About us / Centres

CBEES

Graphic element for CBEES - the Centre for Baltic and East European StudiesThe Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES) is tasked with stimulating, coordinating and developing Södertörn University’s research and doctoral education. It has a particular focus on studies of the Baltic Sea region and Eastern Europe and conducts its own research.

Since it was founded in 2005, CBEES has become a strong and thriving multidisciplinary research environment. The centre is a hub for cooperation throughout the Baltic Sea region and Eastern Europe, organising international conferences, seminars and workshops. The researchers’ expertise is in demand both within academia and in public debate. Research in the area is reflected in the international Baltic Worlds journal.

Many international visiting researchers have passed through the centre of the years, and more than 70 doctoral students have studied at BEEGS, the Baltic and East European Graduate School.

Publications

Publications from the DiVA publications database are listed here on an ongoing basis.

The publications listed below are linked to the profile Baltic Sea region and Eastern Europe at Södertörn University. For more details see the web page "Research in the Baltic Sea region and Eastern Europe".

CBEES' publications include an academic series called Baltic and East European Studies and doctoral theses from  BEEGS (the Baltic and East European Graduate School), as well as Baltic Worlds, a quarterly scholarly journal and news magazine that is published by CBEES. More information is available via the menu on the right.

Publications

In: The Baltic Sea Region: A Comprehensive Guide. Berlin : Berliner Wissenschafts-Verlag GmbH, 2017. 115-168.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Joakim Ekman

Mai-Brith Schartau


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Over the past few decades there have emerged greater possibilities for users and consumers of media to create or engage in the creation of digital media technologies. This PhD dissertation explores the ways in which the broadening of possibilities for making technologies, specifically software, has been taken advantage of by new producers of digital culture – freelancers, aspiring digital media creators and small studios – in the production of digital visual media. It is based on two empirical case studies that concern the making of free software for computer graphics animation production in two contexts: by a loose collective of anime fans in Siberia, Russia, and by a small animation studio in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The case studies are presented and analysed in the scope of four journal articles and one book chapter which form the core of the dissertation.The dissertation draws on a media practice perspective and an understanding of software as an artefact that concentrates and mediates specific infrastructural arrangements that entangle politics of technological production, economic interests and practice-related concerns. The analytical focus of the research problematises in particular practices of software decommodification and its further repair and development by non-programmers; the anchoring of software development and repair in actual production practices of computer graphics animations; and a commitment to sharing software, animations and other artefacts online as commons. The thesis combines several concepts from anthropology and science and technology studies to theorise these practices: – politics and regimes of value (Appadurai, 1986); repair and artful integrations (Jackson, 2014; Suchman, 2000); gifting (Baudrillard, 1981; Mauss, 1925/2002) and autonomy (cf Bourdieu, 1993). Bringing together these concepts, the dissertation regards them as constitutive and indicative of what I refer to as ‘media-related infrastructuring practices’, or practices in which non-programmers generate infrastructures through creating and mediating arrangements around technical artefacts like software.The results of the dissertation indicate how making free software for computer graphics media is entangled in diverse conditions of technological unevenness that may enable, but also limit, the possibilities of aspiring media creators to improve their status or work positions in the broader field of digital media.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Patrik Åker

Julia Velkova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2017, 10 (3): 96-96.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Historisk Tidskrift (S) 2017, 137 (3): 482-483.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nordicom Information 2017, 39 (1): 127-129.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift 2017, 119 (2): 338-341.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Postcolonial Studies 2017, 20 (3): 294-316.

Some states create geographical imaginaries that envision the homeland as coherent and good, and the spaces of Others as disordered, dangerous and therefore legitimate objects of violence. Such ‘violent cartographies’ serve not only to justify policy actions, but constitute bordering practices aiming to provide stability, integrity and continuity to the Self, sometimes referred to as ‘ontological security’. This article examines the role of creativity and artistic imagination in challenging dominant geopolitical narratives. It examines satire on the Russian-language internet, which played upon the Russian state’s geopolitical narrative about the war in Ukraine 2014–15. Three themes within this dominant narrative – (1) the imperialist idea of Russia as a modernising force, (2) the gendering of Ukraine as feminine and Europe as homosexual and (3) the idea that the current war was a re-enactment of Russia’s historical battle against fascism – all became the object of fun-making in satire. I argue that satire, by appropriating, repeating but slightly displacing official rhetoric in ways that make it appear ridiculous, may destabilise dominant narratives of ontological security and challenge their strive towards closure. Satire may expose the silences of dominant narratives and undermine the essentialism and binarism upon which they rely, opening up for estrangement and disidentification.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Emil Edenborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: What is Sustainable Journalism?. New York : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017. 277-295.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Fredrik Stiernstedt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal on Ethnopolitics and Minority Issues in Europe 2017, 16 (2): 41-66.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nina Carlsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Radical left movements in Europe. Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2017. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Grzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2017.

When the Iron Curtain lifted in 1989, it was seen by some as proof of the final demise of the ideas and aspirations of the radical left. Not many years passed, however, before the critique of capitalism and social inequalities were once again the main protest themes of social movements. This book provides an account of radical left movements in today’s Europe and how they are trying to accomplish social and political change.The book’s international group of leading experts provide detailed analysis on social movement organizations, activist groups, and networks that are rooted in the left-wing ideologies of anarchism, Marxism, socialism, and communism in both newly democratized post-communist and longstanding liberal-democratic polities. Through a range of case studies, the authors explore how radical left movements are influenced by their situated political and social contexts, and how contemporary radical left activism differs from both new and old social movements on one hand, and the activities of radical left parliamentary parties on the other. Ultimately, this volume investigates what it means to be ‘radical left’ in current day liberal-democratic and capi- talist societies after the fall of European state socialism.This is valuable reading for students and researchers interested in European politics, contemporary social movements and political sociology.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Christian Fröhlich

Grzegorz PiotrowskiMagnus Wennerhag

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

New Media and Society 2017, : -.

Research on digital activism has gained traction in recent years. At the same time, it remains a diverse and open field that lacks a coherