one reason for goal failure. This article addresses the linkages between (media) framing on the one hand, and cooperation on the other. The case in focus is a set of negotiations related to the Baltic Sea Action Plan, the most central governance strategy in the Baltic Sea region. Our results show that in order to influence political decision-making, key stakeholders compete over the power to define and interpret problems, causes and solutions to an extent impeding cooperation. We focus the analysis on eutrophication, which we show to be a complex and controversial topic, framed in incompatible ways by different stakeholders.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mikael Karlsson

Anna Maria Jönsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Göteborg : Nordicom, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jan Fredrik Hovden

Gunnar Nygren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (1-2): 26-30.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mats Lindqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Becoming a journalist. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2016. 73-91.

What is the role of journalism education in the socialisation of future journalists into the profession? This question is discussed in a comparative analysis of two large surveys among journalism students and journalists in Sweden, Poland and Russia in 2011–2012. In the analysis, attitudes towards professional values and integrity are compared between students and professionals. The results show clear differences: Journalists show more professional detachment and less activist ideals than do students. Journalists are also more critical towards development in the quality of journalism and press freedom compared to students. One conclusion is that important parts of socialisation into the profession are still taking place in the newsrooms. There are also important differences between the three countries in terms of traits that are transferred to the students from journalistic cultures in the three countries. An example of this includes the borders of the profession in relation to PR and commercial pressure that are weaker in Poland and Russia compared to in Sweden. The ideals of watchdog journalism are weaker among both students and professionals in Russia compared with other countries.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gunnar Nygren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Becoming a Journalist. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2016. 11-23.

There is a “Nordic model” of journalism education. This is partly due to great similarities in the Nordic countries and their history, which has led to similar political and media systems, systems of professional journalism and education. But it is also a result of the extensive dissemination of ideas across borders due to a tradition of close collaboration and close social ties among the Nordic journalism educators.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jan Fredrik Hovden

Gunnar Nygren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Studies of Transition States and Societies 2016, 8 (3): 45-59.

Recent studies on Eastern European migration argue that moving for self-development reasons is becoming increasingly common among this group. Furthermore, it is suggested that migration from the East is becoming individualised and less dependent on social surroundings. Nevertheless, most such results rely on interviews conducted among certain social groups, such as the young and highly skilled. Hence, the comparison between different social groups and their motivations is rarely provided and, therefore, the claims about increased individualisation might be premature. This article uses the Estonian Household Module Survey, including responses from 620 Estonians intending to migrate, to evaluate if migration flows are indeed becoming more individualised and less dependent on social surroundings. Using cluster analysis, three different groups - self-development, economic and life quality migrants - are formed, which are then tested using regression analysis to check for the influence of socio-demographic variables. The article concludes that socio-demographic variables such as gender, age, ethnicity, family status and socio-economic status are still relevant for migration intentions. Indeed, a new group of Eastern European migrants, mainly oriented towards self-development, is emerging; however, it is small and consists mostly of young, Estonian-speaking females. The results complicate the notions of free mobility and liquid migration from Eastern Europe and illustrate that there is a need to pay attention to the increasing group differences in these societies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maarja Saar

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

неприкосновенный запас 2016, 105 (1): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yulia Gradskova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Disputed Memory. Boston : Walter de Gruyter, 2016. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Historical Studies

Amsterdam : Amsterdam University Press, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jonas Lindblom

Kerstin Jacobsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 2016, 3 : 89-103.

Postcolonial theory has recently come under critique as an interpretative scheme applied to Eastern Europe and particularly Ukraine. However, a closer look suggests that the critique applies only to some aspects of the approach, such as a focus on power relations and representations, while the key question should be rephrased as whether the Ukrainian subject was constituted as a colonial subject. A range of empirical material from 1920s Ukrainian discourses, both Soviet and émigré, is analyzed to shed light on how Ukrainians constructed their subjectivity as “a site of disorder” (Dipesh Chakrabarty), splitting themselves into uncultured peasant masses to be modernized and erased as a voiceless subaltern subject, on the one hand, and modernizing elites, on the other. This split can be understood as an epitome of the colonial condition.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Historical Studies

Europe-Asia Studies 2016, 68 (8): 1455-1456.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Olena Podolian

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Europe-Asia Studies 2016, 68 (8): 1457-1458.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Mental Mapping and Eastern Europe. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. 5-10.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Norbert Götz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Rim Economies 2016, 4 : 49-49.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Larry Wolff


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: A European Youth Revolt. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 97-111.

This chapter examines the development and role of the anarchistmovement in Sweden during the 1980s. In relation to many otherparts of Northern Europe – which had seen an upsurge in radicalleft-libertarian activism, squatting and urban unrest at the turn ofthe 1980s – such social movements and confrontations remained amarginal phenomenon in Sweden, at least until the end of the decade.However, by the late 1980s a new generation of younger activists,often with roots in the anarchist milieu, formed the basis for a radicalsquatter and autonomist movement, which proved very similar to themovements that had developed throughout Europe almost a decadeearlier.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jan Jämte

Adrienne Sörbom

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Actas del V Congreso Internacional de Arqueología Subacuática (IKUWA V), Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Underwater Archaeology A heritage for mankind Cartagena, October 15th-18th, 2014. Cartagena : Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte.

During the 16th century the naval ships were developed with increased size and a larger quantity of guns. When the Swedish ship Mars exploded and sank during action in 1564, she was one of the largest ships in the world. In 2011 the wreck was relocated outside the island of Öland in the Baltic Sea. Thanks to the favorable conditions about two thirds of the hull are preserved which includes the stern with the large stern castle. The site thus offers a unique opportunity to study a state of the art warship from this period. The site has been surveyed during three seasons. This paper is based on these initial surveys and aims to present the kind of insights regarding 16th century naval architecture that Mars has revealed so far.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Niklas Eriksson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

MARIS

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archaeology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds In-house edition 2016, : 47-48.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Florence Fröhlig

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Conference proceeding Murman and Russian Arctic: history, present and future. Murmansk : .

The paper summarizes the results of the study of Scandinavian and Finnish settlements on the Kola Peninsula supported by the Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies and Södertörn University as a part of the research project “Soviet Nordic Minorities and Ethnic Cleansing on the Kola Peninsula” led by Associate Professor Andrej Kotljarchuk. The focus of this article is on the representation of Kola-Nordic history as well as on the Nordic sites of memory in today’s Russia

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Andrej Kotljarchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Problemy i tendentsii razvitiya sotsiokulturnogo prostranstva Rossii. Bryansk : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Andrej Kotljarchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Nordic and Baltic Studies Review 2016, 1 : 422-427.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Andrej Kotljarchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Disputed Memories. Berlin-Boston : Walter de Gruyter, 2016. 149-176.

Thousands of Soviet Roma were killed in 1941–1944 by Nazi Einsatzgruppen andlocal collaborators. They were almost never deported to extermination camps,but instead their bodies were left at the scenes where these crimes were committed.In the protocols of the Soviet Extraordinary Commission for Investigation ofWar Crimes, the Roma were often counted as murdered civil citizens, withoutspecifying their ethnicity. Despite the existence of a small number of accountsidentifying the victims of these murders as Romani, the Roma part of the Holocausthistory is still little known in post-Soviet space.In 1976 an official memorial at Babi Yar was erected in Kyiv on the locationof the largest massacre during WWII of Eastern European Jews and Roma. However,the Soviet leadership discouraged placing any emphasis on ethnic aspectsof this tragedy. The Nazi policy of extermination of Roma was neglected; the warwas depicted as a tragedy for all Soviet peoples.The discussion of the Romani identity cannot be isolated from the memoryof the genocide during WWII, which makes the struggle over the past a reflexivelandmark that organizes the politics of commemoration.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Andrej Kotljarchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Journalism Studies 2016, : 1-20.

War reporting has mostly been analyzed as a struggle between political and military control over information and journalistic professionalism. An analysis of reporting in mainstream media from the conflict in eastern Ukraine in 2014 shows that many other aspects must also be considered. In a comparative study, mainstream media coverage in four countries, Ukraine, Russia, Poland, and Sweden, was analyzed and interviews were held with journalists in the media included in the content analysis. Findings revealed significant variations in the framing of the conflict, portrayal of actors involved, and word choice across national settings. Interviews with journalists also highlighted crucial differences in approaches and perceptions. Results show that the specific journalistic culture in each country, self-censorship, and the degree of activist approach among journalists similarly play an important role in war reporting. Researchers from all four countries participated in the project.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

M. Glowacki

Gunnar NygrenJöran Hök

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Lanham : Lexington Books, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mikhail Suslov

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Apparatus 2016, 2-3 : -.

In his Theresienstadt 1941/1945, Hans Günther Adler describes episodes of film making in Theresienstadt giving most attention to the history of the production of the 1944 film. He sums up the episode calling its purpose and organisation by the SS "the gruesome carnival". Interesting enough, while giving a whole chapter in the book to a description of Theresienstadt's cultural life, Adler never mentions the film among other examples of cultural expression but inserts its description into Theresienstadt's administrative chronicle. The film receives a place for itself within the context of the bureaucratic transformations of Theresienstadt from a closed camp into a "ghetto" and finally into a purely decorative "Jewish settlement". This latter transformation Adler describes as part of the cynical campaign of "Verschönerung" of Theresienstadt, an attempt of the SS and the administration to make it presentable to international observers. Adler describes the cruel film carneval as the campaign's piece de resistance and thus resolutely excludes the film from the domain of cultural phenomena as if rejecting any possibility for its redemption. Instead, he inscribes the project into the administrative logic of extermination, filmmaking becoming an additional – inventive in its cruelty and effective – technique of moral extermination in the world of "der verwaltete Mensch". In this article, I emphasize Adler's view of the moving image as a predominantly administrative means, and not a medium of cultural expression. This view becomes quite challenging and complex if Adler's witness account of the film project in Theresienstadt is read together with his reflection on mechanically reproducible, and especially moving, images in Adler's fiction. I will focus on Adler's treatment of the image and image technology in his novels Panorama and Eine Reise / The Journey, with a special attention to the way he considers the relation between the apparatus, memory, and witnessing.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Фэнни Татарстан 2016, 3 : 88-104.

В настоящей статье мы рассмотрели характер связей петербургского ахуна А. Баязитова в среде петербургских литераторов и ученых. Одной из фигур, с которой некоторые авторы вслед за поэтом и публицистом В.Л. Величко связывают имя Баязитова, был философ В.С. Соловьев. Мы попытались выяснить характер отношений между мусульманским богословом и христианским мыслителем.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Renat Bekkin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Historical Aquaculture in Northern Europe. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. 139-156.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Stanislaw Cios

Ingvar Svanberg

Madeleine Bonow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Historical Aquaculture in Northern Europe. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. 89-119.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ingvar Svanberg

Madeleine Bonow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016.

How were fishponds introduced, farmed and spread in Scandinavia and the Baltic Region in early modern times? What was their economic, social and religious importance? Which fish species were significant and why?This book uncovers a long, now broken, tradition that barely left traces in the written record or physical environment. Its broad and multidisciplinary scope highlights the situation from medieval times until the late nineteenth century. Besides Scandinavia and the Baltic States, insights from England are also introduced.Several socio-cultural domains have been identified: late medieval monastic fishponds; late medieval aristocratic fishponds associated with castles and manors; seventeenth and eighteenth century ponds rectory ponds as well as urban ponds from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth century.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Håkan Olsén

Ingvar Svanberg

Madeleine Bonow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Slavic Review 2016, 75 (3): 787-788.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Waffen-SS. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2016. -.

Book abstract: This is the first systematic pan-European study of the hundreds of thousands of non-Germans who fought ― either voluntarily or under different kinds of pressures ― for the Waffen-SS (or auxiliary police formations operating in the occupied East). Building on the findings of regional studies by other scholars ― many of them included in this volume ― The Waffen-SS aims to arrive at a fuller picture of those non-German citizens (from Eastern as well as Western Europe) who served under the SS flag. Where did the non-Germans in the SS come from (socially, geographically, and culturally)? What motivated them? What do we know about the practicalities of international collaboration in war and genocide, in terms of everyday life, language, and ideological training? Did a common transnational identity emerge as a result of shared ideological convictions or experiences of extreme violence? In order to address these questions (and others), The Waffen-SS adopts an approach that does justice to the complexity of the subject, adding a more nuanced, empirically sound understanding of collaboration in Europe during World War II, while also seeking to push the methodological boundaries of the historiographical genre of perpetrator studies by adopting a transnational approach.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Madeleine HurdSteffen Werther

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Stockholm : BONUS, 2016. ( ; )

This report makes a case for examining the role of integration and its links to howsustainable development is variably expressed in different marine spatial planning (MSP)contexts. The aim of the report is to refine an analytical approach to examine integrationin MSP in the Baltic Sea through consideration of preliminary empirical results from abroad range of case studies. MSP is conceptualised here as a governance platform forimproving processes to enable political decision-making with the aim to achievesustainable development of marine space. Integration is universally espoused as ameans to address a variety of challenges closely related to MSP’s sustainabledevelopment ambitions, such as supporting inter-sectoral decision-making, stakeholderengagement and cross-border interaction, but its role, value and implementation in MSPhas not been examined in any empirical detail. Although increased integration may wellhave positive effects on MSP processes and outcomes, in some instances, the contrarymight also be the case. With these thoughts in mind, this report argues that we need toanalyse integration as a multidimensional concept in MSP processes and outcomes.Based on understandings of integration derived from MSP experience and concepts in thebroader social science literature, an analytical framework is developed to examine MSPpractice in the Baltic Sea. Integration is conceptualised as includingtransboundary/cross-border, policy/sectoral, stakeholder and knowledge dimensions.Despite common requirements under the European Union MSP Directive and policies,national jurisdictions are likely to adopt MSP differently, which has implications for therole integration is likely to play in national and transnational MSP practice. Drawing onempirical data derived from national MSP studies, stakeholder dialogue forums andpreliminary interviews with stakeholders the analytical framework is applied to examinehow particular integration challenges play out in both national and transnational marinespace across the Baltic Sea Region. The analytical framework is then used to structurean examination of several case studies from different parts of the Baltic Sea Region.Based on consideration of the empirical work and an analyses of previous experiences inscience and practice we then propose some revisions to the initial analytical frameworkpresented earlier. The revised analytical framework, while capturing the integrationdimensions mentioned earlier, also includes consideration of the following aspects ofintegration: how ‘balance’ between sustainable development dimensions is exercised;the character of cross-boundary interactions; and temporal dynamics. Instead of aconclusion, short think-pieces are presented to capture the main insights of the report,which could be used to aid the examination of integration in MSP in other MSP contexts,beyond the Baltic Sea.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kira Gee

Björn HasslerFred SaundersIgne StalmokaiteMichael Gilek

Paula Lenninger

Ralph Tafon

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: En introduktion till genusvetenskapliga begrepp. Göteborg : Nationella sekretariatet för genusforskning, 2016. 77-81.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ulla Manns

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geopolitics 2016, 2 (3): 623-639.

This paper analyses the contemporary deployment of the Nordic welfare state model as a centrepiece of Nordic competitive identity and strategic communication on the global market of ideas. First, it looks at the interrelated phenomena of global competition, competitive identity and region branding. Second, it studies the interplay between Nordic transnational public diplomacy and national public diplomacy of individual Nordic countries, in particular Sweden, on the one hand and international media outlets’ reporting on the Nordic countries on the other. In analysing this cross-fertilizing genre, the paper identifies how the welfare state is being repackaged for export along with a set of “progressive values” which are coded as specifically “Nordic.” The paper discusses (1) the interaction between outer images and inner visions; (2) the place and significance of the Nordic model, progressive values and the welfare state in today’s Nordic branding; and (3) the possible function of outward competitive identity as a kind of “compensatory imagination” directed inward as well as outward.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Hjärnstrom 2016, 123-124 : 44-50.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Tor Lindstrand

Håkan Nilsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Art History


Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Journal of Communication 2016, 10 : 5252-5269.

A criticism raised about mediatization research is that although the concept of mediatization presupposes a long-term temporal perspective, there are few projects that have studied the process methodologically over time. This article argues that a generational approach can serve as one suggested analytical solution to the problem of studying long-term social, cultural, and societal change. The article describes a recently finished project on media generations in Sweden and Estonia and discusses overcoming the problem of conducting research on mediatization as a long-term process. Through intergenerational and cross-cultural analysis, the article shows how media memories from childhood and the formative years of youth can reveal specific traits in the historical process and how the role of the media has changed over time in the minds of different generations. The article focuses on four generations that had their formative years during significant historical moments in the late 20th century; these formative moments were marked by specificities both in the respective national media landscapes and in the vast historical and geopolitical differences between the two countries.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Media and the Ukraine Crises. New York : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2016. 3-18.

Scholarly attention regarding the conflict between Russia and Ukraine has mainly concentrated on so-called Russian propaganda, directed both towards Russian-speaking populations and the international public, but less attention has been paid to the management of information from Ukraine. In this chapter is proposed that the conflict between Ukraine and Russia has engaged an entirely new set of actors engaged in the management of information, most notably from PR and nation branding activities, as well as journalists, oligarchs and various individuals with an interest in Ukraine’s international image. These new actors bring with them competences, ideologies and practices from their field of origin which impact on the practice and expressive character of information warfare. In this chapter we analyse three domains of communication used by Ukraine to address external audiences; the Ukraine Crisis Media Centre (UCMC), the English language news channel Ukraine Today and the fact checking website StopFake. With a focus on both individuals as well as the institutions they represent, this chapter explores the way in which actors in Ukraine have attempted to shape the content of the messages communicated.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Göran Bolin

Paul Jordan

Per Ståhlberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

PeerJ 2016, 4 : -.

Human-derived environmental pollutants and nutrients that reach the aquatic environment through sewage effluents, agricultural and industrial processes are constantly contributing to environmental changes that serve as drivers for adaptive responses and evolutionary changes in many taxa. In this study, we examined how two types of point sources of aquatic environmental pollution, harbors and sewage treatment plants, affect gene diversity and genetic differentiation in the blue mussel in the Baltic Sea area and off the Swedish west coast (Skagerrak). Reference sites (REF) were geographically paired with sites from sewage treatments plant (STP) and harbors (HAR) with a nested sampling scheme, and genetic differentiation was evaluated using a high-resolution marker amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). This study showed that genetic composition in the Baltic Sea blue mussel was associated with exposure to sewage treatment plant effluents. In addition, mussel populations from harbors were genetically divergent, in contrast to the sewage treatment plant populations, suggesting that there is an effect of pollution from harbors but that the direction is divergent and site specific, while the pollution effect from sewage treatment plants on the genetic composition of blue mussel populations acts in the same direction in the investigated sites.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Emma E Lind

Josefine Larsson

Mikael LönnMats Grahn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: De intellektuellas förräderi?. Lund : Arkiv förlag & tidskrift, 2016. 95-120.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Polska jako peryferie. Warsaw : Wydawnictwo Naukowe SCHOLAR, 2016. 254-267.

The chapter analyses changes in the perception of Poland and Poles in the Danish press after 2009. The authors investigate three major discursive fields of narrative framing, such as freedom, progress and modernity and the field of image-building. In the conclusion a question is posed about the sustainability of the observed changes in the perception.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Dominika Bartnik-Swiatek

Kazimierz Musial

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Russian Review 2016, 75 (4): 559-561.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

-

European Urban and Regional Studies 2016, 23 (4): 697-715.

This paper revisits the geographical legacy of socialism in the urban areas of the former Soviet Union. Building on research on housing and socio-spatial differentiation under and after socialism, this will be achieved by examining an important component in the spatial differentiation of the city, namely neighbourhood reputation. The analysis is based on survey data (n = 1515) from the city of Ust’-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan; a combination of descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression are deployed in order to shed light on the factors that are associated with the reputation of the neighbourhoods in which people reside. The results show that the Soviet system manufactured its own brand of socio-spatial distinction, which reflected the priority hierarchies built in the socialist planned economy. Education, age and, most importantly, area of employment appear to have been ‘rewarded’ with prestigiously located housing.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michael Gentile


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

American Journal of Science 2016, 316 (8): 713-745.

The modern Baltic Sea is the world's largest anthropogenically forced anoxic basin. Using integrated geochemical records collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 347 from the deepest and one of the most reducing sub-basins in the Baltic Sea, Landsort Deep, we explore the degree and frequency of natural anoxia through the Baltic Holocene. A marked decrease in carbon-to-sulfur ratios (C/S) from the cores indicate the transition from the Baltic Ice Lake to the current brackish sea, which occurred about 8.5 kyrs B.P. Following this, laminations throughout sediments recording brackish deposition suggest sustained anoxia or extreme low oxygen, while high molybdenum (Mo) concentrations of >100 ppm and iron (Fe) geochemistry suggest water column sulfide accumulation, or euxinia, that persisted beyond seasonal timescales during deposition of two distinct sapropel units. Sedimentary Mo isotope values range from +1.11 to -0.50 permil, which are distinctly fractionated from modern Baltic seawater (+2.26 to -2.67 parts per thousand) and thus indicate that each of the sapropels experienced only weak and/or oscillatory euxinia-in contrast to the more stable euxinic conditions of more restricted basins. A shift in delta Mo-98 starting above the lower sapropel to a distinctly more negative range suggests particularly weak and oscillatory euxinia, with an enhanced contribution of manganese (Mn) redox cycling to Mo deposition relative to the lower portion of the profile. This conclusion is supported by extreme sedimentary Mn enrichments of up to 15 weight percent. We interpret the combined data to indicate episodic but major Baltic inflow events of saline and oxygenated North Sea water into the anoxic Landsort Deep that limited the concentrations and residence time of water column sulfide and caused episodic oxide deposition. Considering the temporal overlap between the most reducing conditions and periods of redox instability, we hypothesize that major Baltic inflows, as is observed today, lead to short-term instability while simultaneously supporting longer-term Baltic anoxia by strengthening the halocline. Ultimately, our results indicate that periods more reducing than the modern Baltic Sea have occurred naturally over the Holocene, but the characteristic dynamic saline inputs have historically prevented the relatively more widespread and stable anoxia observed in other classic restricted basins and will likely continue to do so.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Dalton S. Hardisty

Thomas Andrén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Patterns of Prejudice 2016, 50 (4-5): 420-444.

Heinrich Himmler created the Waffen-SS in part as a multinational force, willing to fight for a New Europe based on Germanic blood. After the war, many international Waffen-SS units formed veterans' associations (VAs). Like other VAs, these provided veterans with the chance to engage in ‘memory work’ and to keep alive a sense of comradeship and of valiant sacrifice, as well as an emotional commitment to the fallen. Waffen-SS veterans were, however, alone in celebrating their ‘sacrifices’. Others shunned them for their participation in atrocities. To defend themselves, they developed a counter-hegemonic Second World War narrative that presented the Waffen-SS as uniquely heroic ‘European’ volunteers' against Bolshevism. This counter-narrative, however, only gained resonance with the fall of the Berlin Wall. After 1989, in fact, veterans could seek out and establish sites of public commemoration, not in Western but in Eastern Europe. Hurd and Werther use veterans' journals and books to explore the redeployment of SS ideology in a revisionist version of history. They examine the resurrection of a mass Waffen-SS graveyard in East Ukraine as a telling case history, discussing, not least, the implications of a ‘reconciliation’ of the former German soldiers with both Ukrainian villagers and Red Army veterans. Finally, they explore the significance of the veterans' ‘European’ counter-history for a younger generation of neo-Nazis.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Madeleine HurdSteffen Werther

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Miscellanea Anthropologica et Sociologica 2016, 17 (1): 53-69.

Radical social movements are more and more often the subject of academic inquiry, where their agenda, identity-building processes and repertoires of action are examined vis a vis the dominant discursive opportunity structures. The case study presented in this articleis the squatting movement in Poland. We interpret this movement, its actions and in particular alliance-building strategies, through the perspective of radical flanks of broader urban social movements environment.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika PolanskaGrzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (1-2): 68-79.

This paper explores the scope, causes, flourishing, and decline of squatting in Lithuanian society during the period of 1990-2002. Drawing on 16 in-depth interviews conducted with squatters in Vilnius, newspaper articles and legal documents, this paper shows that squatters made contributions to the city with their cultural capital, creating local subcultures and making the urban space more attractive. Squatters promoted an alternative way of life, contributed to the preservation of the city and fostered counter-cultural activities. They offered spaces for performances, exhibits, and concerts. These activities are still present up to this day in the Užupis neighborhood that hosted the most long-lived squat, which in turn was transformed into Art Incubator.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jolanta Aidukaite


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (1-2): 46-56.

Two Polish cities, Warsaw and Poznań, are studied in the article to examine how external structures are handled and used by squatters in these two settings. The aim is to analyze opportunity structures that condition the emergence and development of squatting and how squatters respond to and utilize these opportunities. Our ambition is to understand why squatting has developed differently in the two cities by emphasizing the duration and cohesion of the squatting scene as pivotal for the different trajectories of squatting. It is argued in the article that the durability of the squatting environment abates tendencies to open the squatting scene to external coalitions and establish more institutionalized forms of political struggle.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika PolanskaGrzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (3): 37-48.

This paper deals with the dilemmas scholars can run into when they encounter the conflict between political activists and what can be proven by evidence. The disputewith historians revolves around what the anthropologist Michel-Rolph Trouillot terms “Silencing the past”. This is certainly true in the case of the Roma and genocide.What complicates the case is that a long-standing memory is part of a still ongoing political activist campaign to build a recognized memory for all of Europe’s Roma.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (3): 55-67.

This article engages with political region building by examining the diverging conceptions of the Baltic Sea region since the 1970s. Itmaps the fuzzy geography arising from the enmeshment of territory with a multitude of frameworks for regional action. After 1989, the region became the object of interregional and neighborhood policies established by the European Union, with shifting territorial delimitations according to various internal and geopolitical needs of the day. Drawing on functional, relational, and administrative perspectives, it is shown how spatial definitions surrounding the Baltic Sea region have varied over the past fifty years, revealing those transnational connections that have been valued as worthwhile political investments.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Norbert Götz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Through complex metabolic interactions aquatic microbial life is essential as a driver of ecosystem functions and hence a prerequisite for sustaining plant and animal life in the sea and on Earth. Despite its ecological importance, infor­mation on the complexity of microbial functions and how these are related to environmental conditions is limited. Due to climate change and eutrophication, marine areas facing oxygen depletion are increasing and predicted to continue to do so in the future. Vertically steep oxygen gradients are particularly pronoun­ced in the Baltic Sea. In this thesis, therefore, the ecosystem functions of micro­bial communities were investigated, using metagenomics, to understand how they were distributed along the steep oxygen gradient at the Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, microbial communities from the Lands­ort Deep transect were compared to microbial communities of other marine environments to establish whether the environment at this site resulted in a characteristic community. To reveal what microbial community functions and taxa were active in the anoxic sediment a metatranscriptomic approach was used. Results showed a marked effect of the coupled environmental parameters dissolved oxygen, salinity and temperature on distribution of taxa and par­ti­cularly community functions. Microbial communities showed functional capa­cities consistent with a copiotrophic life-style dependent on organic ma­terial sinking through the water column. The eutrophic condition with high organic load was further reflected in the metatranscriptome of the anoxic sedi­ment com­munity, which indicated active carbon mineralisation through ana­erobic hetero­trophic-autotrophic community synergism. New putative linkages between nitro­gen and- sulphur metabolisms were identified at anoxic depths. Further­more, viable Cyanobacteria in the anoxic sediment was evident from the tran­script analyses as another reflection of marine snow. High abundance and expres­­sion of integron integrases were identified as a charac­teristic feature of the Lands­ort Deep communities, and may provide these communities with a mech­an­ism for short-term-adaptation to environmental change. In summary, this thesis clearly documents what impact eutrophication and oxygen depletion have on microbial community functions. Furthermore, it specifically advances the mechanistic insight into microbial processes in anoxic deep-water sediment at both genomic and transcriptional level. Given the predicted progress of oxygen depletion in marine and brackish environments, this work advances information necessary to estimate effects on marine and in particular brackish ecosystem functions where anoxic conditions prevail.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sara Sjöling

Petter Thureborn


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Inifrån och utifrån. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. 391-419.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Lotte Alsterdal


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Studies in Practical Knowledge


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Inifrån och utifrån. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. 337-366.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Beatriz Lindqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Inifrån och utifrån. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016. 259-281.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Eva Schwarz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Studies in Practical Knowledge


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Sydsvenskan 2016, 7 september : 17-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christoph Andersson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

PeerJ 2016, : -.

Numerous investigations of bacterial communities using sequence analysis of environmental DNA have revealed extensive diversity of microbial taxa in an array of different environmental habitats. Community analysis based solely on DNA, however, does not reveal whether the detected community members are actively contributing to community functioning, or whether they are dormant or remnants of dead cells. This dilemma is of particular concern when analyzing microbial community structure of sites with a high degree of deposited matter, such as marine sediments. For example, the Baltic Sea’s deepest point, the Landsort Deep, consists of anoxic sediments with a large deposition of allochthonous organic matter from the highly stratified 460 m water column above. Our previous metagenomics results indicated the presence of potential obligately aerobic and phototrophic microorganisms. To further elucidate which taxa may contribute to ecosystem function at this site, we here present three different datasets – rDNA amplicons, rDNA reads from a shotgun metagenome and expressed rRNA from a shotgun metatranscriptome. By comparing the three datasets and the ratios between rRNA and rDNA we seek to estimate the protein synthesis potential of the community members in order to provide an indication of what taxa may have cellular activity and metabolic potential. The variation in protein synthesis potential was large, both within and between taxa, in the sediment community. Many typically anaerobic taxa, e.g. from Deltaproteobacteria and Euryarchaeota, showed a high protein synthesis potential, while typical aerobes like Flavobacteria showed a low protein synthesis potential. More surprisingly, some common Baltic Sea surface water bacteria also displayed a high protein synthesis potential, suggesting they have an active role in the anoxic sediment ecosystem at 460 m depth. Both filamentous and unicellular Cyanobacteria exhibited very high protein synthesis potential, which implies a more complex role of these bacteria in carbon cycling in the Baltic Sea than previously suggested. Moreover, Mycobacteria, that were abundant in Landsort Deep sediment metagenome compared with other marine sediment metagenomes, showed protein synthesis potentials consistent with a functional role in the sediment community. Our results provide a new window of insight into the complexities of the microbial community of Landsort Deep with implications for the understanding of other anoxic accumulation sediments.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Yue O. O. Hu

Petter Thureborn

Sara Sjöling

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016.

Här tecknar studenter på den erfarenhetsbaserade förskollärarutbildningen, och forskare som undervisar på samma utbildning, en bild av förskolepedagogens praktiska kunskap. Texterna rör sig mellan ett förtroget inifrånperspektiv och ett teoretiskt utifrånperspektiv. Boken kombinerar på så vis en djupgående undersökning av dagsaktuella frågor som relationen mellan omsorg och lärande, det ökade antalet diagnostiserade barn, resursbrist, lek och utbildningens betydelse, samtidigt som den sätter dessa frågor i relation till vilken förskola, och vilket samhälle, vi vill ha.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Lotte Alsterdal

Maria Pröckl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Studies in Practical Knowledge


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The present investigation develops the notion of sociality based on Emmanuel Levinas’s thought, and proposes an understanding of sociality that resists becoming a common foundation: an un-common sociality which interrupts the reciprocal shared common, and thereby, paradoxically, makes it possible. By engaging in the larger debate on community, this work gives voice to Levinas on the question of community without a common ground, a topic and a debate where he has previously been underestimated. In this way, the aim is to reveal new directions opened up by Levinas’s philosophy in order to think an un-common sociality.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Fredrika Spindler

Ramona Rat

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap 2016, 37 (3): 29-50.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christina Douglas

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2016.

This book examines how a geopolitical grammar works in Nordic and Russian academic feminism and how understandings of a joint feminist “we”, of “Nordicness” and ideas of an “East/West-Divide” shape the formation of gender research fields. In three distinct chapters, each with a different approach to theories, methods and source materials, the book explores the implications of language, translation, and situated knowledges in the development of gender research as a geopolitical area and particular academic space during the mid-1970s until 2005, and considers feminist knowledge production as a field of power relations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marianne Liljeström

Ulrika DahlUlla Manns

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

The presentation discusses how different models of learning religion promote respect for the right to freedom of religion or belief. Three different models of learning about religion are offered in Estonian schools: there are schools with no Religious Education, others have inclusive Religious Education, and there are also religiously-oriented schools with a confessional approach to teaching religion. The article draws on data of the research done in the framework of REDCo project (the main project 2006-2009, replicative study in 2012) and also CARDIPS project (2014). The research projects studied students' views about how they see religion in education. The samples consist of students from different Estonian regions and different experience of learning about religions. Their attitudes to two questions are studied. First, how do students differ in their own attitudes about the need to respect a person who is of a different religion? Second, what do young people think about religious freedoms in the school context? The results of the study call out for discussion of practicing religious freedom in school and practices what may best contribute to a tolerant society.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Olga Schihalejev

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: . : .

Research project "Cultural and religious diversity in primary school" investigates the pupil’s experience of cultural and religious diversity in selected schools from Sweden and Estonia,  structural factors on that experience and the effect of variation in age and family tradition. The countries represent different experiences of cultural and religious diversity.The research applies mixed methods approach. Surveys are carried out with both quantitative and qualitative components. Questionnaire data from pupils (special questionnaires for 3rd, 6th and 9th grade, it is 9-10, 12-13 and 15-16 year old pupils) is supplemented with interviews of a small number of the pupils, their teachers and parents.The paper analyses 3rd graders drawings about what makes them happy. The dawings were part  of the questionnaire about cultural and religious diversity in their everyday experience and at school. The paper answers the question, what values can be found in drawings of boys and girls aged 9-10 from different religious and ethnic backgrounds in two different countries.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Olga Schihalejev

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Media and the Ukraine Crisis. New York : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2016. 107-122.

This chapter explores how the Russian global news broadcaster RT constructed the ongoing crisis in Ukraine during the summer of 2014 in light of theories of new public diplomacy and soft power. The summer of 2014 involved a number of dramatic events relating to the conflict, including the downing of the Malaysian MH17 passenger plane and a series of violent clashes between the Ukrainian army and pro-Russian separatists. During the same period, the US and EU sanctions against Russia were also intensified. This makes the period particularly interesting to examine, as it can give insights into how news from a Russian perspective is articulated during periods marked by political as well as military crises in which Russia plays a central role. Given that convergence and digitalisation have enabled new ways of producing, distributing and consuming news - as well as new ways of implementing politiical communication campaigns and public diplomacy - the analytical focus of this study is on RT’s online news service. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andreas Widholm


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Parliament and Parliamentarism. New York : Berghahn Books, 2016. 97-114.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

U. Jakobsen

Jussi Kurunmäki

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Citizenship Studies 2016, 20 (6-7): 914-931.

The present article concerns Estonian e-government, that is, the digitalization of government and public administration, and the way e-government produces a moral citizen. Although several case studies on e-government exist, they have seldom been sensitive to the local conditions shaping the functions and social meaning of digitalization. E-government involves producing knowledge, and the present article draws on a theoretical perspective that stresses the tight relationship between knowledge and power. In Estonia, the power–knowledge regime is characterized by centralization. Centralization is the condition for a firm national e-government policy, and within this policy, an image of the unique Estonian citizenry is produced. The Estonian moral citizen who emerges out of e-government is de-politicized and detached from a social context, on the one hand, and strongly politicized and attached to a specific ethno-national community, on the other.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrika Björklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Paulina RytkönenMikael LönnborgMarcus Box

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

ENTER forum

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration

Meal Sciences


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Media and Communication 2016, 4 (4): 43-52.

Free software development and the technological practices of hackers have been broadly recognised as fundamental for the formation of political cultures that foster democracy in the digital mediascape. This article explores the role of free software in the practices of digital artists, animators and technicians who work in various roles for the contempo-rary digital visual media industries. Rather than discussing it as a model of organising work, the study conceives free software as a production tool and shows how it becomes a locus of politics about finding material security in flexible capitalism. This politics is ultimately contradictory in that it extends creative and craft autonomy of digital artists but does not mobilise a critical project. Instead, it nurtures further precarious labour. Empirically, the article draws on eth-nographically collected material from the media practices of digital artists and programmers who engage with two popular free software production tools, Blender and Synfig.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Scandinavian Journal of Psychology 2016, 57 (5): 437-445.

This study examines in detail the psychological variables underlying ideological political orientation, and structure and contents of this orientation, in Sweden and Latvia. Individual political orientation is conceptualized on two dimensions: acceptance vs. rejection of social change and acceptance vs. rejection of inequality. Swedish (N = 320) and Latvian (N = 264) participants completed measures of political orientation, Social Dominance Orientation (SDO), Right Wing Authoritarianism (RWA), self vs. other orientation, tolerance for ambiguity, humanism and normativism, core political values, system justification, as well as moral foundations questionnaire and portrait values questionnaire. The results showed that the relation among the measured variables was similar in both samples. Swedish participants showed stronger endorsement of egalitarian attitudes and social values, whereas we found more self-enhancing and socially conservative values and attitudes among the Latvian participants.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Girts Dimdins

Henry Montgomery

Maria Sandgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Psychology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

BMC Psychology 2016, 4 (1): -.

BACKGROUND: Depression is a major health problem worldwide, especially among women. The condition has been related to a number of factors, such as alcohol consumption, economic situation and, more recently, to social capital. However, there have been relatively few studies about the social capital-depression relationship in Eastern Europe. This paper aims to fill this gap by examining the association between different forms of social capital and self-rated depression in Moscow. Differences between men and women will also be examined, with a special focus on women.METHODS: Data was obtained from the Moscow Health Survey, which was conducted in 2004 with 1190 Muscovites aged 18 years or above. For depression, a single-item self-reported measure was used. Social capital was operationalised through five questions about different forms of social relations. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to estimate the association between social capital and self-rated depression, separately for men and women.RESULTS: More women (48 %) than men (36 %) reported that they had felt depressed during the last year. An association was found between social capital and reported depression only among women. Women who were divorced or widowed or who had little contact with relatives had higher odds of reporting depression than those with more family contact. Women who regularly engaged with people from different age groups outside of their families were also more likely to report depression than those with less regular contact.CONCLUSIONS: Social capital can be a mixed blessing for women. Different forms of social relations can lead to different health outcomes, both positive and negative. Although the family is important for women's mental health in Moscow, extra-familial relations across age groups can be mentally distressing. This suggests that even though social capital can be a valuable resource for mental health, some of its forms can be mentally deleterious to maintain, especially for women. More research is needed on both sides to social capital. A special focus should be placed on bridging social relations among women in order to better understand the complex association between social capital and depression in Russia and elsewhere.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Olga Kislitsyna

Andrew Stickley

Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen

Per CarlsonSara Ferlander

Tanya Jukkala


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Social Work

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Aquaculture Reports 2016, 4 : 66-73.

Many fish are during feeding dependent on both an olfactory and gustatory sense. Olfaction that acts as the distance sense induces arousal, food search behaviour and attraction to the source, followed by examination of food items by the gustatory sense. During buccal handling the fish decide if the feed will be rejected or swallowed. Amino acids are often stimulatory to the gustatory sense and can act as feeding stimulants. There are, however, inter-species differences concerning what kinds of amino acids act as feeding stimulants or deterrents. The species differences are probably dependent on the natural food choice. As feeding stimulating molecules increase feeding and growth, but deterrents have the reverse effect, it is important to know what kind of molecules have either effect. In the present study we record mouth handling time in the omnivorous crucian carp, Carassius carassius, of agar pellets containing water extracts of meal consisting of ordinary food pellets, blue mussels or a commercial carp attractant. These tests were followed by testing with agar pellets with synthetic amino acids, based on the content of the water extracts of the food pellets that was the only feeding stimulant. Neither extracts of mussel meal or of commercial carp attractants had a stimulating effect, i.e. no significant difference in handling time compared to agar pellets with only water. A mixture of five of the major amino acids in the food pellet extract (40 mM alanine, 20 mM glycine, 20 mM arginine, 8 mM serine, 8 mM leucin) gave a significant longer handling time compared to agar pellets with only water. The handling time was also longer for the three amino acids that had the highest concentrations (40 mM Ala, 20 mM Gly, 20 mM Arg) and finally with only alanine (128 mM). Agar pellets with only Ala gave, however, a significant shorter handling time compared to agar pellets with food pellet extract. The mussel meal extract had the same content of free amino acids and their ranking order was the same as in extracts of food pellets, but at much higher concentrations. Based on the free amino acid content, the mussel extract should have stimulated feeding. This indicates that the mussel extract contained compounds that acted as feeding deterrents in omnivorous crucian carp that do not feed on blue mussels in their natural environment. Previous studies have shown that blue mussel extracts act as feeding stimulants in several bottom feeding carnivorous fish. We finally tested betaine (100 mM) but the molecule had no significant stimulating effect that has been observed in some other fish species. © 2016 The Authors

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

T. Lundh

Håkan Olsén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

American Malacological Bulletin 2016, 34 (1): 28-39.

Populations of Mytilus edulis complex were studied from 13 stations located at three areas of the Baltic Sea (the Gulf of Gdańsk, Poland; Tvärminne area, Finland; Trosa Archipelago, Sweden) and the Skagerrak sound (Kristineberg, Sweden). The main purpose of the study was to document the occurrence of intersexuality along longitudinal salinity change using squash and histology for comparative reasons. Intersex was identified in all four geographical areas at an average frequency of 1.8%. Squash technique revealed the highest intersex frequency in the Gulf of Gdańsk (up to 6.25%) whereas histology examination did so in the Kristineberg area (up to 10%). In the Tvärminne area and in the Trosa Archipelago the average frequency of intersex did not exceed 2% regardless of the technique used; this suggests a natural induction of the phenomenon. Statistically significant spatial differences in intersex frequency were confirmed for mussels inhabiting polluted hotspots in the Gulf of Gdańsk and at the west coast of Sweden (Kristineberg). Therefore, for these localities artificial induction of intersexuality as a consequence of adverse environmental threats (pollution, parasite outbreaks) is further suggested. Furthermore, squash technique - being less sensitive in identifying intersex when compared to histology - is not recommended for mussels with severe reproductive impairments making a proper analysis of gonads impossible. Intersexual individuals were also characterized by less developed gonads and lower gonado-somatic index (GSI) than males and females. Significantly lower GSI revealed less energy allocation towards reproduction in populations from the Trosa Archipelago and Tvärminne area in comparison to those from the Gulf of Gdańsk and from Kristineberg.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

M. Dublinowska

Josefine Larsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Politics, Civil Society and Participation. Bremen : edition lumière, 2016. 185-195.

Media production is today heavily computerised, and as a consequence of this, profoundly reliant on software. At the same time software does not represent a neutral artefact - it imposes certain affordances, logics, structures and hierarchies of knowledge onto the media making processes. This chapter explores the ways in which visual media creators negotiate the choices between multiple technological alternatives, and the ways in which these negotiations relate to the degree of creative autonomy experienced by cultural producers in their media practice. Combining perspectives from media studies of work in the cultural industries, and science and technology studies (STS), the paper suggests that choices of technology lead media producers to experience creative autonomy differently, by making them labour either within post-industrial technological frameworks that they do not have ownership or control over, or conversely, allow them greater ownership on technology and possibilities to mould their tools, bringing their practice closer to forms of pre-industrial craft production. Creative autonomy, I suggest, can therefore be negotiated by artists and media creators not only in relation to institutions of employment, or nation state politics, but also through deliberate choices of tools, the digital technical toolset that they select and embed in their practice; an approach largely inspired and practiced by some forms of hacker culture.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Edulearn16 proceedings. Valencia : IATED Academy.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Bartliomiej Walczak

Anders Ivarsson Westerberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

Academy of Public Administration

School of Social Sciences

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Svenskans beskrivning 34. Lund : Språk och litteraturcentrum, Lunds universitet.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ingela TykessonLinda Kahlin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Swedish


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Ukraina och informationskriget. : Myndigheten för samhällsskydd och beredskap (MSB), 2016. 193-221.

I det här kapitlet diskuteras hur kriget i Ukraina och dess politiska konfliktlinjer har gestaltats i nyhetskanalen Russia Today (RT). Till skillnad från övriga medier som ingår i rapporten riktar sig inte RT primärt till en lokal eller nationell publik, och dess spridnings- område är därmed heller inte begränsat till ett givet geografiskt territorium. Istället ingår RT i den allt större grupp av tv-kanaler som riktar sig till en internationell publik och den kan därmed ses som ett uttryck för den pågående globaliseringen av såväl medielandskapet som politiken, kulturen och samhället i stort. Analysen visar bl.a. att RTs digitala nyhetsflöde i liten utsträckning inriktar sig på att klargöra skeenden genom faktiska egna observationer eller genom interaktion med primärkällor ute påfältet. Istället ägnas en mycket stor del åt att referera, förstärka, debattera och kritisera olika typer av externa mediekällor. En viktig slutsats som kan dras utifrån det analyserade materialet är att RT inte primärt inriktar sig på att forma en positiv bild av Ryssland. Störst utrymme ägnas istället åt att identifiera och kritisera brister i västvärldens politiska och mediala kulturer för att på så vis skapa grogrund för kritiska attityder. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andreas Widholm


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Lund : Lunds universitet, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

The concept of postmemory has been advanced to account for some of the ways that the strong cultural and individual memories of trauma survivors impact on members of the next generation: their children. According to Marianne Hirsch (1997, 2012), post-memory generations have a special tie to history, which they “remember” through emotional and imaginative investment in the memories of others, whose stories, photographs, and day-to-day actions impart a strong sense of the life-changing, often life-threatening, circumstances they have lived through.In this paper, I explore the relevance and possible limitations of the concept of postmemory for two auto/biographical works written by women of the Polish diaspora: Losing the Dead (2006) by Lisa Appignanesi and Åka Skridskor I Warszawa (Ice-skating in Warsaw) (2014) by Emilia Degenius. Born about 10 years apart (1946 and 1955), the two writers have some similarities, including Jewish backgrounds, parental and personal experiences of anti-Semitism, and emigration from post-war Poland with subsequent fraught relations to the Polish language. Appignanesi, writing in English, has become a cultural commentator and author with an interest in memory and psychoanalysis. Degenius immigrated alone to Sweden in 1972, where she joined her sister, and she has become a practicing psychoanalyst and author of two autobiographical works in Swedish.The narratives of these women writers of the Polish diaspora straddle genres of autobiography, biography, family history, fiction, and memoir. In each account, the relationship to parental figures is of central importance. They each have double narrative strands, one that reconstructs the childhood past through the excavation of memory, and one that figures the adult narrator’s attempts to understand the past through return journeys to Poland, documentation, and interaction. I examine the texts’ formal and thematic characteristics in relation to postmemory.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liz Kella

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

English


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Sociology of Health and Illness 2016, 38 (7): 1074-1091.

This article examines how discourses on assisted reproductive technologies are locally appropriated, translated or contested in the specific cultural and political contexts of Poland and Sweden. The aim is to investigate how two national patients' organisations, namely the Polish association Nasz Bocian and the Swedish organisation Barnlängtan, articulate rights claims in the context of reproductive technologies. To this end, we investigate how these organisations utilise specific context-dependent and affectively laden political vocabularies in order to mobilise politically, and discuss how each of these two groups gives rise to a different set of politicised reproductive identities. In order to trace which political vocabularies the respective organisations utilise to mobilise their respective rights claims, we draw primarily on political discourse theory and concepts of political grammars and empty signifiers. Lastly, we discuss which political reproductive identities emerge as a result of these different versions of political mobilisation around assisted reproductive technologies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elzbieta KorolczukJenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology

Gender Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Historical Studies

This dissertation investigates the way that feminist resistance is expressed in two Swedish and two German so-called New Woman novels from the turn of the twentieth century: Elin Wägner’s Pennskaftet (1910, Penwoman), Gabriele Reuter’s Aus guter Familie (1895, From a Good Family), Hilma Angered-Strandberg’s Lydia Vik (1904), and Grete Meisel-Hess’s Die Intellektuellen (1911).The theoretical apparatus is comprised by the work of Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Jacques Lacan, and Jessica Benjamin. By introducing a psychoanalytic and feminist perspective, this dissertation seeks to develop the possibilities for agency and resistance within the framework of Foucault’s theories. It investigates four textual and contextually grounded strategies of resistance that are prominent in these novels: individuality, openness, desire, and eugenics.This study demonstrates how Gabriele Reuter, Grete Meisel-Hess, and  Hilma Angered-Strandberg, inspired by the ideas of Friedrich Nietzsche and Ellen Key, depict feminine individuality in relation to a scientific and philosophical discourse that specifically denied women individuality. The authors anchor individuality in a corporality that was similarly denied to women by a bourgeois and dogmatic Christian discourse.Openness and wit function as resistance strategies in Elin Wägner’s Pennskaftet. Humorous rejoinders and narrative comments can disarm a conservative. An open attitude towards the emancipation project could also help to resolve the conflicts between different feminist positions and between different women.Desire functions as an important resistance strategy in each of the novels examined. It is variously represented as a vital instinct, a desire for knowledge, and a sexual desire, as in Gabriele Reuter’s Aus guter Familie – or as a desire for suffrage, as in Pennskaftet, or for maternity legislation, as in Grete Meisel-Hess’s Die Intellektuellen. By formulating a notion of feminine desire, turn-of-the-century feminists were able both to seize control of sexuality from the church and to wrest morality from the grasp of the bourgeoisie. These resistance strategies could also have a biopolitical character: in Grete Meisel-Hess’s Die Intellektuellen, woman is placed at the service of humanity on eugenicist grounds, and her good qualities are seen as capable of promoting humanity’s progress.This dissertation shows that in these novels desire at the individual level serves to reinforce feminine subjectivity. Love is seen as associated with an intensified sense of life and as a precondition of creativity. At the social level, desire also functions as the basis for a feeling of solidarity among women that instils in them courage and an urge to persevere in the suffrage struggle, this latter a highly protracted process. In this way desire acquires political potential.A framing chapter on context provides the intellectual and philosophical backgrounds of the various strategies of resistance. It is followed by four analytical chapters, each of which addresses one novel.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Claudia Lindén

Cecilia Annell

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Comparative Literature


Research area for doctoral studies

-

The broad aim of this thesis is twofold: firstly, I contextualise the Maausk movement and its practitioners’ understandings in relation to history and the surrounding society; secondly, I analyse the affective and embodied experiences of being a Maausk practitioner from a phenomenological perspective.The thesis focuses on the formation and practice of Maausk, which is perceived to be deeply tied to the society and history where it exists. Relatedly, this study examines how Maausk identity formation and practices have been influenced by the Soviet legacy, romantic nationalism and Estonia’s current economic and political situation.In order to analyse the Maausk experiences and narratives, this study draws from various phenomenologically oriented theories of affect, embodiment and emotion, as well as cultural theories of place, identity, tradition and authenticity. I have used economic anthropology and globalisation theories as well as historical studies of Estonia’s Soviet past to contextualise the Maausk movement. Further, to place Maausk in the European religious landscape, this study refers to native faith and Neo-pagan studies.Through sensory ethnography, this study draws on the affective and emotional aspects of the research material to analyse how the complexity of emotional experiences of being a Maausk practitioner produces Maausk meanings and values. The study also examines the role and function of the body and emotions during the process of embodying the Maausk practices, both techniques and meanings of the practices.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Maria Zackariasson

Jenni Rinne


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (1-2): 107-108.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (1-2): 116-116.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Utopian studies 2016, 27 (1): 53-76.

This essay examines the Etnogenez series of science fiction and fantasy novels. Launched in 2009 by the media producer, "political technologist," and Kremlin insider Konstantin Rykov, Etnogenez has enjoyed truly phenomenal success, developing into one of the most ambitious publishing projects of the post-Soviet period. At present it numbers more than fifty works, which circulate in millions of copies and additionally are broadly disseminated on the Internet and as e-books, audiobooks, and podcasts. There are Etnogenez fan clubs, computer games, and dozens of Internet discussion groups. Although the novels in the series differ widely in their plots and subjects, and are written in a variety of different science fiction genres, all of them are loosely inspired by the work of the historian and geographer Lev Nikolaevich Gumilev, in particular his theories of ethnogenesis (from which the project takes its name), passionarnost', and Eurasianism. The essay explores the powerful resonances between the Etnogenez project, the Gumilevian legacy, and the leading political and social narratives of Putin's Russia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

-

The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 2016, 20 (5): 574-581.

SETTING: Previous studies in many countries have shown that mortality due to tuberculosis (TB) is higher among people of lower socio-economic status.OBJECTIVE: To assess the magnitude and direction of trends in educational inequalities in TB mortality in 11 European countries.DESIGN: Data on TB mortality between 1980 and 2011 were collected among persons aged 35-79 years. Age-standardised mortality rates by educational level were calculated. Inequalities were estimated using the relative and slope indices of inequality.RESULTS: In the first decade of the twenty-first century, educational inequalities in TB mortality occurred in all countries in this study. The largest absolute inequalities were observed in Lithuania, and the smallest in Denmark. In most countries, relative inequalities have remained stable since the 1980s or 1990s, while absolute inequalities remained stable or went down. In Lithuania and Estonia, however, absolute inequalities increased substantially.CONCLUSION: The reduction in absolute inequalities in TB mortality, as seen in many European countries, is a major achievement; however, inequalities persist and are still a major cause for concern in the twenty-first century. Interventions aimed at preventing TB disease and reducing TB case fatality in lower socio-economic groups should be intensified, especially in the Baltic countries.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

B L Nagavci

Mall Leinsalu

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In 1990, the Institute for Historical and Socio-Political Studies of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party was closed, since the Party was dissolved by the Romanian Revolution. Similar institutions had existed in all countries belonging to the Soviet bloc. This Institute was founded in 1951 under the name of the Party History Institute, and modelled on the Marx-Lenin-Engels Institute in Moscow. Since then, it served the Communist Party in producing thousands of books and journals on the history of the Party and of Romania, following Party orders. Previous research has portrayed the Institute as a loyal executioner of the Party’s will, negating the agency of its history-writers in influencing the duties of the Institute. However, the recent opening of the Institute’s archive has shown that a number of internal and previously obscured dynamics impacted on its activities. This book is dedicated to the study of the Party History Institute, of the history-writers employed there, and of the narratives they produced. By studying the history-writers and their host institution, this study re-contextualizes the historiography produced under Communist rule by analysing the actual conditions under which it was written: the interrelation between dynamics of control and the struggle for resources, power and positions play a fundamental role in this history. This is the first scholarly inquiry about a highly controversial institute that struggled in order to follow the constantly shifting Party narrative canon, while competing formaterial resources with rival Party and academic institutions. The main actors in this study are the history-writers: Party veterans, young propagandists and educated historians, in conflicting networks and groups, struggled in order to gain access to the limited resources and positions provided by the Party, and in order to survive the political changes imposed by the leadership. By doing so they succeed, on many occasions, to influence the activities of the Institute.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Per Bolin

Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

International Journal of Business and Management 2016, 11 (5): 44-56.

AbstractThe objective of this paper is to describe and explain company strategies under uncertainty. The study attempts to examine closer interaction between research on strategic management and internationalization theory. Recent escalation of conflict between Russia and the EU/USA in combination with economic recession increased the level of uncertainty. The article explores how this deterioration is reflected in a strategy of Swedish companies operating in Russia. This study builds on the empirical data from a survey conducted in 2015 among 73 Swedish firms. The findings of the study contribute to knowledge regarding diversity in commitments shown by different companies at one particular point of time under the same circumstances. The study reveals a domination of expansion strategy chosen by Swedish firms during the current escalation of uncertainty in Russia. A growing strategy under uncertainty has seldom been reported and analyzed by scholars. The study demonstrated that uncertainty is not only a threat to companies operating on the market, but can lead to expanding strategies attempting to exploit the opportunities that uncertainty might offer. Appraising the risk concept, the study provides implications for companies’ managers on the importance of a commitment decision to face the deterioration caused by the uncertainty. Empirical data from this study also suggest that uncertainty is handled by companies better than one might expect. The article questions whether companies and managers are really risk-averse in their behaviour.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Olga Golubeva


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

ARKIV. Tidskrift för samhällsanalys 2016, 5 : 15-37.

Termen ”extremism” har blivit vanligare inom både svensk offentlig debatt och myndighetsprosa. I sådana sammanhang är det dock sällan klart exakt vad som avses med denna term. Inte heller inom samhällsvetenskapen är begreppet extre­ mism oomstritt och inom olika forskningsfält används begreppet på olika sätt. Syftet med Adrienne Sörbom och Magnus Wennerhags artikel är att belysa extremismbegrep­ pets uppkomst och förändrade betydelse under moderniteten, samt att diskutera några av de problem som begreppet är behäftat med. Med hjälp av bland annat vetenskaps­ sociologen Thomas F. Gieryns begrepp ”gränsdragningsarbete” (boundary-work) visar Sörbom och Wennerhag hur begreppet extremism används i fältet mellan vetenskap, politik och samhällsdebatt. Författarnas huvudsakliga poäng är att begreppets utgångs­ punkt i en tydligt normativ föreställning om politiska avvikelser gör det mindre använd­ bart i vetenskapliga sammanhang, eftersom det enbart tar dessa avvikelser för givna och inte erbjuder några förklaringar om varför de uppkommer eller vilken roll de spelar i moderna samhällen. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Adrienne SörbomMagnus Wennerhag

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Journal of Business Case Studies (JBCS) 2016, 12 (2): 83-98.

FDI (foreign direct investment) of Swedbank in Ukraine is an example of unsuccessful investment in transition economies. The Case Study is presented in relation with Swedbank’s internationalization strategy and rapidly changing investment environment in transition economies and globally. Learning objectives include helping students to develop analytical skills in order to understand how political, economic, financial and social factors effect internalization strategy through FDI. The Case Study should help students to understand the importance of an appropriate long-term strategy of a firm entering transition economies, understand the investment environment of a foreign country and choose the best course of action for a distressed firm considering alternative scenarios. Lessons learned from the Case Study can be beneficial for students studying international business, but also for future decision-makers that would be acting in complex environments under rapidly changing situations. The author developed the Case from secondary sources: Swedbank’s annual reports and press-releases, information published by multilateral organizations and government agencies, research from investment banking houses and reputable news agencies. This Case is written solely for educational purposes and is not intended to analyze successful or unsuccessful internalization strategy through FDI in transition economies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Olga Golubeva


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Environmental Governance of the Baltic Sea. : Springer, 2016. 149-172.

This chapter analyses the governance structures linked to the marine environment of the Baltic Sea. The purpose is to assess whether current developments of the governance structures have a potential to take into account requirements of an Ecosystem Approach to Management (EAM). We use the concept of reflexive governance to understand key components and weaknesses in contemporary governance modes, as well as to elaborate on possible pathways towards a governance mode more aligned with EAM. The reflexive governance framework highlights three elements: (1) acknowledgement of uncertainty and ambiguity; (2) a holistic approach in terms of scales, sectors and actors; and (3) acknowledgement of path dependency and incremental policy-making. Our analysis is based on a comparative case study approach, including analysis of the governance in five environmental risk areas: chemical pollution, overfishing, eutrophication, invasive alien species and pollution from shipping. The chapter highlights an existing governance mode that is ill-equipped to deal with the complexity of environmental problems in a holistic manner, with systematic attention to uncertainty, plurality of values, ambiguity and limited knowledge, while also pointing at important recent cognitive and institutional developments that can favour pathways towards reflexive governance and consequently EAM.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sam Grönholm

Björn Hassler

Magnus Boström


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Environmental Governance of the Baltic Sea. : Springer, 2016. 205-227.

This chapter focuses on forms of and challenges for risk communication within regional environmental governance, based on an analysis of five environmental risks in the Baltic Sea – marine oil transportation, chemicals, overfishing, eutrophication and alien species. We address questions about how risks are framed and communicated and also analyse the role of communication in the governance process. Our main focus is on risk communication with the public (e.g. existing institutional arrangements and procedures of risk communication), but we also relate this analysis to discussions on communication with a broad range of actors and issues of stakeholder participation and communication. In the study we have identified some examples of relatively well-working risk communication with parts of the organised public in the Baltic Sea region (BSR), such as in fisheries or eutrophication, but also a number of different barriers and obstacles. Our key result from this study is that BSR consists of many national institutions for risk communication, but that there are hardly any centralised institutions for risk communication activities relating to environmental governance in the region. Another key conclusion is that public risk communication in this array of cross-national environmental risks is restricted mainly to (one-way) information. Against this backdrop and from our empirical and theoretical knowledge of risk communication and the role of the public, we finally suggest some ways for improvement.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marion Dreyer

Anna Maria Jönsson

Magnus Boström

Sara Söderström

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Environmental Governance of the Baltic Sea. : Springer, 2016. 229-246.

Governing marine environments is a highly complex and challenging enterprise. This applies particularly to the heavily exploited Baltic Sea for which despite extensive governance arrangements and a substantial scientific knowledge base, it is unlikely that the policy objective of ‘good environmental status’ is reached. Based on a review of governance arrangements linked to five large-scale environmental issues (eutrophication, overfishing, invasive alien species, chemical pollution and oil spills from shipping), this chapter aims to identify pathways and concrete ideas for institutional reform that may improve goal fulfilment. The results show that governance challenges differ substantially between environmental issues, implying a need for case-specific management reforms. For example, coping with extreme uncertainty is a key challenge in the chemical pollution case, whereas it seems more pertinent in the eutrophication case to address the complexity of nutrient pollution sources by adapting objectives and measures amongst sectoral policies to be in line with environmental ones. Furthermore, cross-case comparisons reveal a set of common vital functions (i.e. coordination, integration, interdisciplinarity, precaution, deliberation, communication and adaptability) that are needed in order to facilitate effective and efficient environmental governance in the long term. To promote these functions in Baltic Sea environmental governance, the chapter suggests pathways and institutional reforms aimed at improving multilevel and multisectoral integration, science-policy interactions and stakeholder participation. To further develop these ideas, it is proposed amongst other things that priority is given to setting up an international ‘Baltic Sea Policy Review Mechanism’, formed by cross-body and cross-stakeholder participation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Michael Gilek

Mikael Karlsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Environmental Governance of the Baltic Sea. : Springer, 2016. 97-123.

This study zooms in on public governance in the Baltic Sea region of three generations of notorious hazardous substances, namely, PCBs, PBDEs and PFOS/PFOA. Following regulation, PCB concentrations in the Baltic Sea have decreased substantially although they are still above pre-industrial levels. PBDE levels have also decreased in some places, but they too are well above targeted levels, whereas the situation for PFOS and in particular for PFOA has hardly improved at all. In the case of PCBs, while comprehensive measures took long to implement, initial preventive measures were taken early based on the precautionary principle. This contrasts with the cases of PBDEs, PFOS and PFOA, where the burden of proof on policy-makers has been high and hence caused severe delays in policymaking. There has, however, generally been a positive interplay in all three cases between the EU, which has legislated, and HELCOM, which has taken the role of concept and agenda setting. While environment-oriented policies, such as the Ecosystem Approach to Management under MSFD and BSAP, have grown in importance over time, polluter-oriented chemical legislation has been more important when it comes to final decision-making. Nevertheless, the general response has been reactive rather than proactive, and there is no indication that society responds faster today than in the past, at least not given the fact that awareness, experience and knowledge are greater today than a few decades back. Based on that insight, the article discusses various options for improving governance.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Michael Gilek

Mikael Karlsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Environmental Governance of the Baltic Sea. : Springer, 2016. 1-17.

The Baltic Sea ecosystem is subject to a wide array of societal pressures and associated environmental risks (e.g. eutrophication, oil discharges, chemical pollution, overfishing and invasive alien species). Despite several years of substantial efforts by state and non-state actors, it is still highly unlikely that the regionally agreed environmental objectives of reaching “good environmental status” by 2021 in the HELCOM BSAP (Baltic Sea Action Plan) and by 2020 in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) will be met. This chapter identifies key research topics, as well as presents analytical perspectives for analysing the gap between knowledge and action in Baltic Sea environmental governance. It does so by outlining important trends and key challenges associated with Baltic Sea environmental governance, as well as by summarising the scope and results of individual chapters of this interdisciplinary volume. The analysis reveals the development of increasingly complex governance arrangements and the ongoing implementation of the holistic Ecosystem Approach to Management, as two general trends that together contribute to three key challenges associated with (1) regional and cross - sectoral coordination and collaboration, (2) coping with complexity and uncertainty in science-policy interactions and (3) developing communication and knowledge sharing among stakeholder groups. Furthermore, to facilitate analysis of environmental governance opportunities and obstacles both within and across specific environmental issues, this chapter reviews the scientific literature to pinpoint key research issues and questions linked to the identified governance challenges.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sebastian Linke

Michael Gilek

Mikael Karlsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Environmental Governance of the Baltic Sea. : Springer, 2016. 21-44.

This study investigates if and how present institutional structures and interactions between scientific assessment and environmental management are sufficient for implementing the ecosystem approach to management (EAM) in the case of Baltic Sea eutrophication. Concerning governance structures, a number of institutions and policies focus on issues relating to eutrophication. In many cases, the policies are mutually supportive rather than contradictory, as seen, for example, in the case of the mutually supportive BSAP and MSFD. The opposite is true, however, when it comes to the linkages with some other policy areas, in particular regarding agricultural policy, where the EU CAP subsidises intensive agriculture with at best minor consideration of environmental objectives, thereby undermining EAM. Enhanced policy coherence and stricter policies on concrete measures to combat eutrophication seem well needed in order to reach stated environmental objectives.  When it comes to assessment-management interactions, the science- policy interface has worked well in periods, but the more specific that policies have become, for example, in the BSAP case, the more question marks have been raised about science by affected stakeholders. At present, outright controversies exist, and EAM is far from realised in eutrophication policy in the Baltic Sea region. Besides coping with remaining uncertainties by improving the knowledge on problems and solutions– not least in terms of the socio-economic impacts of eutrophication – it may therefore be valuable to develop venues for improved stakeholder participation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Cecilia Lundberg

Michael Gilek

Mikael Karlsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Baltic Worlds In-house edition 2016, : 5-9.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Linn Rabe

Vasileios Petrogiannis

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geografiska Notiser 2016, LXXIV (1): 55-56.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Movement Ecology 2016, 4 : -.

BACKGROUND: We still have limited knowledge about the underlying genetic mechanisms that enable migrating species of birds to navigate the globe. Here we make an attempt to get insight into the genetic architecture controlling this complex innate behaviour. We contrast the gene expression profiles of two closely related songbird subspecies with divergent migratory phenotypes. In addition to comparing differences in migratory strategy we include a temporal component and contrast patterns between breeding adults and autumn migrating juvenile birds of both subspecies. The two willow warbler subspecies, Phylloscopus trochilus trochilus and P. t. acredula, are remarkably similar both in phenotype and genotype and have a narrow contact zone in central Scandinavia. Here we used a microarray gene chip representing 23,136 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata to identify mRNA level differences in willow warbler brain tissue in relation to subspecies and season.RESULTS: Out of the 22,109 EST probe sets that remained after filtering poorly binding probes, we found 11,898 (51.8 %) probe sets that could be reliably and uniquely matched to a total of 6,758 orthologous zebra finch genes. The two subspecies showed very similar levels of gene expression with less than 0.1 % of the probe sets being significantly differentially expressed. In contrast, 3,045 (13.8 %) probe sets were found to be differently regulated between samples collected from breeding adults and autumn migrating juvenile birds. The genes found to be differentially expressed between seasons appeared to be enriched for functional roles in neuronal firing and neuronal synapse formation.CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that only few genes are differentially expressed between the subspecies. This suggests that the different migration strategies of the subspecies might be governed by few genes, or that the expression patterns of those genes are time-structured or tissue-specific in ways, which our approach fails to uncover. Our findings will be useful in the planning of new experiments designed to unravel the genes involved in the migratory program of birds.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

John Boss

Mats Grahn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

PeerJ 2016, 4 : -.

Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andrea Franzetti

Petter Thureborn

Sara Sjöling

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Aquatic Toxicology 2016, 173 : 19-28.

Citalopram is an antidepressant drug, which acts by inhibiting the re-uptake of serotonin from the synaptic cleft into the pre-synaptic nerve ending. It is one of the most common drugs used in treatment of depression, it is highly lipophilic and frequently found in sewage treatment plant effluents and surface waters around the world. Citalopram and other selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors have, at concentrations that occur in nature, been shown to have behavioural as well as physiological effects on fish and other animals. This study is the result of several different experiments, intended to analyse different aspects of behavioural effects of chronic citalopram exposure in fish. Our model species the three-spine stickleback is common in the entire northern hemisphere and is considered to be a good environmental sentinel species. Female three-spine sticklebacks were exposed to 0, 1.5 and 15μg/l nominal concentrations of citalopram for 21 days and subjected to the novel tank (NT) diving test. In the NT test, the fish exposed to 1.5μg/l, but not the 15μg/l fish made a significantly higher number of transitions to the upper half and stayed there for significantly longer time than the fish exposed to 0μg/l. The 15μg/l group, however, displayed a significantly lower number of freeze bouts and a shorter total freezing time. The test for locomotor activity included in the NT test showed that fish treated with 1.5 and 15μg/l displayed a significantly higher swimming activity than control fish both 5-7 and 15-17min after the start of the experiment. In the next experiment we compared fish exposed to 1.5μg/l and 0.15μg/l to pure water controls with regard to shoaling intensity and found no effect of treatment. In the final experiment the propensity of fish treated with 1.5μg/l to approach an unknown object and aggressive behaviour was investigated using the Novel Object test and a mirror test, respectively. The exposed fish ventured close to the unknown object significantly more often and stayed there for significantly longer time than unexposed fish. The aggression test yielded no statistically significant effects. It is concluded that citalopram changes the behaviour of the three-spine stickleback in a way that is likely to have ecological consequences and that it must not be considered an environmentally safe pharmaceutical.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

S Hallgren

Håkan OlsénInger Porsch-HällströmMartin KellnerTove Porseryd

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

London : Overseas Development Institute, 2016. (HPG Working Paper ; January 2016)

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Discourse Studies 2016, 18 (1): 87-105.

Based on calls to an outsourced call centre in Moldova, where the agents have received training in Swedish, this article deals with some cases when agents are attributed categorical belonging associated with the issue of outsourcing. The aim of the study is to examine how these challenges are handled within interaction. The analysis is implemented by a combination of conversation analysis and membership categorization analysis, primarily through the notion of omnirelevance, used to demonstrate the participants’ orientation to social contexts. A main result is the subtle forms of resistance that agents exhibit when they respond to various category-based compliments, oriented to the location and language skills of the agent. One form of resistance is giving minimal responses and another is to return to the transactional procedure. The calls are part of a corpus of 800 calls. A comparative analysis also includes a call to a centre in Sweden.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ingela TykessonLinda Kahlin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Swedish


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Critical Kinship Studies. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2016. 33-47.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Regulating Competition. Abingdon & New York : Routledge, 2016. 248-267.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mats Larsson

Mikael Lönnborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

ENTER forum

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Chemosphere 2016, 144 : 1597-1604.

Brominated aromatic compounds (BACs) are widely distributed in the marine environment. Some of these compounds are highly toxic, such as certain hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs). In addition to anthropogenic emissions through use of BACs as e.g. flame retardants, BACs are natural products formed by marine organisms such as algae, sponges, and cyanobacteria. Little is known of the transfer of BACs from natural producers and further up in the trophic food chain. In this study it was observed that total sum of methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) and OH-PBDEs increased in concentration from the filamentous red alga Ceramium tenuicorne, via Gammarus sp. and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to perch (Perca fluviatilis). The MeO-PBDEs, which were expected to bioaccumulate, increased in concentration accordingly up to perch, where the levels suddenly dropped dramatically. The opposite pattern was observed for OH-PBDEs, where the concentration exhibited a general trend of decline up the food web, but increased in perch, indicating metabolic demethylation of MeO-PBDEs. Debromination was also indicated to occur when progressing through the food chain resulting in high levels of tetra-brominated MeO-PBDE and OH-PBDE congeners in fish, while some penta- and hexa-brominated congeners were observed to be the dominant products in the alga. As it has been shown that OH-PBDEs are potent disruptors of oxidative phosphorylation and that mixtures of different congener may act synergistically in terms of this toxic mode of action, the high levels of OH-PBDEs detected in perch in this study warrants further investigation into potential effects of these compounds on Baltic wildlife, and monitoring of their levels.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Dennis Lindqvist

Elin Dahlgren

Kari Lehtilä

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Infant and Child Development 2016, 25 (1): 43-63.

The study compares mothers' conversation with their 4-year-old children about two past events in two autonomy-oriented (35 German and 42 Swedish families), one relatedness-oriented (22 Cameroonian Nso families) and one autonomy-relatedness oriented (38 Estonian families) contexts. German mothers were rather similar to Swedish mothers in talking a lot, providing a lot of information and engaging children into conversation, but they differed from Swedish mothers by talking more about social content. Swedish children were more independent conversational partners to their mothers than other children, including German children. Estonian mothers' contribution to conversation was similar to Cameroonian Nso mothers, except that they asked a lot of open-ended questions to engage children in conversations. Estonian children did not differ from Swedish and German children in their contribution to conversations. Compared to Swedish mothers, past event talk of Estonian mothers was characterized by a bigger proportion of talk devoted to social content, but also to the child, mental states and non-social content. It was characteristic of Cameroonian Nso mothers that they focused more on other people and actions, and their conversational dominance was larger. Differences in reminiscing were consistent with different cultural models of self and the type of autonomy – psychological or action – promoted.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pirko Tõugu

Boel De Geer

Tiia Tulviste


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Swedish


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ecological Economics 2016, 130 : 8-15.

Local stakeholder participation in water management is emphasized in the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD). Wetland creation to mitigate nutrient leakage from agriculture is one example where participation of local farmers is needed. In this case study of the Himmerfjärden coastal catchment area, south of Stockholm, Sweden, we assessed both the importance of several demo-graphic factors, and of the main subsidy factors in the present Agri-Environmental Scheme (AES) for their effects on farmers’ willingness to create wetlands on their farms. The farm and farmer characteristics analyzed were age, gender, knowledge of the WFD, education, farm size, land ownership, current measures to reduce nutrient leakage and trust for other actors. The main factors from the AES were defined as five attributes in a discrete choice experiment approach related to the current agri-environmental policy instrument for wetland creation applied in the area. The results showed that approximately 30 % of the farmers were interested in wetland creation at their farms. The most common reason for not wanting to create a wetland was economic cost. Males were significantly more willing than females to create wetlands. Younger farmers were significantly more willing than older. Prior knowledge of the WFD increased willingness almost threefold, and land owners were significantly more willing than leaseholders. The choice experiment showed that higher cost ceiling for subsidies, higher compensation percentage and higher annual subsidies can significantly increase the willingness to create wetlands. However to attract also the remaining 70% of all farmers to join the AES we must look at other options than only using action based AES.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Frida Franzén

Monica HammerPatrik Dinnétz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

International Journal of Social Welfare 2016, 25 (1): 69-77.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Per Carlson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Social Work


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Studia z dziejów anarchizmu (2). Szczecin : Wydawnictwo Naukowe Uniwersytetu Szczecińskiego.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Grzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: A European Youth Revolt?. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. -.

The 1989 pro-democratic transition in Poland was partly influenced by the rapidly growing youth subcultures. Punk rock was one of the most visible of them, providing numerous young people with networking possibilities, fresh ideas and different (than of the dissidents) understanding of freedom. Punk was not only challenging aesthetically, but also contested communist authorities from a different perspective, looking into environmental protection or turning against compulsory military service. The punk ‘no future’ slogan was also very appealing for young people in crisis-driven Poland of 1980s and the flagship punk event in Poland – the Jarocin music festival – became a safe place for many young people. The aim of this chapter is to show how punk rock helped to overthrow communism in Poland through these processes.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Grzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

The International Journal of Cultural Policy 2016, 22 (4): 594-610.

This article examines the transfer of creative industries as a policy idea to Lithuania. Tracing the stages of the transfer and analysing its consequences in the local cultural policy field, this paper argues for the importance of studying cultural policy process. The findings reveal that the process of the international transfer of creative industries mattered, because it generated wider transformations in cultural policy field by having ambiguous effects on local power relations. The policy idea of creative industries opened the cultural policy field to new actors. As a result, competition for scarce state funding increased, but cultural organisations gained access to the European Union structural funds. In all, creative industries as a policy idea significantly transformed Lithuanian state cultural policy, in that it led to a reassessment of both the practices and identities of cultural organisations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Egle Rindzevičiūtė

Jenny Svensson

Klara Tomson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

International journal of cultural studies 2016, 19 (2): 177-192.

With the internet and digital media technology increasingly central to practices around music, this shift is often seen as contributing to a networked music use characterized by individualism. Drawing on a focus group study with young adults in Stockholm and Moscow, this article argues, however, that digital music use today is shaped by discourses of difference, with gender a significant factor both in constructions of the ideal music and technology user, and in terms of musical influence and guidance. Taking into account contemporary research on new media technology, as well as feminist studies of technology and music, the article questions ideas of a neutral user of new music technologies, showing how the gendering of music and media technology can be seen as simultaneously context-bound and cutting across geographies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia JohanssonAnn Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

THE GENESIS OF GENIUS 2015, 5 : 121-124.

Banking system stabilityunderpins the functioning of an economy. A number of micro and macro level factors determine the stability of the system. The Russian banking system is on the edge of financial equilibrium due to poor transparency of financial information, lack of liquidity and declining competition.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Smolander

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Västerviks historia. Västervik : Västerviks Museum, 2015. 11-37.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ingvar Sjöblom

Johan Rönnby

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

MARIS

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archaeology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Militärhistorisk Tidskrift 2015, 2 : 134-138.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Torbjörn Nilsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Aktuellt om historia 2015, 1 : 91-99.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Torbjörn Nilsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2015, VIII (3-4): 123-124.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ukraina Moderna 2015, 22 : 233-236.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

East European Quarterly 2015, 43 (1): 111-128.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Olena Podolian

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Hjärnstorm 2015, 122 : 2-10.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Tor Lindstrand

Håkan Nilsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Art History


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Olga Schihalejev

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Copenhagen : WHO Regional Office for Europe, 2015. ( ; )

This case study aims to provide a comprehensive overview of trends and inequalities in mortality of noncommunicable diseases in Estonia over the first decade of the 2000s. Decomposition of life expectancy by causes and age groups, and calculation of age-standardized rates for total and cause-specific mortality were used to assess differences over time and across social groups. The findings of the analysis showed significant overall reduction in mortality and increasing life expectancy in Estonia during the 2000s. The considerable improvement in mortality was observed in all groups distinguished by gender, ethnicity, educational level or by place of residence resulting in narrowing absolute inequalities, although the relative inequalities by educational level and by place of residence slightly increased. Despite progress, mortality rates remained higher among non-Estonians, the lower educated and residents of Ida-Viru county. Circulatory diseases and external causes of death contributed the most to the overall life expectancy at birth improvement and to the larger mortality decline among non-Estonians, the lower educated and in Ida-Viru county, with the opposite effect seen for infectious diseases.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Taavi Lai

Mall Leinsalu

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Journalism in change. Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015. 97-117.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jöran Hök

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Journalism in change. Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015. 233-257.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elena Johansson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Studier i Pædagogisk Filosofi 2015, 4 (2): 81-93.

Cosmopolitanism is a value-loaded concept that seems to become popular in intervals. The latest cosmopolitan period started after the end of the Cold War and the breakdown of the Soviet Union and concentrated mostly on aspects such as “a new world order”, and often with reference to Kant. It might be questioned if the cosmopolitan period still exists. Here it is suggested that a historical understanding of cosmopolitanism together with experience from later social and political experiences might give a new perspective on the difficulties of creating a better world in a Kantian sense, including cosmopolitan education. Considering its history and taking concern of experience Kant’s cosmopolitanism still is relevant, not least in its broader sense.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Turun Sanomat 2015, 7 maj : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann-Cathrine Jungar

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2015, 12 maj : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann-Cathrine Jungar

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2015, 14 april : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann-Cathrine Jungar

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Journalism in change. Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015. 259-278.

To be a journalist in Poland, Russia and Sweden means - in many ways - to be a part of the same community: the most important ideals are the same, the daily work is performed with similar tools, formats and expressions are similar. On the surface there are many similarities, but still there are important differences when it comes to the conditions for  professionals. The frames in the daily work  describing the boundaries for each journalist are different – commercial and political limitations for what is possible in journalistic practice. There are commercial pressures from owners and advertisers and political influence on media companies and newsrooms on journalists to adapt in their daily work. Additionally, what is more important, these limitations differ between the three countries and among different types of media.These are some of the results presented in previous chapters in this anthology. The point of departure for the project has been the rapid changes in media technology, society (changes in users’ behaviour) in combination with crisis for business models and increasing market influence in the media sector. The question is how these changes influence professional journalistic cultures in different media systems. Poland, Russia and Sweden represent different traditions in journalism, and the position of media in relation to political power and society differs as well. We knew from the beginning that there were differences – but is it also possible to identify similarities between journalistic cultures in the era of globalization of professional cultures (Waisbord, 2013)?The project has researched the changes in journalism from the perspective of representatives of this profession. With a survey to a representative sample of 500 journalists in each country, opinions and experiences were  studied. In 20 in-depth interviews in each country journalists were asked to give more detailed answers going beyond the questions in the survey. All the empirical work was accomplished by national teams in 2012, and the results were analyzed and presented at international and national conferences in 2013-2014 (see Chapter 2).The results of the project have been presented in thematic chapters. In this final conclusion we summarize and present answers for the following research questions: -      How is technological and economic development influencing professional journalistic cultures in the three countries?-      Do the changing practices influence journalists’ perception of routines and values?-      What are the consequences for professional autonomy – in daily work and in relation to other social fields such as politics and the economy?-      Is media development making journalism more similar in spite of differences in traditions and media systems? Is there a homogenization of journalism or is it more correct to label it hybridization?-      Is the status of journalism as a social field changing; is there a de-professionalization as a result of media development?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska

Gunnar Nygren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Journalism in change. Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015. 119-152.

Freedom in  daily work is important for nearly all journalists in the three countries. It is the second most important factor in choosing the place of work, according to the survey. A degree of autonomy is also an important part of self-perception of journalists in their professional roles and closely related to job satisfaction (Weaver and Willnat, 2012:534).But there are also clear differences between journalists in how big this perceived autonomy is in  daily work. There are different kinds of pressure from outside and inside the media company – pressure from lack of time and formats of the media, constraints within the organization, political and commercial pressure. There is also a media development challenging the professional identity of journalists;  journalistic work is undergoing fundamental changes – transitioning from a monologue to more of dialogue with the audience, with new tools and media formats introducing new kinds of expressions. Increasing commercialization and fragmentation of the media landscape are changing the foundations on which journalism rests (Deuze, 2007; Mitchelstein and Boczkowski, 2009; Singer et al., 2011).One may assume that all these changes influence the degree of professional autonomy for journalists. But the direction is not obvious; some changes, like  strong commercialization might put  pressure on the degree of autonomy, but others might work in another direction; for example it is possible that technological development can both increase perceived autonomy, giving journalists more tools and a stronger position, but also limit the autonomy in an increasing demand to produce more and faster.The purpose of this chapter is to study how perceived autonomy in  daily work is related to factors on a different level, from the individual level of journalist, the position of the journalist within the media organization and to the level of media system. This analysis is also related to media development, both technological and commercial factors. From this, perceived professional autonomy is related to different kinds of media systems with various degrees of political and commercial pressure on journalism.This allows one to raise three research questions: RQ1: What are the differences and similarities between the three countries and media systems when it comes to professional autonomy?RQ2: What are the most important factors explaining differences in perceived autonomy on three different levels – the individual, organizational and societal level?RQ3: How are these factors influenced by media development? What is giving stronger or weaker perceived autonomy?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gunnar Nygren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Journalism in change. Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015. 19-40.

The concept of  ongoing professionalization has been a key area in journalism studies for many years (Zelizer, 2004; Schudson, 2003; Waisbord, 2013). Journalism has been described as gaining influence within the media system, mainly in relation to political power and state. With common standards and professional institutions, journalism has grown stronger in modern society. But is this still the case in an emerging interactive network society? Is the development the same in different media systems – is it possible to still have a process of professionalization in some parts of the world, and the reverse process in other parts of the world; a de-professionalization? Is professionalization the same in different media systems?This theoretical introduction gives some background to these questions covered in the project “Journalism in Change”. It gives different perspectives from research in four areas:-  Professions and professional logic, based on sociological research on professions.-  Ideals and standards as described in comparative journalism research.-  Professional autonomy and pressure from the political and economic spheres.-  Professionalization and media development, professional control and open participation. In the title, the object of study is labelled as “professional journalistic cultures” in Poland, Russia and Sweden. We know from cultural studies that cultures are not fixed, but remain in a constant flux and develop under influences from outside – from other cultures and areas. In journalism this becomes clear in the study of the history of journalism; for example in Sweden journalism has developed since the 18th century under French, German, British and American influence (Gustafsson and Rydén, 2010). The question is not if but how  journalistic cultures are changing; if globalization brings a more homogeneous journalistic culture, or if the development rather can be labelled as a hybridization where some element of global values and standards in journalism are adapted to national journalistic cultures (Hallin and Mancini, 2012:286).“Culture” is one of the key notions in this project, and the other is “professional”. To be a professional demands some kind of control over your own work, to have some kind of autonomy to follow the standards and values of the profession. Research in professions emphasize this autonomy as a question of power, about creating institutions making it possible for the members of the profession “to make a living while controlling their own work” (Freidson, 2001:17). Research has described a professionalization of journalism during the 20th century, but the question is how this is influenced by media development. Digital technology and commercialization are global trends, but how does this influence nationally rooted professional cultures? Are the consequences for professional autonomy the same in different kinds of media systems?For example: in Western countries, some researchers describe a de-professionalization of journalism: more unclear borders around the profession, harder economic conditions for traditional media and professional control questioned by an interactive network society (Nygren, 2008b:168, Örnebring, 2010b:568, Waisbord, 2013:60). But at the same time, journalists and media in many developing countries struggle for more professional control in relation to authoritarian regimes and also use new kinds of media platforms to achieve this. In countries with authoritarian regimes, professionalization can still be a strategy towards a greater degree of press freedom (Harro-Loit et al., 2012:153).In the project “Journalism in Change” we use theories on professionalization and comparative journalism research to analyze how  professional cultures are influenced by media development. Our basic assumption is that the changes are not the same in countries as different as Poland, Russia and Sweden. But it is also likely to find similarities – and these might bring  journalistic cultures closer to each other.In the  end there is also the underlying question about  media content; how are standards and practices among journalists influencing  journalistic content, which is so important for all citizens to construct their picture of the world? This project does not include analyses of media content, but the basic assumption is that journalists´ belief about standards and values and their professional practice also influence the results in newspapers, broadcasts on TV and radio and in online news sites.That is why professional journalistic cultures are not only a question for journalists, but for society as a whole.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Gunnar Nygren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Journalism in change. Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015. 41-62.

The object of this study is professional cultures among journalists in three countries. The first question in the process is to decide who is a journalist – and the answer is not evident. Deuze (2007:141) describes contemporary journalism as only one kind of work in the broad media sector – an industry with unclear borders between different parts and media workers going in and out of different professional roles. He calls them “portfolio workers” going between assignment and professional roles, which become liquid. Other research describes journalism as a profession passing through on the way to other  better paid jobs (Nygren, 2011:219; Pasti et al., 2012:280).In this study, journalists are defined as people professionally producing content based on facts (not fiction or entertainment) for what  we traditionally label as “mass media”, in contemporary debate also called “legacy media”: newspapers and magazines, TV and radio channels, online and digital formats connected to the traditional media industry. Also the growing number of “content producers” outside  media companies is included; freelancers  and those employed in production companies. This classic definition of a journalist has problems, for example the borders towards public relations, content marketing and towards entertainment in feature journalism. It also means that independent bloggers and people producing all kind of content produced for  social media platforms are not included in the definition, even if this content has journalistic qualities and sometimes also can generate incomes making it professional in some sense.It is likely that the definition of “journalists” is going to change, professional borders are not fixed forever and media development changes the industry quickly (Anderson et al., 2013). But still this old definition has relevance in relation to the content for daily media consumption. This old definition also makes it possible to connect to earlier research on journalists and their professional cultures in the coming analysis.In this chapter we give the reasons behind the choice of Poland, Russia and Sweden, and some background on professional journalism in these three countries. We also describe the design of the project and the research questions to be answered. The methods in accomplishing the survey and interviews are described in detail.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska

Elena JohanssonGunnar Nygren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Journalism in change. Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015. 9-18.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska

Gunnar Nygren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang Edition, 2015.

A transnational research project: “Journalism in Change: Professional journalistic culture in Poland, Russia, and Sweden” The purpose of the project “Journalism in Change” is to identify common parts of a transnational journalistic culture and common changes in journalism in general in different media systems, as well as the differences among the three selected countries. It is also possible to relate the results to national differences in history and culture, to analyze the relationship between globalization and national differences.The research design can be described as a “most-different” selection of cases. The project includes three countries representing different media systems, of different historical and political backgrounds and different sizes – Sweden, Russia and Poland, situated on the Baltic Sea. All of them have had  relationships in the past. They were intense between Poland and Sweden in the times of the 16th and 18th centuries, and between Sweden and Russia from the 12th to 19th century, and Poland and Russia have had a very deep relationship from medieval times until today. The communist period (1945-1989) was significant for Polish and Russian journalism and professional cultures. Despite a common geographical location and history, the three states are different in many aspects: journalistic culture  being influenced by different external factors, such as a democratic tradition (or lack of this experience), religion, education systems, economic development, and access to  new technologies of communication. In  fact, “Journalism in Change” is the first comparative project covering journalistic culture in these three countries.We were aware of these differences from the beginning, , but we also wanted to look at whether there are any similarities. With the study design it has become possible to analyze what changes in journalism in different types of society have in common, and what kind of differences come from the characteristics of each society. Who  takes part in the project and why? Journalism has experienced deep changes in recent  decades. For this reason, it seemed interesting to verify this general opinion in the case of only a few countries using  empirical research. The points of departure for this book are based on two variables – technical and economic; it was our  goal to observe how these two types of changes are influencing different media systems. The research project “Journalism in Change – professional journalistic cultures in Poland, Russia and Sweden” was conducted in the period  2011-2014. The project assumes a multidisciplinary approach, with researchers in journalism, media sociology, and political science. Researchers from Södertörn University (Sweden), Moscow State University (Russia) and University of Wrocław (Poland) worked together in the project to produce this final monograph. Two additional reports were published at the earlier stages of the project (Nygren et al., 2012; Anikina et al., 2013). Dissemination activities also include a number of articles published in scientific journals (Anikina, Dobek-Ostrowska and Nygren, 2013; Dobek- Ostrowska, Barczyszyn and Michel, 2013; Dobek-Ostrowska, Barczyszyn, Michel and Baranowski, 2013; Johansson, 2013, 2014; Johansson and Nygren, 2014; Nygren, 2012c). Hypotheses We formulated the two groups of hypotheses (see more 2.2.1.), which are important from the comparative perspective. The first group is linked with similarities/differences among journalistic cultures in three countries: H1: There is an increasing similarity in journalistic cultures in different media systems; market influence and liberal ideals are more common in pushing journalism in the direction of a commercialized Western model.H2: The similarities between journalistic cultures are mostly superficial, nationally rooted traditions of history and culture still deeply influence journalistic cultures and preserve differences between them. The liberal ideals in journalism are getting stronger with market liberalism; a global media culture is emerging (Hallin and Mancini, 2004). This hypothesis can be defined as a homogenization of journalism in different media systems under the influence of technological and economic development, and the counterhypothesis can be the opposite that the similarities are mostly superficial: H3: Media development makes the profession weaker as a collective, the borders of journalism are more diffuse and professional autonomy weaker. Journalism, both as media content and as a profession, will be more difficult to perceive, because it will be different from that which we knew during the 20th century.H4: Media development can strengthen the position of the individual journalist, giving him/her new possibilities both in research and in publishing. This can give journalists a new kind of autonomy. Other research shows that social institutions like journalism are  hesitant to abandon their  conventions even in the “age of the net” when communication patterns in  society are changed (O’Sullivan and Heionen, 2008). A professional culture is sluggish, and moves only slowly in spite of changes in the surroundings – technical, economic and political. Journalists are often seen as conservative, and research shows that fast changes also promote a reaction of defense of old values (Witschge and Nygren, 2009). This can also be defined as hybridization, when hybrid systems emerge, melting together elements from the global development and national history and traditions (Hallin and Mancini, 2012). Research questions The hypotheses presented below provoke a long list of research questions, which are presented by the authors in each chapter. The research questions are linked with an area of analysis, but in general, three fundamental questions were addressed: RQ1: What are the differences and similarities among  journalists in Poland, Russia and Sweden when it comes to the basic dimensions (age, sex, education and professional training, membership of  professional associations), working conditions, professional autonomy of the individual, organizational and societal level, ideals, standards and values of research’s participants, their relationship with politics and politicians, their attitudes towards commercialization, the new technologies used in  journalistic practice?RQ2: What are the most important factors explaining the differences observed between media systems?RQ3: How are the factors mentioned in RQ1 influenced by media development in the three countries? Methods The researchers from the three countries participated in the research workshops and in accomplishing the research. Three methods were used: Survey/quantitative data analysis: A total 1500 respondents – a sample of 500 journalists from each country - Poland, Russia and Sweden, participated in the survey (see more 2.2.3.).Interview/qualitative data analysis: 60 in-depth interviews were conducted with a broad selection of 20 journalists in each country (see more 2.2.4).The survey and the interviews have covered several areas:Who are the journalists? – age, gender and social position, income, and education.The daily work – employment and conditions, perceived autonomy and influence.Professional identity and relation to politics, commercialism and media owners.Attitudes towards technology, interactivity and change in work. Social media use and multiskilling.Professional roles in society, quality and press freedom.Quantitative and qualitative comparative analysis: Surveys and interviews which were conducted in the three countries allowed  us to use the received results for analyzing data sets by listing and counting all the combinations of variables observed in the data set. We compared the unique combination of values of its independent and dependent variables. We compared the data as numbers, percentages, standard deviation, means, factor analysis, and Pearson correlation.The project has not studied journalism performance and media content. It has focused on the journalists, on how they think about their role in society and in  media companies, about their daily work and their reflections on change. For example,  journalists gave opinions on the quality of journalism, answering the question of whether it could be said to decrease, or not. There are no empirical data to support these opinions, no content analyses. The results are only the opinions of the journalists.But in a comparative perspective, this still can bring new knowledge. It is possible to compare different generations, journalists in different kinds of media and in different media systems. What the journalists say has  relevance, as long as we believe there is a connection between what you think and how  you act. Monograph “Journalism in Change” This book is designed as a series of comparative chapters in different areas. Each author is responsible for the chapter, but the results have been discussed in the group and were carefully evaluated.In Chapter One Gunnar Nygren gives a theoretical background to comparative journalism studies. The study covers theories on professions, autonomy, as well as research on how current media developments influence journalism.In Chapter Two, background information on media systems in three selected countries is provided by Gunnar Nygren, Bogusława Dobek-Ostrowska, and Elena Johansson. The manuscript also contains a description of methods in the survey and the interviews and how the results have been analyzed.In   Chapter Three Michał Głowacki makes attempts to answer the question “Who is a journalist today?” He puts the emphasis on selected dimensions of comparative studies of journalism: demographic traits and facts on education, conditions of employment and the role professional associations.In   Chapter Four  Jöran Hök analyzes  daily work practices, working conditions, multiskilling and other dimensions of daily work.In Chapter Five Gunnar Nygren focuses on the perceived autonomy among journalists and the degree of freedom within given frames in the three countries, as well as on political and commercial pressure on journalists in their daily work.In Chapter Six Maria Anikina analyzes ideals and values, professional ethics and attitudes towards society. Also verification and other key values are analyzed in relation to media developments.In Chapter Seven Bogusława Dobek-Ostrowska analyzes the relationship between journalism and politics, both the political preferences of journalists and how politics interferes in news processes.In Chapter Eight Bogusława Dobek-Ostrowska analyzes the relationship between journalism and commercialization. This includes foreign ownership and also external economic pressure.In   Chapter Nine Elena Johansson analyzes how journalists relate to social media, how they use social media and for  what purposes.In   Chapter Ten Gunnar Nygren and Bogusława Dobek-Ostrowska summarize the analysis, and relate the results to other comparative research in journalism. They discuss the questions of homogenization of journalism globally, or if  development is more likely to be described as hybridization of journalism with new forms of media systems emerging. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska

Gunnar Nygren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Marinarkeologisk tidskrift 2015, 1 : 23-26.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Johan Rönnby

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

MARIS

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archaeology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

PArticipation and COnflict 2015, 8 (3): 845-875.

Radical left-libertarian movements are often regarded as primarily seeking ways to accom-plish social and political change outside the framework of institutionalized politics. Previous research, however, has paid little or no attention to the question of these activists’ actual interactions with institu-tionalized politics, nor has it addressed the ways these interactions could be understood in relation to their overall strategies and ideology. This article therefore explores whether, and to what extent, such interaction actually occurs and analyzes the meanings and motives radical left-libertarian activists – from anarchist, autonomist, and anarcho-syndicalist groups – attribute to various types of political actions, ranging from voting and lobbying to protests and direct action. We furthermore compare activists in Po-land and Sweden, in order to scrutinize whether cross-country differences in “political opportunities” affects the activists’ political strategies and ideas about how social and political change can best be ac-complished. Contrary to popular beliefs and many activists’ own self-declarations, our analysis shows that radical left-libertarian groups do in fact try to achieve political change by interacting with institution-alized politics. While radical left-libertarian activists do in most cases prefer “direct action”, this article explores how a more complex relationship to institutionalized politics allows them to accomplish real and immediate changes at the grassroots level.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Grzegorz PiotrowskiMagnus Wennerhag

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Finnish Review of East European Studies 2015, 3 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Maria Viljanen

Kimmo Granqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Education


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Finnish Review of East European Studies 2015, 3 : 3-17.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anton Tenser

Kimmo Granqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Education


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: De finska romernas historia från svenska tiden till 2000-talet. Stockholm : Bokförlaget Atlantis, 2015. 288-303.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Kimmo Granqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Education


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing. Abingdon : Routledge, 2015. 19-34.

In this chapter I will attempt to develop a phenomenology of parts of the human body that have been removed from their site of origin but nevertheless preserve their “aliveness.” What happens when human body parts are stored in the medical laboratory and are even being transformed or cultivated there? How are we to view the ontological and ethical status of cells and organs that are being transplanted from one human body to another? Do these body parts preserve some kind of relationship to their source of origin: that is, the person from whom they have been retrieved? Do they belong to the person they originate from and, if so, in what way? What implications does this type of ownership have for ethical analysis? In some cases, at least, would the concept of sharing be more adequate in describing transfer of body parts between persons than the idea of a gift being made?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Studies in Practical Knowledge


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Europe-Asia Studies 2015, 67 (10): 1635-1655.

Dramatic fluctuations have occurred in population health in Russia since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Although many factors have been examined in connection with this, there has been little focus on the role of the family, despite evidence from Western studies linking family functioning to individual health. Using data from 1,190 respondents collected during the Moscow Health Survey 2004 we examined the association between family relations and health outcomes. Poorer family functioning was strongly associated with worse self-rated physical health and mental health. Our results suggest that the proximal social environment of the family is important for understanding health outcomes in contemporary Russia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ai Koyanagi

Andrew Stickley

Zhanna Kravchenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Divan 2015, 1-2 : 14-21.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Aesthetics


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

New York : Columbia University Press, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Aesthetics


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Studia Anglica Posnaniensia 2015, 50 (2-3): 7-20.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liz Kella

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

English


Research area for doctoral studies

-

HavsUtsikt 2015, 1 : 8-9.

Gapet är stort mellan miljömål och miljötillstånd i Östersjön. De omfattande insatser som görs av offentliga institutioner, näringsliv och allmänhet räcker inte. Samtidigt finns ett stort och växande engagemang från många politiker, företagare och enskilda för att stärka havsmiljöarbetet. När vi nu summerar ett större treårigt forskningsprojekt finner vi viktiga ledtrådar till vägar som kan leda till en förbättrad situation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Michael Gilek

Mikael Karlsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Finskt museum 2015, 120/122 (2013/2015): 179-189.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Niklas Eriksson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

MARIS

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archaeology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Archiva Moldaviae 2015, VII : 255-274.

This article is a contribution to the understanding of the bias and limitations that different kind of sources offer to the researcher in the contemporary history. Specifically, the study addresses how the researcher poses him/herself in front of the problems generated by different kinds of source materials, acknowledging Hans-Georg Gadamer’s Truth and Method, and proposes how to deal with the different kind of narratives proposed by the sources. The specific field of investigation chosen for this study is the history of historiography under communism, and specifically of the History Institute of the Romanian Communism Party, a central party institution for history-writing existing in Romania between 1951 and 1990. The researcher has at his/her disposition different typologies of sources for this study, first of all the archival sources conserved at the National Archives of Romania (the archive of the Institute, the funds of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party, the familial fund of the Institute’s director, Ion Popescu-Puţuri), and the funds present at the National Council for the Study of the Securitate Archives on the Institute’s historians. The article demonstrates, relying on a consolidated tradition of historical methodology, that these sources offer several limitations: they already offer a narrative, they are incomplete, and they have been subject to manipulation. A second resource for the historian are the memoires of the historians of the communist period, working at the Institute or in similar institutions. This second kind of sources, analysed trough the instruments offered by memory studies and post-colonial studies, is considerate as biased for numerous reasons: they were written after 1989, in some cases with an apologetic or justificatory intent; the researcher cannot easily distinguish information from the affection of memory, which is generated by the collective and vernacular memory that has been created after 1989. The authors of these autobiographies have imagined and framed the materials of their memory according to the discourses elaborated by a series of social frameworks (and networks) in which they lived, including the national one, and they contributed with their memories to the forging of a new image of the networks in which they are inserted. A third kind of sources is offered by the methodology of oral history, namely interviews with former historians of the Institute. In this case, the advantage for the researcher to create ad hoc sources for the purposes of the study is counterbalanced by the limitations of these sources, which are the same as for the autobiographies, with the addition of the performative aspect that is contextual within the interview. The article concludes that no source can claim the status of “truth”. Therefore, the distance between different typologies of sources result to be shortened. In conclusion, the researcher has only partially the possibility to obviate the bias offered by the sources with a strong research question. The researcher’s only possibility to establish a new narrative on a topic is to merge the horizon and the research questions and expectations with the narrative presented by the sources, as explained by Gadamer.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Journal of Baltic Studies 2015, 46 (4): 427-434.

The Baltic refugees of the Second World War, in Sweden, were part of the opening up of Sweden to immigration. New research, after the turn of the century, has shown how this change of policy was part of the emerging welfare state, embracing a wider geographical area. Still, the opening was conditioned by degrees of Nordicness and the conditions of neutrality toward Germany and not least the Soviet Union. This review article highlights some of the new insights of Swedish historiography.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anu Mai Köll

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Warsaw : Instytut Badań Edukacyjnych, 2015. ( ; )

Finnish system of education is widely discussed and often used as role model of a modern educational system that is adjusted to the needs of the society and national economy. This analysis covers current issues pertaining to the functioning of Finnish higher education institutions and to their finances. It attempts to point at mechanisms and institutions that are responsible for the functioning of the higher education system, by paying attention to the professional, administrative and legal issues. With a short reference to the historical developments, the most important higher education reforms are presented as changing the financial foundation of the whole sector. In a comparative perspective it may be seen as innovative thinking about public management and about efficient use of the public finances.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Kazimierz Musial

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Karlskrona : Blekinge museum, 2015. (Blekinge Museum Rapport ; 2015:21)

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ingvar Sjöblom

Johan RönnbyNiklas Eriksson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

MARIS

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archaeology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Rim Economies 2015, 5 : 42-42.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Scientific Drilling 2015, 20 : 1-12.

The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 347 cored sediments from different settings of the Baltic Sea covering the last glacial–interglacial cycle. The main aim was to study the geological development of the Baltic Sea in relation to the extreme climate variability of the region with changing ice cover and major shifts in temperature, salinity, and biological communities. Using the Greatship Manisha as a European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) mission-specific platform, we recovered 1.6 km of core from nine sites of which four were additionally cored for microbiology. The sites covered the gateway to the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean, several sub-basins in the southern Baltic Sea, a deep basin in the central Baltic Sea, and a river estuary in the north. The waxing and waning of the Scandinavian ice sheet has profoundly affected the Baltic Sea sediments. During theWeichselian, progressing glaciers reshaped the submarine landscape and displaced sedimentary deposits from earlier Quaternary time. As the glaciers retreated they left a complex pattern of till, sand, and lacustrine clay, which in the basins has since been covered by a thick deposit of Holocene, organic-rich clay. Due to the stratified water column of the brackish Baltic Sea and the recurrent and widespread anoxia, the deeper basins harbor laminated sediments that provide a unique opportunity for high-resolution chronological studies. The Baltic Sea is a eutrophic intra-continental sea that is strongly impacted by terrestrial runoff and nutrient fluxes. The Holocene deposits are recorded today to be up to 50m deep and geochemically affected by diagenetic alterations driven by organic matter degradation. Many of the cored sequences were highly supersaturated with respect to methane, which caused strong degassing upon core recovery. The depth distributions of conservative sea water ions still reflected the transition at the end of the last glaciation from fresh-water clays to Holocene brackish mud. High-resolution sampling and analyses of interstitial water chemistry revealed the intensive mineralization and zonation of the predominant biogeochemical processes. Quantification of microbial cells in the sediments yielded some of the highest cell densities yet recorded by scientific drilling.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Bo Barker Jørgensen

Elinor AndrenThomas Andrén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Conference Proceedings “GSOM Emerging Markets International Conference: Business and Government Perspectives, 15-17 October, 2015, Graduate School of Management, St. Petersburg University, Russia”. St. Petersburg : GSOM St. Petersburg, Russia.

The objective of this paper is to describe and explain company strategies under uncertainty. It attempts to examine more closely the interaction of research on strategic management with internationalization theory and the dimension of uncertainty. This study builds on the empirical data from a survey conducted in 2015 among 73 Swedish companies operating in Russia. The findings support several concepts of strategic management and internationalization theory, but also reveal some phenomena that would require further investigation. These include a domination of expansion strategy chosen by Swedish firms during the current escalation of uncertainty in Russia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Olga Golubeva


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Baltic Worlds 2015, VIII (3-4): 76-86.

The article addresses the issue of the business climate in Russia from the Swedish investors' perspective and relates its to a general theoretical debate in the field. Statistical tests suggests that the majority of variables relating to the business climate has deteriorated between 2012 and 2014. The findings support several mainstream theories regarding the business climate but also demonstrate some contradictions that would require further investigation. These include the reaction of Swedish business to the escalation of political tensions between Russia and the West and the factor of corruption, which is not viewed as serious enough to fully discourage foreign investors from staying in Russia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Olga Golubeva


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Förenen eder!. Landskrona : Centrum för Arbetarhistoria, 2015. 55-79.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mats Lindqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: After the Soviet Empire. Leiden/Boston : Brill Academic Publishers, 2015. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jon Wittrock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

RIG 2015, 98 (2-3): 145-148.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Petra Garberding

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Ethnology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2015. (Working Paper ; 2015:5)

Payments for Ecological Services (PES) has rapidly emerged around the world as a key environmental governance approach. This paper is concerned with Agricultural Environmental Schemes (AES) as a particular form of PES to improve the environmental performance of agriculture particularly in relation to water quality in Sweden. Win-win descriptions prevail in AES policy discourse to describe the simultaneous achievement of environmental goals and economic outcomes for farmers. AES are underpinned by an instrumental assumption that farmer behaviour can be influenced towards adopting better environmental practice by providing monetary incentives (or at least compensation). This paper has touched on a number of contentions in the PES literature, including: doubts about how well standardised PES schemes link with local conditions; how and whether PES schemes can engender local innovation; procedural and distributive equity concerns; claims that monetary incentives may ‘crowd out’ socially derived sources of motivation (local norms); and doubts about whether PES schemes, disembedded from local institutions, can deliver ‘sufficient’ environmental behavioural change. Given the relatively recent emergence of AES schemes, it is important that we learn more from the experience of implementation. Critically oriented empirically-based research then has the capacity to work as a circuit breaker between ideologically driven arguments that side either for or against the use of market mechanisms, such as AES for environmental governance. Such insights may be useful to help focus research on farmer engagement with AES that subjects it to greater empirical scrutiny and validation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fred Saunders

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Rossiiskaya Istoriya 2015, 5 : 181-184.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yulia Gradskova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Lanham : Lexington Books, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sara Sanders

Yulia Gradskova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Institutionalizing gender equality. Lanham : Lexington Books, 2015. 1-18.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sara Sanders

Yulia Gradskova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Institutionalizing gender equality. Lanham : Lexington Books, 2015. 229-244.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yulia Gradskova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Histories of Public Diplomacy and Nation Branding in the Nordic and Baltic Countries. Leiden, Boston : Brill Academic Publishers, 2015. 257-279.

In recent years there has been increased political attention paid to the uses of public diplomacy by different countries for improving their economies, projecting identity, and achieving other policy goals. Within this framework this chapter seeks to explain Nordic involvement in/with the Baltic States in the past two decades. The communicative practice, interactions and building relations among these states provides a case that can be studied with respect to how states or associations of states understand cultures, attitudes and behaviour, build and manage relationships, and influence opinions and actions, which more or less intentionally advance their interests and values.The analysis in this chapter is anchored in the domain of international relations, with focus on the interdependencies created by the development aid and assistance that the Nordic states granted to Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania when they broke free from the Soviet Union. The increasing tendency on the part of the Nordic states to act as agenda setters in the Baltic region is also discussed, which  allows for viewing their actions as active international policy or, to use more contemporary terminology, as skilfully exercised public diplomacy. It proved all the more successful as the Baltic republics desired international recognition and longed to become fully-fledged parts of the West.The analysis of how norms and agendas propagated by the Nordic countries have become accepted in the Baltic states is pursued here with a working hypothesis claiming that the assumed civilizational achievement of the allegedly superior Western standards, gained from the cooperation with the Nordic states, made the Baltic actors readily accept the infusion of local institutions with Nordic norms, values and practices. The process was rapid and mostly one- directional to the extent that instead of mutual learning, typical for partners that cooperate on equal footing, the Nordic countries carried out an action that I describe as cognitive colonisation of the Baltic elites and publics. This meant that the political landscape and the decision makers’ agendas have been saturated with institutional structures, metaphors and other discursive short-cuts favourable to the Nordic countries – which represented Western Europe – to the extent that they became parts of the taken-for-granted cognitive schemas.Their institutional embeddedness was possible because a symbolic system, garnished with the English language functioning as a lingua francaof the Western civilisation, was transmitted along with the Nordic assistance, which consisted of patterns of behaviour, signs and meanings, delivered together with modes of their interpretation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Kazimierz Musial

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Swedish


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Finnish Review of East European Studies 2015, 22 (3): 90-92.

Review of the Nordic Romani Studies Conference

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Florence FröhligJaakko Turunen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

School of Social Sciences

Ethnology

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

In contrast to other branches, media companies are criticized as ‘lagging behind’ in becoming ethnically diverse, and they are too slow in making progress of diversity efforts (e.g. Horsti & Hultén, 2011; Graf, 2011; Markova & McKay, 2013, Horsti et al 2014). For example, when it comes to media professionals with migrant backgrounds, the numbers are very low: Only three percent of journalists have a migrant background according to a survey of the German Journalist Association in 2007 (Poettker 2013). Especially, black television journalists in Germany are rare. There are no news anchors of African origin, and there are only a few isolated cases of entertainment programs, where black journalists are in front of a camera.This paper examines how media companies assess the importance of this issue of diverse workforce. As I am especially interested in the workforce (and not in programming), I have mainly interviewed 10 HR managers and staff who are responsible for personnel development and diversity issues within German media organizations during the fall of 2013 and the spring of 2014, and looked at their documented policies and diversity programs. In this paper, I focus on how HR managers, mainly from private media companies, observe the communication climate for diversity issues in their organization, and how they address recruitment obstacles.  More concretely, I want to explore, first, how the topic of a diverse workforce becomes an organizational problem (or not), and, second, which solutions appear and on the basis of which expectations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Heike Graf

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Nordicom Review 2015, 36 (2): 79-95.

Degree of autonomy is one of the key dimensions of professionalization in journalism. However, the strive for autonomy looks different in different media systems, where pressure on autonomy can come from both political and commercial powers, outside and within the media. Media development also changes the conditions for professional autonomy for journalists, in both a positive and a negative sense. In the comparative research project “Journalism in change”, the journalistic cultures in Russia, Poland and Sweden are studied. In a survey involving 1500 journalists from the three countries, journalists report on their perceived autonomy in their daily work and in relation to different actors inside and outside the media. The survey covers how the work has been changed by media developments, and how these changes have affected journalists’perceived autonomy. The results show similarities in the strive for autonomy, but also clear differences in how autonomy is perceived by journalists in the three countries.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

B. Dobek-Ostrowska

Gunnar Nygren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Beyond the Divide. New York and London : Berghahn Books, 2015. 237-256.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Lundgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Louis Clerc

Paul Jordan


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Histories of Public Diplomacy and Nation Branding in the Nordic and Baltic Countries. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2015. 227-236.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Paul Jordan


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jörgen Straarup

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jörgen Straarup

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Sovijus 2015, 3 (2): 68-85.

The extent and content of boundary barrier functions can be explained by decisionsmade by the neighbouring states and their implementation on the local level. Withthe sudden changes of government and governance in 1989–1991 in Eastern andCentral Europe, the relation between individual and state changed drastically,from top-down, 'socialist' state-territorially contained relations into a moremultidimensional relationship where democratic bottom-up influences plays a moreimportant role, but where also commercial interests, mediated information andsupra-state ('international') regulation intervene. In the juxtaposition of territorialstates, the difference in jurisdiction between hierarchical levels has led to misfits,asymmetries that negatively impact the possibilities for cross-border co-operation.Using a cultural trait, that of religion as a measure of internal and cross-borderinteraction, the following questions were asked: What is the relation between theterritorial ("nation") state, civil society and education in border towns? Will the localteaching of religion be influenced by the proximity of a different state with anotherset of cultural and jurisdictional norms? The questions were approached withexamples from the teaching of religion, ethics and civics in northeastern Europeanborder areas, involving border twin towns in Norway, Russia, Finland, Estonia,Latvia, Poland and Germany. The present study involved four different academicdisciplines; the study of religion, education, geography and political science.Information about the teaching of religion and ethics was made throughstructured interviews with teachers and principals of selected schools made byassistants fluent in the language(s) of the locality. Questions were also asked aboutthe use of religious and other symbols, the celebration of holidays and other eventsThe study resulted in a general rejection of the hypotheses. Education,especially related to religion, civics and ethics, is almost completely influenced by thehomogeneous territorial jurisdiction of each state. Local civil society plays a minorrole in the teaching. Local religious groups are usually not invited to the schools,and parents show little interest in the teaching contents of school life. The existenceof cross-border migrants is to some extent taken into consideration in languageteaching, but not in civics or religion. While cross-border relations are friendly, theyare rarely intense.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Dagens Nyheter 2015, 26 oktober : 16-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

European science review 2015, 5-6 : 173-175.

The article considers Russian-Swedish cooperation in the sphere of innovations. A brief overview of main results of the study of large Swedish enterprises operating in the direction of development and implementation of innovations in the sphere of sustainable development in Russia is given. An analysis of major tendencies as well as problems and limitations in this sphere is presented. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Victoria Grigorieva

Maria Smolander

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Социальные Aспекты Здоровья Hаселения [Social Aspects of Population Health] 2015, 4 (44): -.

Background: Existence of systematic health differences between people with different socio-economic status has been confirmed by many studies. At the same time, social relations have been found to be an important determinant of health. Some scholars consider social relations as mediator between socioeconomic status and health. However, studies on this subject are scattered and inconsistent. At the same time, it remains unclear how social relations are distributed according to socio-economic status. The study, the results of which are presented in this work, is an attempt to examine relationship between socio-economic status, social relations and health.Purpose: The purposes of the study are: 1) to explore relationship between socio-economic status and social relations; 2) to confirm association between social relations and health; 3) to reveal whether social relations mediate association between socio-economic status and health.Methods: The study is based on data of the European Social Survey, Round 5. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression models. Three indicators were selected to measure social relations: presence of a family partner, confidentiality availability (presence of someone with whom it is possible to discuss intimate and personal matters) and social participation (communication with people for enjoyment rather than for reasons of work or duty). Socioeconomic status was assessed by the level of education, employment and financial situation. Self-rated health on a one-five scale was used as health (illness) indicator.Results: It was found out that socio-economically disadvantaged persons are at greater risk of social isolation, which, in turn, has negative effect on health. Social relations explain up to 21% of the socio-economic inequalities in self-rated health of the Russian people.Conclusions: The received results show the need to promote social support and social integration especially among people with low socio-economic status, which can contribute to reduce health inequalities.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Olga Kislitsyna

Sara Ferlander

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Histories of Public Diplomacy and Nation Branding in the Nordic and Baltic Countries. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2015. 172-194.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Ajalooline Ajakiri. The Estonian Historical Journal 2015, 153 (3): 223-248.

This article analyzes Swedish political scientist and conservative politician Rudolf Kjellén’s advocacy in favour of a Swedish "Baltic program" directed at the Baltic Sea region and Russia in the decades preceding the First World War. These Baltic ambitions as well as their legacy in the interwar period are studied as a series of exercises in "para-diplomacy" on three different levels: 1) as a geopolitical reconstruction of a Baltic-Nordic "space of expectation;" 2) as a kind of Baltic-Nordic regionalism based upon early notions of "soft power;" and 3) as an inspiration to the geopolitical outlook of the Swedish military elite, business circles and trade policy-makers in the time period from the First World War up to the Second World War. This "region-work in the margins" contributed to modernizing Swedish conservative elites’ geopolitical outlook into an ostensibly less aggressive vision of Swedish international influence through cultural, economic, and technological prowess.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Ajalooline Ajakiri. The Estonian Historical Journal 2015, 153 (3): 213-222.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mart Kuldkepp

Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Tartu : University of Tartu Press, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mart Kuldkepp

Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

BMC Public Health 2015, 15 : -.

Background: Criminal victimisation and subjective well-being have both been linked to health outcomes, although as yet, comparatively little is known about the relationship between these two phenomena. In this study we used data from nine countries of the former Soviet Union (fSU) to examine the association between different types of crime and subjective well-being. Methods: Data were obtained from 18,000 individuals aged 18 and above collected during the Health in Times of Transition (HITT) survey in 2010/11 in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia and Ukraine. Information was obtained on respondents' experience of crime (violence and theft) and self-reported affective (happiness) and cognitive (life satisfaction) well-being. Ordered probit and ordinary least squares (OLS) regression analyses were undertaken to examine the associations between these variables. Results: In pooled country analyses, experiencing violence was associated with significantly lower happiness and life satisfaction. Theft victimisation was associated with significantly reduced life satisfaction but not happiness. Among the individual countries, there was a more pronounced association between violent victimisation and reduced happiness in Kazakhstan and Moldova. Conclusions: The finding that criminal victimisation is linked to lower levels of subjective well-being highlights the importance of reducing crime in the fSU, and also of having effective support services in place for victims of crime to reduce its detrimental effects on health and well-being.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ai Koyanagi

Andrew Stickley


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Peter Hedberg

Mikael Lönnborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

ENTER forum

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Global and Planetary Change 2015, 134 (SI): 142-154.

High resolution palaeoenvironmental records in Far-Eastern Russia are rare, and the Kamchatka Peninsula is among the least studied areas of the region. This paper describes a record spanning the last ca. 11,000 yr, obtained from a bog in the southern part of Kamchatka. The radiocarbon dated core was analysed for pollen, testate amoebae, charcoal and loss-on-ignition (LOI).The vegetation during the early Holocene was dominated by grasses (Poaceae), birch (Betula) and heath (Ericaceae p. p.). Around 10,300 cal yr BP there was a substantial change in the vegetation cover to shrub alder (Alnus viridis s.l.) stands with sedges and ferns (Polypodiophyta) as well as herbs such as meadow rue (Thalictrum) in the understory. In the surroundings of Utka peatlands started to form. The variations in the vegetation cover were most probably caused by climatic changes. At the beginning of sediment accumulation, before 10,300 cal yr BP, the composition of the vegetation points to cooler summers and/or decreased annual precipitation. Around 10,300 cal yr BP, changes in vegetation occurred due to rising temperatures and/or changed water regimes. Increased abundancies of dry indicating testate amoebae after 9100 cal yr BP point to intermediate to dry soil conditions. Between 8600 and 7700 cal yr BP tree alder (Alnus incana) was widely spread at the site which probably indicates optimal environmental conditions. The tephra layer at 381–384.5 cm (ca. 8500 cal yr BP) produces a strong impact on the testate amoebae assemblages. At 7700 cal yr BP there was a sudden drop of A.incana in the local vegetation. From this time on, A.incana and also A.viridis decrease continuously whereas Betula gradually increases. The upper part of the sequence (after 6300 cal yr BP) shows higher abundancies of meadowsweet (Filipendula) and sweet gale (Myrica) pollen. After 6300 cal yr BP, changes in testate amoebae demonstrate variable soil moisture conditions at the site. Between 3700 and 1800 cal yr BP, wet conditions dominate as dry indicating testate amoebae decrease. After 1800 cal yr BP soil conditions become more variable again but this time with dry dominating testate amoebae.In contrast to surrounding regions, there is no evidence of trees such as spruce or larch growing in the surroundings of the site even though those trees are characteristic of many eastern Siberian sites. This difference might be because of the maritime influence of the Okhotsk Sea. Even dwarf pine (Pinus pumila), which is currently widely dispersed in northern Kamchatka, became part of the local vegetation only during the last 700 yr.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andrea Klimaschewski

Elinor Andren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Baltic Worlds 2015, 1-2 : 36-37.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Ab Imperio 2015, 2015 (2): 339-362.

When discussing Bolshevik cultural politics, both scholars and the public today emphasize what the Bolsheviks destroyed. In this essay, however, the focus is on what they “preserved,” and especially how they preserved it, to what purpose, and with what consequences. The article reconstructs the ideology and practices of cultural heritage in Soviet Russia from the vantage point of Bolshevik policies in reuses of the past. As an example, in reading the writing of the authority in Soviet cultural heritage industry, Igor Grabar, the author reconstructs the process of aestheticization, commodification, and internationalization of the Russian Orthodox icon.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Krajobraz spolecznosciowy - Polska 2014 [Social landscape Poland 2014]. Warszawa : Centrum Wspierania Aktywności Lokalnej/CAL, 2015. 27-46.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Urban Grassroots Movements in Central and Eastern Europe. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. 195-218.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Budapest : Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Daniel Mikecs

Grzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Intersections. East European Journal of Society and Politics 2015, 1 (3): 4-15.

The idea for this issue emerged in Budapest during a two-day workshop on social movements in Central and Eastern Europe. The ideas behind this workshop (and thus this issue) was to discuss the specificity of civil mobilizations in the region and to contribute to academic debates ongoing since the transformation of 1989. Is there a regional specificity of social activism? Is, and if yes, how social activism is different from other parts of the world? Does this imply different theoretical and analytical approach? Other questions, closely linked to these are, how Eastern Europe is defined, characterized and constructed? How the eastern European context and environment affect social movements and mobilizations in the region? The main goal of this article is to present the main discussions among social movement academics and practitioners in the region and to deconstruct some of the clichés about grassroots activism in Eastern Europe that arose over the years.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Grzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Multicultural Discourses 2015, 10 (3): 313-331.

From a critical analytical framework, this article analyses survey responses conveying Swedish and German police officers' understanding of discriminatory behaviour in the workplace. The article relates discursive constructions of discrimination made in respondents' accounts of potential factors behind discrimination, and in positioning oneself. Taking into account previous studies on constructions of discrimination, this study develops and proposes some key strategies of explication of the cultural meanings assigned to forms of discrimination as well as justification of or resistance to discriminatory behaviour in professional contexts. Resistance to discrimination is displayed through (1) exposition of reasons behind discrimination, (2) display of a critical self-image and (3) strategic choice of mode of report. Differences to be found between Swedish and German respondents are attention to detail, to underlying factors in discrimination and to typical communicative practices regarding discriminatory behaviour. Sexism is acknowledged as a violation to a comparatively high degree, whereas racism is reported much less.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mats Landqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Swedish


Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Journal of Global Ethics 2015, 11 (2): 246-256.

The purpose of this article is threefold. First, it aims to delineate the flow of resources and the claims on those resources within the humanitarian aid system by locating task structures and functional units across the aid chain. Second, it draws on this account to highlight tensions in the system. Different stations in the organisational process are conditioned by the tasks assigned to them, how those tasks are anchored in a moral economy, and their historical interrelations. Third, it explores how aid organisations are perceived by experts in different parts of the aid chain. Four key agents were invited to recount their work experiences. We then consider how the outlook of the interviewees was shaped by their place in the aid chain. The interviews are an inventory of experiences, a preliminary corroboration of the organisational analysis that preceded them, and a source of future hypotheses. © 2015 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Katarina Friberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Asian Politics & Policy 2015, 7 (3): 505-511.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

-

International journal of sociology and social policy 2015, 35 (7-8): 565-580.

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore urban mobilisation patterns in two post-Soviet cities: Vilnius and Moscow. Both cities were subject to similar housing and urban policy during Soviet times, and they have implemented urban development using neoliberal market principles, provoking grassroots opposition from citizens to privatisation and marketisation of their housing environment and local public space. However, the differing conditions of democratic Lithuanian and authoritarian Russian public governance offer different opportunities and set different constraints for neighbourhood mobilisation. The purpose is to contrast local community mobilisations under the two regimes and highlight the differences between and similarities in the activists' repertoires of actions in two distinct political and economic urban settings. Design/methodology/approach - The paper employs qualitative methodology using data from semi-structured interviews conducted with community activists and state officials, presented using a comparative case study design. Findings - Although, citizens' mobilisations in the two cities are reactions to the neoliberalisation of housing and local public space, they take different forms. In Vilnius they are institutionalised and receive formal support from national and local authorities. Moreover, support from the EU encourages organisational development and provides material and cognitive resources for grassroots urban mobilisations. In contrast, residents' mobilisations in Moscow are informal and face fierce opposition from local authorities. However, even in an authoritarian setting, grassroots mobilisations evolve using creative strategies to circumvent institutional constraints. Originality/value - Little attention has been paid to grassroots urban mobilisations in post-Soviet cities. There is also a lack of comparative attempts to show variation in post-Soviet urban activism related to housing and local public space.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Christian Fröhlich

Jolanta Aidukaite


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Urban Grassroots Movements in Central and Eastern Europe. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. 273-288.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Kerstin Jacobsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Urban Grassroots Movements in Central and Eastern Europe. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. 1-32.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Kerstin Jacobsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Urban Grassroots Movements in Central and Eastern Europe. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. 247-272.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jolanta Aidukaite

Kerstin Jacobsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In 2004, Mikheil Saakashvili was elected president in Georgia, committing to a foreign policy that would ostensibly make his country a leading example of reform and democratization in the post-Soviet space, and a net-contributor to Euro-Atlantic security. Throughout its time in power and until its defeat in Georgia’s 2012 parliamentary elections, the Saakashvili government remained steadfast in its commitment to establishing these international roles for Georgia, despite developments in both the country’s international and domestic contexts that could plausibly have made these roles, and the foreign policy decisions deriving from them, redundant.This dissertation explores the relationship between national role conceptions (NRCs) and foreign policy stability. It demonstrates how Georgia’s NRCs as a Beacon of Liberty and a Net-Security Contributor, evolving specifically in the relationship between the Georgian and U.S. governments during these years, contributed to stability in Georgia’s foreign policy. Yet these NRCs were also subjected to serious challenges, particularly relating to two crises ensuing over the November 2007 riots in Tbilisi and the August 2008 war between Georgia and Russia. In both cases, the Georgian government was subjected to conflicting imperatives emanating from its own role conceptions, the expectations voiced by its U.S. counterparts, and the immediate demands of crisis decision making.Drawing on recent advances in foreign policy role theory and crisis management theory, two social mechanisms are developed, role location and role conflict management. Role location is a long-term process of interaction between the actor and significant others, resulting in a gradual harmonization of role expectations and intentions. Role conflict management instead represents the actor’s handling of potentially disruptive moments, raising questions about the credibility and legitimacy of existing NRCs in the eyes of others, and confronting the actor with choices regarding stability and change in existing NRCs.The framework is applied in an analysis of the Georgian government’s foreign policy vis-à-vis the U.S. in the years 2004-2012, with particular attention to the disruptive effects of the crises in 2007-2008, and the actions taken to address the resulting role conflicts. The analysis draws on unique first-hand material, including interviews with members of the Georgian and U.S. foreign policy elites, confidential diplomatic correspondence and official speeches, to uncover the processes by which the mechanisms of role location and role conflict management played out in Georgia’s foreign policy. The dissertation concludes that the stability in Georgia’s foreign policy stemmed from the fact that the two NRCs became deeply socially embedded in Georgia’s relations with the U.S. over time, but also from the Georgian government’s ability to adapt its NRCs in response to crises, the role expectations of significant others, and contextual change. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Eriksson

Niklas Nilsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Nordic Cooperation. London : Routledge, 2015. 49-68.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Heidi Haggrén

Norbert Götz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Zeitschrift für Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung 2015, 64 (2): 218-238.

Eine deutschbaltische Frauenbewegung. Der Deutsche Frauenbund zu Riga als Bewahrer des Deutschtums im demokratischen Lettland, 1919-1934 Die Forschungsliteratur über die deutschbaltischen Frauen schließt für gewöhnlich die Möglichkeit einer als politische Bewegung verstandenen deutschbaltischen Frauenbewegung aus. Der vorliegende Artikel spricht sich für eine weiter gefasste Definition von „Frauenbewegung“ aus und plädiert dafür, den Deutschen Frauenbund zu Riga als einen Teil von ihr zu verstehen. Zu diesem Zweck werden Quellen aus dem Umfeld des Frauenbundes untersucht, in erster Linie Jahresberichte sowie Abhandlungen zur Vereinsgeschichte. Der Frauenbund wurde als direkte Antwort auf die Revolution von 1905 noch in demselben Jahr gegründet. Als Folge der revolutionären Ereignisse wurden Frauen stärker öffentlich aktiv. Der Frauenbund strebte nach einer Bewahrung und Festigung des deutschbaltischen “Volkstums” durch soziale und kulturelle Arbeit. Er verfügte, so könnte man sagen, über eine Doppelnatur. Seine Mitglieder beteiligten sich am „nationalen Aktivismus“, d.h. an der Bewahrung des Deutschtums, aber auch an emanzipatorischen Aktivitäten, d.h. an der Förderung der Frauenrechte in Bildung und Beruf wie auch bis zu einem gewissen Grad an der Überwindung von Klassen- und ethnischen Barrieren. Der Bund war keine politische Organisation, aber in einem bestimmten Fall betätigte er sich ausdrücklich politisch: 1917 bat der Bund, zusammen mit anderen Organisationen, die deutsche Kaiserin in einer Petition um die Eingliederung der drei baltischen Provinzen in den deutschen Staat. Zwar hat der Frauenbund die Gründung eines unabhängigen und demokratischen Lettlands nicht gerade unterstützt, doch als dieser Staat dann existierte, bereitete es den Mitgliedern des Frauenbundes kein wirkliches Problem, mit anderen nationalen Organisationen, z.B. mit denen der lettischen Frauen, zusammenzuarbeiten. Die meisten Aktivitäten des Frauenbundes richteten sich an Deutschbalten. Aber es gibt auch Beispiele für die Zusammenarbeit mit lettischen Organisationen in der Zwischenkriegszeit. Der Frauenbund bemühte sich auch darum, Klassen- und soziale Barrieren innerhalb der deutschbaltischen Gemeinschaft zu überbrücken, und trug so zu einer gewissen inneren Demokratisierung bei. Er bezeichnete sich selbst nicht als feministisch, unterstützte aber die sozialen, politischen und wirtschaftlichen Rechte der Frau, wenn auch manchmal, insbesondere hinsichtlich der politischen Rechte, nur sehr diskret. Mit manchen dieser Aktivitäten setzte sich der Bund für eine aktivere Rolle der Frauen in der Gesellschaft ein. Außerdem trug er dazu bei, das häusliche Leben, also die weibliche Sphäre, besser sichtbar zu machen und auf diese Weise aufzuwerten. Die Tatsache, dass der Frauenbund bisweilen recht undemokratisch agierte (insbesondere bei der Petition von 1917), berechtigt nicht dazu, ihn nicht als Teil der Frauenbewegung zu betrachten. Feminismus bzw. Frauenbewegungen korrelieren nicht automatisch mit demokratischen Werten. In jedem Fall förderte der Deutsche Frauenbund zu Riga in gewisser Weise die Frauenrechte und zeigte außerdem der Welt, und den Männern, dass Frauen zu vielem imstande waren.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christina Douglas

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Democratization through Social Activism. Bucharest : Tritonic, 2015. 235-264.

In this paper I show the development of the environmental protection movement in Poland and its influence on the process of democratization that occurred in the 1980s. I present the social and political landscape of Poland of the 1980s, focusing on the dynamics within the dissident sector. I shall later describe briefly the few most important campaigns of those times and present the actors that took part in them. In the second part of the paper I will analyze the input of the environmental movement for the democratization process of Poland and on the development of the NGO sector and grassroots social activism. The environmental movement in Poland managed to mobilize different cohorts of the society compared to the mainstream opposition, introduced novel repertoire of contention and brought issues that were not within the mainstream public discourse. In the last part of the paper I argue that the continuity of the environmental movement in Poland and its influence on the democratic consolidation after 1989. In the paper I focus mostly on the radical strain of the environmental movement in Poland that is under-researched within the transitional and social movement literature and that seemed to set the tone for the whole sector in terms of agenda and repertoires of action.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Grzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Global Ethics 2015, 11 (2): 143-146.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Katarina FribergNorbert Götz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2015, 8 (1-2): 34-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia MalitskaOlena PodolianYuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

School of Social Sciences

History

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2015, VIII (1-2): 19-32.

Two distinct cases of kin-state relations are examined: that of Russians living in states neighboring Russia and that of Magyars living in states around Hungary. The role of kin-state relations in Europe is studied from a historical perspective and, with reference to Rogers Brubaker's concept of a triadic nexus between nationalizing states, a national minority, and an external homeland. It is argued that the fall of communism – and the fall of several multi-ethnic federations, in particular – revived old territorial conflicts and hostility among national groups both within and between states. The question of kin-state relations is put at the forefront of European minority issues.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kjetil Duvold


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Boundaries Revisited. Berlin : Logos Verlag Berlin, 2015. 41-55.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

In this paper we take the current global financial crisis as a point of departure for a comparative and longitudinal study of such crises in Sweden during the last 100 years. A focus of our attention is how the state (or entities close to the state) chooses to manage the financial crises and thus how they distribute the direct and indirect costs connected to these crises, i.e. how the state in attempting to resolve crises effectively also helps pick the winners and losers of these recurring phenomena. However, this is only a pilot study of a new research project and here we will focus on how Scandinavian countries have dealt with financial crises, and particular how the state have acted in connections with financial crises.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michael Rafferty

Mikael Lönnborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

ENTER forum

School of Social Sciences

Business Administration


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Global and Planetary Change 2015, 134 (SI): 67-81.

A sediment sequence was taken from a closed, high altitude lake (informal name Olive-backed Lake) in the central mountain range of Kamchatka, in the Russian Far East. The sequence was dated by radiocarbon and tephrochronology and used for multi-proxy analyses (chironomids, pollen, diatoms). Although the evolution of Beringian climate through the Holocene is primarily driven by global forcing mechanisms, regional controls, such as volcanic activity or vegetation dynamics, lead to a spatial heterogeneous response. This study aims to reconstruct past changes in the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and to separate the climate-driven response from a response to regional or localised environmental change. Radiocarbon dates from plant macrophytes gave a basal date of 7800 cal yr BP. Coring terminated in a tephra layer, so sedimentation at the lake started prior to this date, possibly in the early Holocene following local glacier retreat. Initially the catchment vegetation was dominated by Betula and Alnus woodland with a mosaic of open, wet, aquatic and semi-aquatic habitats. Between 7800 and 6000 cal yr BP the diatom-inferred lake water was pH 4.4 -5.3 and chironomid and diatom assemblages in the lake were initially dominated by a small number of acidophilic/acid tolerant taxa. The frequency of Pinus pumila (Siberian dwarf pine) pollen increased from 5000 cal yr BP and threshold analysis indicates that P. pumila arrived in the catchment between 4200 and 3000 cal yr BP. Its range expansion was probably mediated by strengthening of the Aleutian Low pressure system and increased winter snowfall. The diatom-inferred pH reconstructions show that after an initial period of low pH, pH gradually increased from 5500 cal yr BP to pH 5.8 at 1500 cal yr BP. This trend of increasing pH through the Holocene is unusual in lake records, but the initially low pH may have resulted directly or indirectly from intense regional volcanic activity during the mid-Holocene. The chironomid-inferred July temperature reconstruction suggests cool periods between 3200 – 2800 cal yr BP and 1100 – 700 cal yr BP and a warmer period between 2800 and 1100 cal yr BP. Chironomid and diatom DCA scores decline from ca. 6000 cal yr BP, indicating compositional changes in these aquatic assemblages. In comparison declines in pollen PCA scores are delayed, starting ca. 5100 cal yr BP. The results suggest that while catchment vegetation was responding primarily to climate change, the biota within the lake and lake water chemistry were responding to localised environmental conditions.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Angela E. Self

Elinor Andren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review 2015, 42 (1): 5-38.

The article examines how informal networks inside the Russian state influenced the formation and further development of the country' s financial markets during the 1990s and 2000s. The main argument is that the activities of these networks made it difficult to implement any coherent state regulation policy in the field. At the same time, rivalry between competing informal networks and different organizations contributed to institutional development and some improvements. The result was a dualist institutional structure of the Russian speculative financial markets that reproduced itself throughout the period in question. The study is based on in-depth interviews conducted at Moscow-based financial institutions.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ilja Viktorov

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Hormones and Behavior 2015, 73 : 30-38.

Exposure to estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EDCs) during of development affects fertility, reproductive and non-reproductive behavior in mammals and fish. These effects can also be transferred to coming generations. In fish, the effects of developmental EDC exposure on non-reproductive behavior is less well studied. Here, we analyze the effects of 17α-Ethinylestradiol (EE2) on anxiety, shoaling behavior and fertility in zebrafish after developmental treatment and remediation in clean water until adulthood. Zebrafish embryos were exposed from day 1 to day 80 post fertilization to actual concentrations of 1.2 and 1.6ng/L EE2. After remediation for 82days non-reproductive behavior and fertilization success were analyzed in both sexes. Males and females from the 1.2ng/L group, as well as control males and females, were bred, and behavior of the untreated F1 offspring was tested as adults. Developmental treatment with 1.2 and 1.6ng/L EE2 significantly increased anxiety in the Novel Tank test and increased shoaling intensity in both sexes. Fertilization success was significantly reduced by EE2 in both sexes when mated with untreated fish of opposite sex. Progeny of fish treated with 1.2ng/L EE2 showed increased anxiety in the Novel tank test and increased light avoidance in the Scototaxis test compared to control offspring. In conclusion, developmental exposure of zebrafish to low doses of EE2 resulted in persistent changes in behavior and fertility. The behavior of unexposed progeny were affected by their parents' exposure, which might suggest transgenerational effects.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Inger Porsch-Hällström

Kristina Volkova

Nasim Reyhanian Caspillo

Patrik Dinnétz

Stefan Hallgren

Tove Porseryd

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Biology

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: On conference website. : .

This paper explores gendering in political journalism – the perceived imprint of gender on the media portrayal of politics and politicians, as well as the processes whereby gendered media representations materialize. Gendering here is understood as an ambiguous process, which can be either discriminatory or promoting, depending on its manifestations (e.g. gender stereotypes or counter-stereotypes, gender-spotlighting or gender-aware story). Moreover, this paper suggests to study this phenomena from intersectionality perspective (Davis 2008, McCall 2005) in order to understand gendering in the framework of other discriminatory and promoting mechanisms in political news.The paper is based on forty semi-structured interviews with political journalists working for the quality press in Russia and Sweden. The choice of the countries is driven by the wish to explore the difficulties and similarities of the journalists’ conceptualizations of gendering in two very different political and cultural contexts. The paper shows that the journalists in both countries highlight the importance of not only gender mainstreaming, but diversity in the content in general as a democratic value, where gender stands in the same row with other difference-making categories (such as ethnicity, sexuality etc.). The paper highlights the difficulties and contradictions the Russian and Swedish political journalists face trying to achieve their diversity ideal. As such, the paper discusses the reasons for the “double othering” of foreign women politicians in the Russian press and the ridiculing of Russian male politicians in the Swedish press, the attempts of the Russian journalists to remain gender-neutral in the current homophobic context and their Swedish colleagues’ striving for keeping gender as an issue on the media agenda when it is being replaced from the political agenda by the discussions of race and ethnicity issues.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

International Review of Sociology 2015, 25 (2): 235-251.

The geopolitical history of religion in the Baltic Sea area shows a development from the time of the Lutheran Reformation of a mosaic of states with very different jurisdictions of creed, from the tolerance under local containment of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth to the strict Evangelical mono-religion of the Scandinavian countries. With seventeenth-century mercantilism, groups of skilled people of ‘foreign’ religion were invited to newly founded towns and ironworks in order to promote the economy. In the eighteenth-century enlightened absolute monarchs, defying both church and bourgeoisie, allowed groups of Catholics and Jews to Scandinavia under spatial restrictions on settlement. In Russia non-Russians of different religions were tolerated, while dissidents to the Orthodox Church were deported to peripheral places. With the Prussian territorial expansion in Germany, more groups were included into citizenship, including Jews. The last states to include groups of ‘foreign’ creed were the early nineteenth century semi-independent states of Norway and Finland.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Mediers känsla för kön. Göteborg : Nordicom, 2015. 155-170.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sofia JohanssonAnn Werner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Gender Studies

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Global and Planetary Change 2015, 134 (SI): 91-100.

Holocene records of cellulose-inferred lake-water δ18O were produced from two lake-sediment sequences obtained in central and northern Kamchatka, Russian Far East. The sediment records share similar fluctuations in δ18O during the interval of ca. 5000-800calyr BP that correspond (inversely) with changes in K+ content of the GISP2 ice-core record from Greenland, a proxy for the relative strength of the Siberian High, suggesting control by climate-related variability in δ18O of regional precipitation. The dramatic expansion of Siberian dwarf pine (Pinus pumila) in northern and central Kamchatka between ca. 5000 and 4000calyr BP, as inferred from pollen records from the same and neighbouring sites, appears to have occurred at a time of progressively declining δ18O of precipitation. This development is interpreted as reflecting a regional cooling trend accompanied by increasing winter snowfall related to gradual intensification of the Siberian High from ca. 5000 to ca. 3000calyr BP. A thicker and more long-lasting snow cover can be assumed to have favoured P. pumila by providing a competitive advantage over other boreal and subalpine tree and shrub species in the region during the later part of the Holocene. These results, which are the first of their kind from Kamchatka, provide novel insight into the Holocene vegetational and climatic development in easternmost Asia, as well as long-term atmospheric circulation dynamics in Beringia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

D. Hammarlund

Elinor Andren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Crossings and Crosses. Boston / Berlin : Walter de Gruyter, 2015. 85-104.

In religious education we can distinguish between different models what resemble also countries’ geo-political, religious and educational tradition. Estonia situates in the crossroads of east and west and its turbulent history has influenced also its religious education (RE). During last hundred years political and religious landscape of the country has altered, also RE in schools has undergone several cataclysms. How could RE in today’s Estonia be classified?The article explores the historical developments in religious landscape of Estonia by outlining its most significant changes in last hundred years and focusing more on religious outlook of Estonian people today. The fourth wave of European Values Study (2008-2009) provides comparative data for Nordic countries (Finland, Sweden, Norway), Estonia and its neighbours with shared past from south and east (Russia, Latvia and Lithuania).Estonian tradition of RE will be explored in its historical context. Then the changes in the concepts, aims and contents of RE during the last 23 years will be investigated by analysing RE syllabi of 1997 and 2010 and changes in the legislation. The results answer the question, is there shift from post-socialist model of RE to Nordic one in Estonian RE?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Olga Schihalejev

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Sustainability 2015, 11 (1): 21-31.

Departing from previous theoretical and empirical studies on sustainable supply-chain management, we investigate organizational commitment (drivers and motivations) and capabilities (resources, structures, and policy instruments) in sustainable procurement of “noncore” products. By focusing on chemicals in textiles, the article explores the activi-ties of differently sized organizations and discusses the potentials and limitations of sustainable procurement measures. The study is based on a qualitative and comparative approach, with empirical findings from 26 case stud-ies of Swedish public and private procurement organizations. These organizations operate in the sectors of hotels/ conference venues, transport, cinema, interior design, and hospitals/daycare. While this work demonstrates major challenges for buyers to take into account peripheral items in sustainable procurement, it also identifies constructive measures for moving forward. A general sustainability/environmental focus can, as an effect, spill over to areas per-ceived as peripheral. © 2014 Boström et al.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Maria Jönsson

Eva Hedenström

Michael Gilek

Magnus Boström


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Dis-orientations. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015. 187-218.

A comparative reading of Walter Benjamin's linguistic theology and Sören Kirkegaard's theory of the revolutionary age.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The vernaculars of Communism. London : Routledge, 2015. 63-88.

Aesopian language (or Aesopian speech) is an important component of Soviet language culture, a cultureof expression under surveillance and censorhip that invented various modes of the  circumlocution and euphemization of politically sensitive topics. In this chapter, I am illustrating some of the innumerable ways of organizing communcation under the sign of (sometimes imagined) prosecution. I am describing various practices of Aesopian circumlocution and summarizing theoretical work in Soviet literary history that addressed this peculiar phenomenon in Russian and Soviet literary tradition. I am also discussing the aesthetics and politics of Aesopian language and its role as a means of expressing political dissent as this was seen by its practitioners inside the USSR and by the theorists who worked with the matters of language and power in the West.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Culture and Education

Philosophy


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Water governance worldwide is going through a shift towards more holistic and participatory approaches. In Europe, the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) adopted in 2000, aims at protecting surface water and groundwater. The WFD emphasizes the importance of stakeholder participation in planning and implementation of the directive, and in order to reach environmental objectives. However, the empirical findings are insufficient regarding how stakeholder participation can lead to improved decisions and implemented plans. In Sweden, a major water quality problem is eutrophication caused to a large extend by diffuse nutrient leakage from agriculture. Therefore, it is important to involve farmers in water management, since their participation can lead the commitment of mitigation measures for reduced nutrient leakage. The overall aim of this study is to contribute the knowledge and understanding of active stakeholder participation in water management, in particular how it can lead to implementation of water quality objectives. The thesis addresses stakeholder participation in eutrophication management in local Swedish catchments, with a particular focus on farmers’ participation in the commitment of mitigation measures. The results are based on case study research, involving four catchment areas in Sweden with severe eutrophication problems. The thesis identified socio-demographic factors, farmers’ knowledge, and the level of existing information and economic support for wetland creation, as factors affecting farmers’ willingness to participate in wetland creation to mitigate nutrient leakage. In the local catchment groups studied, farmers and other local stakeholders participated to discuss potential mitigation activities. In these, farmers emphasized other emitting actors’ responsibility and commitment in local action plans. Where this was realized, social capital within the group increased and led to further collaboration. The thesis also analyzed large-scale wetland programmes at catchment scale, where the organizational and institutional arrangements were central to realize farmers’ participation: inter-municipal agreements entailed sufficient resources, the organization involved the most relevant actors; and leadership resources were important. The thesis argues that organizing water management at a catchment level can be important to cope with challenges related to stake-holder participation for mitigating diffuse nutrient leakage. In particular for dissemination and collection of information, suggesting potential measures for all concerned actors, provide resources needed to realize actions, and to build trust and collaboration. The thesis also emphasized that stakeholder participation has to be underpinned by a genuine meaning, both for the initiators and the participants.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Berit Balfors

Frida Franzén


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2015. (Working Paper ; 2015:1)

The literature on governance of socio-ecological systems has been growing fast during the last one or two decades. However, sound theoretical underpinnings to these systems have not been sufficiently articulated and tied to existing theory, it is argued in this working paper. To address this shortcoming, this paper aims to elaborate on how the theoretical constructs  problem structure, collective choice theory and adaptive governance can be brought together to form a coherent analytical framework for analyzing trans-boundary environmental problems in marine settings. The argument that collective action problematiques may inhibit successful adaptation to environmental change among sovereign states is fundamental to this model. Given that governments tend to prefer national coping strategies where expected national rather than joint benefits are maximized, mutually beneficial cooperation often does not evolve and regional adaptation turn out piecemeal. It is concluded that in order to improve trans-national environmental governance, a better understanding of underlying drivers and countries’ incentives to take action is a necessary prerequisite.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Björn Hassler

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Comparative European Politics 2015, 13 (3): 345-375.

In this article, we use a new data set describing governments, political parties and institutions to make an explicit comparison between Western Europe (WE) and Central Eastern Europe (CEE) in the investigation of three different topical issues found in the coalition literature, namely, coalition formation (that is, which factors affect who forms the winning coalitions), the number of cabinet members (that is, what affects the number of ministers in a cabinet) and cabinet duration (that is, which factors affect how long a new government lasts). Our findings indicate that, regardless of all the discussions about how CEE is different from WE because of the post-communist heritage or the volatility of voters in the CEE region, structural attributes such as the size and number of political parties are important determinants of coalition formation and cabinet duration patterns in both the West and the East. In fact, precisely because of the unsettled nature of CEE party politics, structural attributes tend to matter even more in the East.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Svante Ersson

Torbjörn Bergman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Crossings and Crosses. : Walter de Gruyter, 2015. 191-211.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Crossings and Crosses. : Walter de Gruyter, 2015. 171-190.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2015, VIII (1-2): 105-106.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2015.

Since the 1990s, there have been striking changes in racial ideas, practices, exclusions and violence in Russia. By showing how the processes of globalization and racialization are interrelated, Zakharov seeks to demonstrate and explore the roles these play in Russia's new nationhood project. The book employs a new threefold theoretical elaboration of racialization, examining the process in terms of 'making', 'doing', and finally 'becoming'. These three elements are considered through discussions of a wide variety of aspects of Russian identity and nationalism, from the analysis of subcultures to explorations of nation-building. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nikolay Zakharov

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Environmental Politics 2015, 24 (5): 762-787.

Previous studies of environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGO) have primarily taken place within a nation-state perspective without considering multiple levels of politics and governance. Because environmental problems are usually cross-border phenomena, environmental movements must develop transnational features to play constructive roles in politics and governance. This study contributes to the theorizing and study of transnationalization of ENGOs by illuminating the different regional conditions for this process. The conditions for ENGOs to develop transnational collaboration are explored by comparing ENGOs from six countries in two macro-regions: Sweden, Germany, and Poland in the Baltic Sea region, and Italy, Slovenia, and Croatia in the Adriatic-Ionian Sea region. Grounded in the literatures on social movement theory and ENGO transnationalization, the study identifies how different national, macro-regional, and European institutional structures shape the conditions under which ENGOs develop cross-border collaborations, and demonstrate the importance of long-term and dynamic interplay between processes that occur at the domestic and transnational levels.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Linn Rabe

Magnus Boström

Romina Rodela

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Girlhood Studies 2015, 8 (1): 76-92.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yulia Gradskova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2015, 1-2 : 69-74.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yulia Gradskova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Pittsburgh : University of Pittsburgh Press, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sergei Glebov

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Between Europe and Asia. Pittsburgh : University of Pittsburgh Press, 2015. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Antiziganism. Newcastle : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015. 61-63.

Deals with the politics of compensation for Nazi war crimes against Sinti and Roma

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Nordisk Østforum 2015, 29 (1): 33-56.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Nordström

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Nationalities Papers 2015, 43 (6): 840-865.

The striking affinities that have developed between radical-conservative movements in Western Europe and Russia since the end of the Cold War have been widely noted. This essay considers these affinities through the example of the Soviet historian and geographer Lev Nikolaevich Gumilev (1912–1992). It argues that Gumilev and the European New Right developed perspectives that were highly comparable, founded on similar principles, and articulated through similar images and allusions. Yet despite the powerful resonances in terms of basic concepts and theoretical orientation, there were nonetheless deep differences in terms of the conclusions regarding the practical implications for their respective societies that Gumilev and the Europeans deduced from these principles.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History of Ideas


Research area for doctoral studies

-

YMER 2015, 135 : 7-22.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Patricia Jonason

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Public Law


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Multilevel Governance – from local communities to a true European community. Wien : Klein Publishing, 2015. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Patricia Jonason

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Public Law


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

This thesis aims at contributing to a critical discussion on the supposedly far-reaching secularity of Sweden on the one hand, and on the incongruence and inconsistency of lived religion on the other. At the center are people referred to as semi-secular Swedes – a group that is often neglected in the study of religion. These people do not go to church or get involved in any other alternative organized spiritual activities, neither are they actively opposed to religion or entirely indifferent to it. Most of them describe the ways they are – or are not – religious as in line with the majority patterns in Swedish society.The study is qualitative in method and the material has been gathered through interviews and a questionnaire. It offers a close reading of 28 semi-secular Swedes’ ways of talking about and relating to religion, particularly in reference to their everyday lives and their own experiences, and it analyzes the material with a focus on incongruences.By exploring how the term religion is employed vernacularly by the respondents, the study pinpoints one particular feature in the material, namely simultaneity. The concept of simultaneity is descriptive and puts emphasis on a ‘both and’ approach in (1) the way the respondents ascribe meaning to the term religion, (2) how they talk about themselves in relation to different religious designations, and (3) how they interpret experiences that they single out as ‘out-of-the-ordinary’. These simultaneities are explained and theorized through analyses focusing on intersubjective and discursive processes.In relation to theorizing on religion and religious people this study offers empirical material that nuance a dichotomous understanding of ‘the religious’ and ‘the secular’. In relation to methodology it is argued that the salience of simultaneity in the material shows that when patterns of religiosity among semi-secular Swedes are studied there is a need to be attentive to expressions of complexity, contradiction and incongruity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Thurfjell

Ann af Burén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Comparative Religion


Research area for doctoral studies

-

City 2015, 19 (2-3): 274-296.

Squatting, or the use of property without the legal permission, and tenants’ activism are under-researched areas, in particular in the post-socialist context. Poland has been pointed out as extraordinary on the map of squatting in post-socialist Europe and a considerable number of tenants’ organizations are active in the country. What is most interesting is that squatters’ and tenants’ activists are forming alliances, despite their obvious differences in their organizational models, social composition, along with the specific motives and goals of their activism. The objective of this article is to examine the relations between the tenants’ and squatting movements in Poland by studying two cities where both movements are established and closely cooperating. In particular we are interested in the transformative power of such cooperation and we assume that cooperation between social movements results in negotiations and transformations of the social movement actors involved. The empirical foundations for this article are 50 interviews, whereof 30 interviews conducted in Warsaw with squatters and tenants’ movement activists and 20 interviews conducted with activists in Poznań. Warsaw and Poznań are, moreover, two Polish cities where the squatting movement is most vibrant and where squatters and tenants have achieved some considerable successes in their activities. The article argues against previous studies emphasizing access to abundant resources and identity alignment as crucial for the mobilization of collective and collaborative action. Instead, it argues that the lack of resources might also be driving social movements towards cooperation, as a kind of compensation. Moreover, our cases demonstrate that ideology and identity alignment in social movements create stagnation with regard to openness towards new allies. We therefore argue that a high degree of identity alignment and ideological consistency might discourage the formation of new alliances.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika PolanskaGrzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Environmental Politics 2015, 24 (2): 337-341.

The parliamentary election of 14 September 2014 induced decidedly mixed feelings in the Swedish Green Party (Miljöpartiet de gröna). It led to the ejection of the centre-right government and the installation, for the first time, of Green cabinet ministers. However, the party also experienced a small but unexpected loss of votes compared to its score in the previous election. Moreover, partly because a far-right party built impressively on its breakthrough into the national parliament in 2010, the new government rests on a precariously narrow parliamentary base.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Niklas Bolin

Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Media History 2015, 21 (2): 178-191.

This article explores the relationship between historicality and historiography, with particular focus on the tension between claims of the historicality of broadcast events and later absences in broadcast historiography. It analyses two types of claims of historicality: first as a provider of images of history in the making; and second, as a kind of prototype, a forerunner of a new era in which television has a central position in a global society. Looking at the production and organization of the broadcast of Yuri Gagarin's return to Moscow in April 1961, the article argues that historiography is often too bound up in the present and remains blind to perspectives falling outside the dominant narratives of the current. The claims of being forerunners, on behalf of the agents involved in producing the broadcast, fit poorly with later historical events and are perhaps nothing more than the ruins of an anticipated future. But as such it may teach us just as much about the forgotten aspects of television history as it does about our practices of writing it.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Lundgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: 2015 Program The Society for Personality and Social psychology 16th Annual Convention. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Girts Dimdins

Henry Montgomery

Maria Sandgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Psychology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: 2015 Program The Society for Personality and Social psychology 16th Annual Convention. : .

Fifty-one university college students were presented with 10 political proposals, recently advanced in Sweden. For each participant, each of the 10 proposals  was described as being implemented in the near future and in a more distant future. The participants were asked to judge the proposals in terms of their favorability, desirability, and feasibility. In line with Construal Level Theory (CLT, Trope & Liberman, 2010), it was found that feasibility better predicted favorability of close future proposals (as compared to temporally distant proposals) whereas the opposite pattern was found for desirability.  Also in line with CLT, correlational data suggested that participants to a larger extent as compared to the near future tailored their representations of the distant future such that feasibility co-varied positively with the desirability of a proposal, suggesting an optimism bias. Presumably, this was possible because feasibility is less concrete and more malleable for more distant events.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Girts Dimdins

Henry Montgomery

Maria Sandgren

Philip Gustafsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Psychology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

This thesis studies different aspects of reproductive behaviour on the international, national, and local levels in post-communist countries. The main focus is Ukraine, where fertility rates are very low and the population is in severe decline. The studies contribute new knowledge about the applicability of a family policy typology developed on the basis of Western countries’ experience for post-communist countries, and about the influence of family policies on fertility levels in these countries. Moreover, the studies investigate whether and how macro-level influences impact on individuals’ reproductive behaviour. Four articles are included in the thesis:Family policies in Ukraine and Russia in comparative perspective analyses the institutional set-up of family policies in both countries and compares the findings to 31 other countries. The results show that Ukrainian family policies support a male-breadwinner type of family, while the benefit levels of Russian family policies are low, compelling families to rely on relatives or the childcare market.Family policies and fertility - Examining the link between family policy institutions and fertility rates in 33 countries 1995-2010 comparatively explores whether family policies have an effect on fertility rates across the case-countries. Pooled time-series regression analysis demonstrates that gender-egalitarian family policies are connected to higher fertility rates, but that this effect is smaller at higher rates of female labour force participation.To have or not to have a child? Perceived constraints on childbearing in a lowest-low fertility context investigates the influence of the perception of postmodern values, childcare availability and environmental pollution on individuals’ fertility intentions in a city in Eastern Ukraine. It is shown that women who already have a child perceive environmental pollution as a constraint on their fertility intentions.Prevalence and correlates of the use of contraceptive methods by women in Ukraine in 1999 and 2007 examines changes in the prevalence and the correlates of the use of contraceptive methods. The use of modern contraceptive methods increased during the period and the use of traditional methods decreased, while the overall prevalence did not change. Higher exposure to messages about family planning in the media is correlated with the use of modern contraceptive methods.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen

Katharina Wesolowski


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Drug And Alcohol Dependence 2015, 150 : 105-111.

BACKGROUND: Despite evidence that many people engage in solitary drinking and that it might be associated with negative consequences, to date, little research has focused on this form of drinking behaviour. This study examined the prevalence and factors associated with solitary drinking, and assessed whether it is linked with hazardous alcohol use among males in nine countries of the former Soviet Union (fSU).METHODS: Data came from a cross-sectional population-based survey undertaken in 2010/11 in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, and Ukraine. Information was obtained on the frequency of solitary drinking among male regular drinkers (i.e., those consuming alcoholic drinks at least once a month), and on problem drinking (CAGE) and heavy episodic drinking (HED). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between the variables.RESULTS: The prevalence of occasional and frequent solitary drinking ranged from 8.4% (Georgia) to 42.4% (Azerbaijan), and 3.1% (Kazakhstan) to 8.2% (Armenia), respectively. Solitary drinking was associated with being older, divorced/widowed, living alone, having a bad/very bad household financial situation, lower levels of social support, and poor self-rated health. Occasional solitary drinking was linked to problem drinking and HED, while frequent solitary alcohol use was related to problem drinking.CONCLUSIONS: Solitary drinking is relatively common among male regular drinkers in the fSU and is linked to older age, social and economic disadvantage, and hazardous alcohol use.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ai Koyanagi

Andrew Stickley


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

This paper examines the affective landscapes of Poland, Canada, and the US in Eva Hoffman’s autobiographical account of her immigrant/exilic life in Lost in Translation (1989). Hoffman’s reputation as a writer and intellectual was launched with this autobiography. Hoffman left Poland for Vancouver with her Jewish family in 1959, when she was 13, and lived there until college in the US, where she made her career. She lives today primarily in London. Hoffman’s autobiography is divided into three parts, dealing first with Poland, then Canada, then the US. Hoffman's text explicitly thematizes nostalgia. Hoffman affirms her nostalgia for her Polish childhood with a postmodern awareness. Though Lost in Translation has been celebrated for its self-reflexivity and its treatment of the links between language and subjectivity, some scholars have been highly critical of the “nostalgic” view of Poland. Hoffman's work is clearly invested in the dynamics and the affect of remembering and forgetting particular times and particular places. In this paper, I examine Hoffman's understandings of nostalgia, and of the affective landscapes with which she engages. Poland, Canada, and the US have powerful associations, but I focus on primarily on Poland and Canada, emphasizing the overlooked importance of Hoffman's Canadian years.  I am particularly interested in exploring how affect—defined roughly as “something that moves, that triggers reactions, forces, or intensities . . ., simultaneously engaging the mind and body, reason and emotions” (Berberich, Campbell and Hudson 314), and including the affect of nostalgia—is represented and textually communicated with readers. Thus, I look at the effects of Hoffman’s privileging of lyricism as a mode and mood for life-writing.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liz Kella

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

English


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Public Health 2015, 29 (4): 403-410.

OBJECTIVES: To examine which factors are associated with feeling lonely in Moscow, Russia, and to determine whether loneliness is associated with worse health.STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.METHODS: Data from 1190 participants were drawn from the Moscow Health Survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine which factors were associated with feeling lonely and whether loneliness was linked to poor health.RESULTS: Almost 10% of the participants reported that they often felt lonely. Divorced and widowed individuals were significantly more likely to feel lonely, while not living alone and having greater social support reduced the risk of loneliness. Participants who felt lonely were more likely to have poor self-rated health (odds ratio [OR]: 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.38-3.76), and have suffered from insomnia (OR: 2.43; CI: 1.56-3.77) and mental ill health (OR: 2.93; CI: 1.88-4.56).CONCLUSIONS: Feeling lonely is linked to poorer health in Moscow. More research is now needed on loneliness and the way it affects health in Eastern Europe, so that appropriate interventions can be designed and implemented to reduce loneliness and its harmful impact on population well-being in this setting.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ai Koyanagi

Andrew Stickley

Mall LeinsaluSara Ferlander

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Today, individuals can relatively easily meet and communicate with each other over great distances due to increased mobility and advances in communication technology. This also allows intimate relationships to be maintained over large geographical distances. Despite these developments, long-distance relationships (LDRs), i.e. intimate relationships maintained over geographical distance, remain understudied. The present thesis aims to fill this knowledge gap and investigates how intimate partners who live so far away from each other that they cannot meet every day make their relationship ongoing beyond face-to-face interaction.Theoretically, this study departs from a symbolic interactionist viewpoint that invites us to study phenomena from the actor’s perspective. Conceptually, the thesis builds on the recent development in sociology of intimate lives that sees intimacy as a relational quality that has to be worked on to be sustained, and that focuses on the practices that make a relationship a relationship. Empirically, the thesis is based upon 19 in-depth interviews with individuals from Latvia with long-distance relationship experience.The thesis consists of four articles. Article I studies the context in which LDRs in Latvia are maintained, focusing on the normative constraints that complicate LDR maintenance. Article II analyses how intimacy is practiced over geographical distance. Article III examines how long-distance partners manage the experience of the time they are together and the time they are geographically apart. Article IV explores the aspect of idealization in LDRs. Overall, the thesis argues for the critical role of imagination in relationship maintenance. The relationship maintenance strategies identified within the articles are imagination-based mediated communication (creating sensual/embodied intimacy, emotional intimacy, daily intimacy and imagined individual intimacy); time-work strategies that enable long-distance partners to deal with the spatiotemporal borders of the time together and the time apart; and creating bi-directional idealization. The thesis is also one of the few works in the field of intimate lives in Eastern Europe and analyses the normative complications that long-distance partners face in their relationship maintenance in Latvia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kerstin Jacobsson

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Alcoholism 2015, 39 (3): 540-547.

BACKGROUND: Binge drinking may be linked to problematic eating behavior, although as yet, little research has been conducted on this association. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between binge drinking and eating problems in Russian adolescents.METHODS: Data were drawn from the Social and Health Assessment, a cross-sectional school-based survey of 6th to 10th grade students (aged 12 to 17 years old) carried out in Arkhangelsk, Russia. Information was collected on various eating problems (worries about weight, feeling fat, excessive eating, fasting and excessive exercise, and purging behaviors) and binge drinking (5 or more drinks in a row). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between binge drinking and eating problems.RESULTS: Among the 2,488 adolescents included in the statistical analysis, nearly 50% of girls expressed worries about their weight, while 35.0 and 41.5% of adolescent boys and girls reported excessive eating, respectively. The prevalence of purging behaviors (vomiting/using laxatives) was, however, much lower among both sexes (females-2.6%; males-3.3%). In a regression model adjusted for demographic factors and depressive symptoms, among girls, binge drinking was associated with 5 of the 6 eating problems with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 1.21 (upset about weight gain) to 1.68 (excessive eating). For boys, binge drinking was linked to feeling overweight (OR: 1.47, confidence interval [CI]: 1.20 to 1.81) and vomiting/used laxatives (OR: 4.13, CI: 1.58 to 10.80).CONCLUSIONS: Many adolescents in Russia report problematic eating attitudes and behaviors, and eating problems are associated with binge drinking. More research is now needed in this setting to better understand adolescent eating problems and their association with alcohol misuse, so that contextually suitable interventions can be implemented to reduce these behaviors and mitigate their potentially detrimental effects.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ai Koyanagi

Andrew Stickley


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Historisk Tidskrift (S) 2015, 135 (1): 63-91.

This article analyzes Swedish–German interactions with focus on Nazi-Germany's methods of infiltrating Swedish–German associations, based on sources in German and Swedish archives. German university teachers in the Deutsche Akademie, and the Deutscher Akademischer Austauchdienst were sent to Sweden as agents by Nazi Germany. Parallel to their work as language teachers they should "secretly conquer the Swedish soul". Because they were obliged to send regular reports from Sweden there is a huge amount of documents in German archives revealing not only Swedish attitudes to Nazism, but also how for example Swedish-German associations became special targets for the infiltration. The analyses reveal differences between the associations: In Göteborg and Uppsala they did not want to cooperate. When John Holmberg, professor of German in Uppsala, criticized the anti-Semitic ideology and rector Curt Weibull in Göteborg defended the university against the Nazi infiltration they were reported to Berlin as dangerous enemies. In Stockholm however speakers as representatives for the Nazi regime were welcomed. One of the invited speakers 1935 was Rudolf Hess who spoke of "The New Germany". After the fall of the Nazi regime there was no self reflection what so ever in the written programs of the Association in Stockholm.One explanation why many in Sweden did not resist the Nazi propaganda was that the Nazis worked under the cloak of traditional German culture and rhetoric. Glorification of the Nordic ideal and traditional values were recommended propaganda tools. The semantic changes of the words were not always observed in Sweden, but documents in German archives show that there were strong critical voices.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Zhurnalistika v 2014 godu: SMI kak faktor obschestvennogo dialoga [Journalism in 2014: Media as a factor of public dialogue], Collection of theses of international scientific and practical conference Journalism 2014, Moscow: MediaMir, Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University. Moscow: MediaMir, Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University : .

Гендер в политической журналистике как вопрос демократии: российские и шведские журналисты о свободе печати и гендерном равенствеВоронова Людмила Александровна, PhD, преподаватель кафедры медиа-исследований университета Седерторн (Стокгольм, Швеция)Гендерные медиа-исследователи часто обсуждают гендерные стереотипы как проблему демократии. Так, Китцингер (Kitzinger 1998) понимает политическую журналистику как «гендер-политику», дискурсивную практику, несущую в себе потенциал как для продвижения демократического идеала гендерного равенства, так и для воспроизведения традиционных стереотипов и утверждения существующей гендерной иерархии. Калламар (Callamard 2006) предлагает считать гендерные стереотипы в СМИ особым видом цензуры, которая, как правило, действует в пользу мужчин, сокращая для женщин возможность быть объективно представленными в медиа-дискурсе. Более того, гендерное равенство, по мнению исследователей, практически рифмуется со свободой печати, причем равенство мужчин и женщин воспринимается ими как «показатель реализации настоящей и зрелой демократии» (Hermes 2013).Проведя интервью с сорока журналистами, работающими в качественных изданиях России и Швеции (интервью проводились в 2011-12 гг.), мы выяснили, что российские и шведские журналисты воспринимают свободу печати и гендерное равенство как непременные атрибуты демократии. Тем не менее, между их представлениями о балансе этих двух идеалов есть существенные различия. Так, российские журналисты находят свободу прессы гораздо более ценным элементом демократии, чем гендерное равенство, и готовы поступиться принципом продвижения последнего, если это необходимо для выполнения роли «сторожевой собаки» власти. Гендерные стереотипы, хоть и идут вразрез с демократическими идеалами качественной прессы, могут становиться одним из инструментов критики политиков. Более того, по мнению российских журналистов, политики могут использовать гендерную повестку для «обуздания» свободной прессы.Шведские журналисты не видят никакого противоречия между идеалами гендерного равенства и свободы печати, считая естественной ситуацию, когда в продвижении гендерного равенства одинаково заинтересованы и качественные издания, и власть, что позволяет им вступать в гармоничный диалог. Хотя шведские журналисты крайне критично настроены по отношению к каким-либо ограничениям относительно контента, вводимым извне, они признают необходимость тщательной проработки внутренних ограничений: так, к примеру, они внимательно прислушиваются к гендерной критике контента, поступающей не только от читателей, но и от политиков.Таким образом, и российские, и шведские журналисты считают гендер в политической журналистике вопросом демократии. Несмотря на бóльшую критичность российских журналистов по отношению к ограничениям свободы печати, их позиция защиты более уязвима, чем позиция их шведских коллег: оправдывая использование гендерных стереотипов в прессе, они поощряют и традиционное представление о гендерной иерархии в обществе, где власть воспринимается как мужчина и доминанта, а пресса как зависимая женщина. Тем не менее, позиция шведских журналистов тоже неоднозначна: воспринимая шведскую политическую и медийную систему как воплощение демократии, они перестают критически воспринимать исчезновение гендерного равенства как темы в журналистской повестке дня – факт, отмечаемый гендерными экспертами и активистами (Rönngren 2014).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Media and Communication Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Shipwrecks around the World. New Delhi : Delta Book World, 2015. 176-192.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Niklas Eriksson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

MARIS

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archaeology


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Europe-Asia Studies 2015, 67 (10): 1547-1570.

This essay examines the prevalence and the correlates of the use of contraceptive methods in Ukraine in 1999 and 2007. Between those years, the overall use of contraceptive methods decreased slightly. However, the use of modern contraceptive methods, and especially the use of condoms, increased considerably, while the use of traditional contraceptive methods decreased. Higher exposure to messages about family planning in the media was correlated with the use of modern contraceptive methods. It is posited that the results suggest that state policies influence individual behaviour in contraception.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katharina Wesolowski


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Routledge Companion to Hermeneutics. London : Routledge, 2015. 550-560.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Studies in Practical Knowledge


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The Routledge Companion to Bioethics. London : Routledge, 2015. 570-580.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Studies in Practical Knowledge


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Governing Europe's Marine Environment. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. 75-92.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Monica Hammer

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Post-Soviet Affairs 2015, 31 (3): 201-223.

Building on data from a survey (n = 4000) conducted in the eastern Ukrainian city of Luhansk in late 2013, this article explores the link between national identity and foreign policy preferences in the Donbas, suggesting that they are increasingly conflated in distinct geopolitical identities. Descriptive statistics and multinomial logistic regression are used to compare the characteristics of pro-West and uncertain individuals with those of the pro-Russian/Soviet individuals, with preferences on North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and European Union (EU) accession underlying this distinction. The results show that geopolitical identities in Luhansk have a complex political stratigraphy that includes demographic, socioeconomic, cultural, and attitudinal components. The pro-West constituency is younger, not Russian but often including members of other ethnic groups, well educated, more tolerant toward sexual minorities, generally more satisfied with life, and it also speaks better English. Conversely, those with pro-Russia/Soviet geopolitical identities are older, Russian, low educated, less fluent in English, intolerant, and unsatisfied with their lives. Uncertainty is more randomly distributed among social groups, indicating different underlying causes related to the source of the respondents’ uncertainty.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michael Gentile


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Sexuality & Culture 2015, 19 (2): 388-406.

Not all couples live together; some partners live far from each other, causing potential challenges to relationship maintenance in terms of keeping the relationship ongoing. In the present study, complications in relationship maintenance experienced by heterosexual long-distance partners in post-Soviet Latvia are analysed. The complications are examined in the light of social norms as conceptualized by Parsons and Shils (Toward a general theory of action. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1962) in their notion of dominant value orientations. The article suggests that the norm conflicts experienced by the long-distance partners are illustrative of the value transitions in societies undergoing rapid social change, such as in Latvia. The analysis is based on 19 in-depth interviews with individuals with long-distance relationship (LDR) experience. The social norms complicating or hindering LDR maintenance were found to be generation-specific and gender-specific. The interviewees born and raised in Soviet Latvia referred to collective-oriented norms while the interviewees born in the independent neo-liberal Latvia referred to their own interests that complicated their LDR maintenance.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Governing Europe’s Marine Environment. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. 141-160.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sebastian Linke

Michael Gilek

Mikael Karlsson

Oksana Udovyk


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Governing Europe’s Marine Environment. Farnham, England : Ashgate, 2015. 1-12.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristine Kern

Michael Gilek

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Innovative Issues and Approaches in Social Sciences 2015, 8 (1): 223-241.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Qualitative Sociology 2015, 38 (2): 185-203.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Governing Europe's Marine Environment. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. 249-264.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Svein Jentoft

Björn HasslerMichael Gilek

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Governing Europe's Marine Environment. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. 163-181.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristine Kern

Björn HasslerSara Söderström

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Parliamentary talk, despite its central place in politics, has not been the focus of many qualitative studies. The present study investigates how parliamentary talk emerges in a dialogue between different arguments in the parliament. At the same time, this is a study of politics, of how human interaction gives birth to laws that regulate life in two contemporary democracies, Slovakia and Poland. It provides a close-reading of two political debates: on the state language in Slovakia and on gender parity in Poland.This study draws on hermeneutic and semiotic thinkers such as Gadamer, Bakhtin and Lotman to elaborate a dialogical understanding of language that can provide the basis for a method of textual analysis. The dialogical understanding of language emphasises that text and talk must be studied in the context of an interaction. The unit of analysis is a pair of utterances, a question and an answer. Until an utterance has been interpreted, it carries only the potential of meaning; its meaning is materialised by the responses it receives.The study further argues that conversation analysis and its tools can usefully be applied to the study of political debate. The method provides for the analysis of the dynamics between micro-scale interaction in the parliament and the macro-scale dynamics of culture. These dynamics assume two different forms that Lotman termed as “translation” and “explosion”.The study shows that parliamentary debate is characterised by a constantly evolving topic of discussion, namely that the meaning of the bill at the start of the debate and at the end of the debate are really two different bills. This is not because the content of the bill has undergone changes, but because in the course of the debate, the bill has generated new cultural connections. Casting a vote in support of the bill does not approve just the bill itself but a whole set of interconnected political, social and cultural values—what Lotman approached as the semiosphere. This study suggests Lotman’s cultural semiotics can provide for “imperfect hermeneutics” that is sensitive to the dynamic and contested nature of tradition in politics whilst acknowledging the inevitability of culture in mediating political talk. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Inga Brandell

Jaakko Turunen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2015.

Gotland, Åland, Saaremaa, Hiiumaa and Bornholm are five island regions in the Baltic Sea which constitute, or have until recently constituted, provinces or counties of their own. Combining perspectives from two disparate academic fields, uses of history and island studies, this book investigates how regional history writing has contributed to the formation of regional identity on these islands since the year 1800. The special geographic situation of the islands-somewhat secluded from the mainland but also connected to important waterways-has provided their inhabitants with shared historical experiences. Due to varying geographic and historical circumstances, the relationship between regional and national identity is however different on each island. While regional history writing has in most cases aimed at integrating the island into the nation state, it has on Åland in the second half of the 20th century been used to portray its inhabitants as a separate nation. Dramatic political upheavals as the World Wars has also caused shifts in how regional history writing has represented the relationship to the mainland nation state, and has sometimes also resulted in altered national loyalties.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Janne Holmén

Samuel Edquist


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Archival Sciences


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nordisk Østforum 2015, 2 : 143-165.

Drawing on cross-national public opinion surveys from the spring of 2014, this article analyses popular support for democracy in the three Baltic states – more specifically the attitudinal differences between the ethnic majorities and the Russian-speaking minorities in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. It assesses the democratic political culture of the three countries 25 years after the fall of communism in Europe, 10 years after EU membership, a few years after the global financial crisis, and in the midst of the recent Russian–Ukrainian crisis. The data demonstrate widespread public dissatisfaction with democracy throughout the region, especially in Latvia, the country hardest hit by the crisis in 2008–2009. As a rule, the Russian-speaking minorities in the three Baltic states tend to be more critical of democracy than ethnic Estonians, Latvians and Lithuanians.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Tobacco Control 2015, 24 (2): 190-197.

BACKGROUND: The US Food and Drug Administration has established a policy of substantially discounting the health benefits of reduced smoking in its evaluation of proposed regulations because of the cost to smokers of the supposed lost pleasure they suffer by no longer smoking. This study used data from nine countries of the former Soviet Union (fSU) to explore this association in a setting characterised by high rates of (male) smoking and smoking-related mortality.METHODS: Data came from a cross-sectional population-based study undertaken in 2010/2011 in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine. Information was collected from 18 000 respondents aged ≥18 on smoking status (never, ex-smoking and current smoking), cessation attempts and nicotine dependence. The association between these variables and self-reported happiness was examined using ordered probit regression analysis.RESULTS: In a pooled country analysis, never smokers and ex-smokers were both significantly happier than current smokers. Smokers with higher levels of nicotine dependence were significantly less happy than those with a low level of dependence.CONCLUSIONS: This study contradicts the idea that smoking is associated with greater happiness. Moreover, of relevance for policy in the fSU countries, given the lack of public knowledge about the detrimental effects of smoking on health but widespread desire to quit reported in recent research, the finding that smoking is associated with lower levels of happiness should be incorporated in future public health efforts to help encourage smokers to quit by highlighting that smoking cessation may result in better physical and emotional health.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ai Koyanagi

Andrew Stickley

Mall Leinsalu

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Foucault Studies 2015, 20 : 76-95.

This article deals with civil society organizations active in the field of family policy and demographic issues in contemporary Russia, using Michel Foucault’s concepts of biopolitics and governmentality. More specifically, so called “daddy-schools” that have emerged in and around Saint Petersburg since 2008, are studied, using interviews and documents. The analysis shows that the organizations work as a complement to the state but have also been able to influence policy, alter legislation and challenge the established assumptions and governmentality of the Russian state concerning parenthood, the “good” father and how to deal with the ongoing demographic crisis and increase fertility.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Geopolitics 2015, 20 (2): 248-266.

This paper looks at how Swedish political scientist Rudolf Kjellén (1864–1922) conceived of the relationship between nature and culture, between material and immaterial power as well as the role of soft power, geopolitical imaginary and competitive identity in off-setting potentially unfavourable geopolitical conditions for small and medium-sized states. It is argued that with regard to small states, Kjellén did not maintain a consistent separation between “soft” cultural resources of power and “hard” laws of nature. Rather, he placed the mutually constitutive tension between geography (nature) and politics (culture) at the centre of his politico-scientific analysis, arguing that active “biopolitics” could supplement geopolitics. In Kjellén’s conception, cultural and natural resources are instruments of an otherwise integrated notion of power which challenges the contemporary separation between hard and soft power.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Medicine, Health care and Philosophy 2015, 18 (2): 267-277.

Whereas empathy is most often looked upon as a virtue and essential skill in contemporary health care, the relationship to sympathy is more complicated. Empathic approaches that lead to emotional arousal on the part of the health care professional and strong feelings for the individual patient run the risk of becoming unprofessional in nature and having the effect of so-called compassion fatigue or burnout. In this paper I want to show that approaches to empathy in health care that attempt to solve these problems by cutting empathy loose from sympathy-from empathic concern-are mistaken. Instead, I argue, a certain kind of sympathy, which I call professional concern, is a necessary ingredient in good health care. Feeling oneself into the experiences and situation of the patient cannot be pursued without caring for the patient in question if the empathy is going to be successful. Sympathy is not only a thing that empathy makes possible and more or less spontaneously provides a way for but is something that we find at work in connection to empathy itself. In the paper I try to show how empathy is a particular form of emotion in which I feel with, about, and for the other person in developing an interpretation of his predicament. The with and for aspects of the empathy process are typically infused by a sympathy for the person one is empathizing with. Sympathy can be modulated into other ways of feeling with and for the person in the empathy process, but these sympathy-replacement feelings nevertheless always display some form of motivating concern for the target. Such an understanding of empathy is of particular importance for health care and other professions dealing with suffering clients.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Svenaeus

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Studies in Practical Knowledge


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

European Journal of Public Health 2015, 25 (2): 216-218.

The recent tobacco excise tax increase and economic crisis reduced cigarette affordability in Ukraine dramatically. Using survey data from Stakhanov (n = 1691), eastern Ukraine, we employed logistic regression analysis to examine whether socio-economic status was associated with the continuation of smoking in this environment in 2009. Low education (in women) and ownership of household assets (in men) were negatively associated with smoking continuation, whereas a positive association was found for personal monthly income. Our findings suggest that in a low-income setting where efficient cessation services are absent, reduced cigarette affordability may have only a limited effect in cutting down smoking.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anton E Kunst

Andrew Stickley

Mall Leinsalu

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

International History Review 2015, 37 (3): 519-539.

The London-based Committee for Relieving the Distressed Inhabitants of Germany, and Other Parts of the Continent is an early example of a large-scale voluntary relief programme that has gone unappreciated in the annals of humanitarianism. The present article examines the period in 1808 and 1809 when this committee redirected its relief efforts to Sweden. The case highlights many issues that beset humanitarianism today. With well-preserved recipient records, it offers insight to aspects of humanitarian encounters that have been markedly under-researched. It examines how foreign-policy interests fostered mis-conceptions about those in need and how such misconceptions resulted in corrupt distribution structures. It shows that asymmetries in the development of civil society impeded the relief effort and that the divergent interests of donors and distributors caused the forms of relief to be inadequate and agency to be lost. Moreover, it illustrates how local elites resisted advice from abroad and how the individual personalities involved shaped policy outcomes. These factors remain issues at the present time and the case of two Protestant European countries with a cultural affinity illustrates how significant they are.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Norbert Götz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Population, Space and Place 2015, 21 (1): 86-101.

The influence of perceived macro-level constraints on childbearing on women’s fertility decision-making on the micro level was analysed in Stakhanov, a city with a shrinking population in Eastern Ukraine. The perceived macro-level constraints employed in the study were related to childcare arrangements, value changes regarding family formation, and pollution of the environment and health concerns. To study the influence of those constraints, logistic regression analyses were conducted whereby first-birth and second-birth intentions were analysed separately. None of the constraints influenced childless women’s first-birth intentions. Instead, sociodemographic factors such as age and civil status appeared as significant predictors. That none of the constraints influenced childless women’s fertility intentions is interpreted to be an indicator of the strong norm of having at least one child in Ukraine.For women with one child, the fact that pollution of the environment and health concerns connected to childbirth were perceived as a constraint on childbearing at the national level was significantly associated with lower second-birth intentions. Women in Ukraine seem to perceive environmental pollution as a constraint on their fertility, possibly influenced by public discourse related to the health consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Moreover, the inhabitants of Stakhanov itself have experienced environmental pollution at close range. Those factors together could explain why environmental pollution and poor health were seen as constraints on childbearing at the national level, and the negative influence these had on second-birth intentions.It is argued that environmental pollution should be considered a factor influencing fertility decision-making. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katharina Wesolowski


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Archives of Suicide Research 2015, 19 (1): 117-130.

Russia has one of the highest suicide mortality rates in the world. This study investigates the development of Russian suicide mortality over a longer time period in order to provide a context within which the contemporary high level might be better understood. Annual sex- and age-specific suicide-mortality data for Russia for the period 1870-2007 were studied, where available. Russian suicide mortality increased 11-fold over the period. Trends in male and female suicide developed similarly, although male suicide rates were consistently much higher. From the 1990s suicide has increased in a relative sense among the young (15-34), while the high suicide mortality among middle-aged males has reduced. Changes in Russian suicide mortality over the study period may be attributable to modernisation processes.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andrew Stickley

Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen

Tanya Jukkala


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

SCOHOST

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ecology and Evolution 2015, 5 (22): 5193-5202.

Tolerance to herbivory is an adaptation that promotes regrowth and maintains fitness in plants after herbivore damage. Here, we hypothesized that the effect of competition on tolerance can be different for different genotypes within a species and we tested how tolerance is affected by competitive regime and damage type. We inflicted apical or leaf damage in siblings of 29 families of an annual plant Raphanus raphanistrum (Brassicaceae) grown at high or low competition. There was a negative correlation of family tolerance levels between competition treatments: plant families with high tolerance to apical damage in the low competition treatment had low tolerance to apical damage in the high competition treatment and vice versa. We found no costs of tolerance, in terms of a trade-off between tolerance to apical and leaf damage or between tolerance and competitive ability, or an allocation cost in terms of reduced fitness of highly tolerant families in the undamaged state. High tolerance bound to a specific competitive regime may entail a cost in terms of low tolerance if competitive regime changes. This could act as a factor maintaining genetic variation for tolerance.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Elin Dahlgren

Kari Lehtilä

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Differentiated Integration in Europe. Brussels : The Centre for European Policy Studies, 2014. 12-25.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Vít Beneš

Mats Braun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Farnham : Ashgate, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mats Braun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Common Market Studies 2014, 52 (3): 445-460.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mats Braun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Spheres of Culture 2014, VIII : 524-538.

The article considers the problems of form and genre structure in the illustrated magazines published in the late 1920s and early 1930s in Germany and Soviet Ukraine. The attention is focused on morphology as a factor and indicator of the ideological situation of the time. The emphasis rests upon both similarities (genre structure, the heteronomy of text and picture) and differences (more vs. less regular architectonics, different levels of standardization, practices of parodying the standard).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Social, Health, and Communication Studies 2014, 1 (1): 62-79.

The place of Europe in post-Cold War national mythologies of different countries varies widely. In three arguably most dramatic examples, Poland rethought itself as “the somehow decentered heart of Catholic Europe” (Dayan & Katz, 1994, p. 166), while Russia gave reasons to conclude it “leaves the West” (Trenin, 2006, p. 87) and Ukraine stuck with its view of Europe as a normative example (Orlova, 2010, p. 26). To what extent does this remain true if one is to look empirically at the discourses that currently inhabit news media? This paper points out, on the example of the public discourses around Euromaidan, to how narratives of Europe are instrumentalized in political discussions in the three countries that followed very different paths since the collapse of the communist bloc. The presentation includes results of qualitative analysis based on an open coding approach; the focus rests on the most prestigious news outlets (Rzeczpospolita, Gazeta wyborcza; Izvestia, Kommersant; Dzerkalo tyzhnia, Korrespondent) but also includes important online blog platforms.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Roman Horbyk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Svenska Dagbladet 2014, 14 september : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann-Cathrine Jungar

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Greifswald : Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marco Nase

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

History


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

RIG 2014, 97 (4): 215-222.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ingvar Svanberg

Madeleine Bonow

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Environmental Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: The Returns of Antigone. Albany : SUNY Press, 2014. 281-297.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Sjöholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Aesthetics


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Models of Democracy in Nordic and Baltic Europe . Farnham : Ashgate, 2014. 1-38.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Models of Democracy in Nordic and Baltic Europe . Farnham : Ashgate, 2014. 117-152.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jānis Ikstens

Emelie Lilliefeldt

Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Models of Democracy in Nordic and Baltic Europe . Farnham : Ashgate, 2014. 219-240.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Stockholm : Carlsson Bokförlag, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ola Holmgren


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Comparative Literature


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Post-Communist Transition and Women's Agency in Eastern Europe. Dordrecht : Republic of Letters Publishing, 2014. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristina Abiala


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutet

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2014, VII (2-3): 27-36.

The specific of Russian media model called as Statist Commercial model is a combination of Western market economy elements with considerable influence from the political elite. It is also characterized by state control of media, lack of legal protection for journalists, restriction of professional journalistic autonomy, and censorship/self-censorship. However, the media market is represented not only by propagandistic national TV channels but also by press disloyal to the Kremlin, indicating a degree of diversity and pluralism.The Russian media is targeting different audiences: the larger group serves the wide audience who passively absorbing the propaganda; the smaller (“liberal”) media group enables a small stratum of intellectuals to let off steam and as a facade of democracy for the worldwide public. Both groups are functioning diachronically, being directly or indirectly managed by the state.The development of social media created new conditions for Russian journalists. LiveJournal is the most popular and relatively non-controlled blog platform in Russia. The core of political/public discourse is mainly held there and potentially can be useful for Russian journalists. This research is based on analysis of 100 journalist’s blogs in the period of the last presidential election 2012; the findings show how they use LiveJournal for professional goals. This paper is discussing to what extend journalists’ blogging works as a compensatory means and a tool for self-expression outside the media companies in conditions of press freedom restriction.  

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elena Johansson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Journalism


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Fashion, Consumption and Everyday Culture in the Soviet Union between 1945 and 1985. Munchen : Verlag Otto Sagner, 2014. 125-134.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yulia Gradskova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

This paper will deal with civil society organizations active in the field of family policy and demographic issues in contemporary Russia, using Michel Foucault’s concepts of biopolitics and governmentality. More specifically, so called “daddy-schools” that have emerged in and around Saint Petersburg since 2008, are studied, using interviews and documents. A preliminary analysis shows that the organizations work as complements to the state but have also influenced policy, altered legislation and challenged established assumptions and the governmentality of the Russian state concerning parenthood, the “good” father and how to deal with the ongoing demographic crisis.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: ISTR Conference Working Paper Series. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

School of Social Sciences

Political Science


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: On conference website. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Adrienne Sörbom

Jan Jämte


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Sociology


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: . : .

Individual political orientation can be conceptualized on two dimensions: acceptance vs. rejection of social change and acceptance vs. rejection of inequality. We propose a theoretical model where the orthogonal primary axes represent acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, and tough mindedness vs. empathy, respectively. The former axis corresponds to the conservation-openness to change dimension in the Schwartz's (1992) value model; the latter axis corresponds to the self-enhancement vs. self-transcendence dimension. Two secondary axes represent the possible combinations of the variables defining the primary axes. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty avoidance result in high system justification, whereas empathy in combination with uncertainty acceptance represents low system justification. This axis corresponds to the growth vs. self-protection dimension of the refined Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty acceptance results in preference for self-reliance, whereas the opposite combination represents preference for dependence on others. This axis corresponds to the social vs. personal focus of the Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Participants (N = 287) completed measures of SDO, RWA, system justification, NFC, moral motives, values, dependence, and a number of political attitude measures. Multidimensional scaling supported the proposed model. The results show that the social and economic aspects of political orientation are both theoretically and empirically separable, and can be at least partially explained with the importance of basic values. The model allows a deeper analysis of individual political orientation beyond a simple liberal-conservative division.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Girts Dimdins

Henry Montgomery

Maria Sandgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Psychology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

Individual political orientation is primarily comprised of two dimensions: acceptance vs. rejection of social change and acceptance vs. rejection of inequality. We propose a theoretical model where the orthogonal primary axes represent both dimensions (corresponding to acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, and tough mindedness vs. empathy, respectively). Two secondary axes represent the possible combinations of these psychological variables. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty avoidance result in pronounced system justification tendencies, whereas empathy in combination with uncertainty acceptance represent low system justification. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty acceptance results in preference for self-reliance, whereas the opposite combination represents preference for dependence on others. Participants (N = 287) completed measures of SDO, RWA, system justification, NFC, moral motives, values, dependence, and a number of political attitude measures. Multidimensional scaling supported the proposed model. The model allows a deeper analysis of individual political orientation beyond a simple liberal-conservative division.To explain individual political orientation, we propose and successfully test a theoretical model where two primary dimensions of acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, and tough mindedness vs. empathy are combined resulting in the secondary dimensions of high vs. low system justification, and high vs. low dependence on others.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Girts Dimdins

Henry Montgomery

Maria Sandgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Psychology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: ISJR Conference Program. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Girts Dimdins

Henry Montgomery

Maria Sandgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Psychology


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: On conference website. : .

Although often measured on a single right-left (or conservative-liberal) continuum, individual political orientation can be conceptualized as consisting of at least two orthogonal dimensions. The first is acceptance vs. rejection of social change, and the second is acceptance vs. rejection of inequality. We propose a theoretical model where the former dimension is represented as acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, and the latter dimension is represented as tough mindedness vs. empathy. The former axis corresponds to the conservation vs. openness to change dimension in the Schwartz's (1992) value model; the latter axis corresponds to the self-enhancement vs. self-transcendence dimension. Two secondary axes represent the possible combinations of the variables defining the primary axes. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty avoidance result in high system justification, whereas empathy in combination with uncertainty acceptance represents low system justification. This axis corresponds to the self-protection vs. growth dimension of the refined Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty acceptance results in preference for self-reliance, whereas the opposite combination represents preference for dependence on others. This axis corresponds to the personal vs. social focus of the Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Participants (N = 287) completed both one-dimensional and two-dimensional measures of political orientation, measures of social dominance orientation, right wing authoritarianism, system justification, need for cognitive closure, moral motives, values, dependence on others, and a number of political attitude measures. Multidimensional scaling supported the proposed model. The results show that the network of political beliefs and attitudes that represents individual political orientation can be largely reduced to the basic psychological variables of uncertainty avoidance and tough-mindedness, and that both dimensions of political orientation are separable not only theoretically, but also empirically. Our findings call for using two-dimensional measures of political orientation instead of one-dimensional measures (even in cultural contexts where both dimensions are highly correlated), because each dimension can be used to predict its own set of political beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Girts Dimdins

Henry Montgomery

Maria Sandgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences

Psychology


Research area for doctoral studies

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In: . : .

This study tests a theoretical model where the social dimension of political orientation (acceptance vs. rejection of social change) is represented as acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, and the economic dimension (acceptance vs. rejection of inequality) is represented as tough mindedness vs. empathy. The former axis corresponds to the conservation-openness to change dimension in the Schwartz's (1992) value model; the latter axis corresponds to the self-enhancement vs. self-transcendence dimension. {Schwartz, 1992 #322}Two secondary axes represent the possible combinations of the variables defining the primary axes. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty avoidance result in high system justification, whereas empathy in combination with uncertainty acceptance represents low system justification. This axis corresponds to the growth vs. self-protection dimension of the refined Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Tough mindedness in combination with uncertainty acceptance results in preference for self-reliance, whereas the opposite combination represents preference for dependence on others. This axis corresponds to the social vs. personal focus of the Schwartz et al. (2011) value model. Participants (N = 287) completed measures of SDO, RWA, system justification, NFC, moral motives, values, dependence, and a number of political attitude measures. Multidimensional scaling supported the proposed model. The results show that the network of political beliefs and attitudes that represents individual political orientation can be largely reduced to the basic psychological variables of uncertainty avoidance and tough-mindedness, and that both dimensions of political orientation are separable, both theoretically and empirically. The model allows a deeper analysis of individual political orientation beyond a simple liberal-conservative division.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Girts Dimdins

Henry Montgomery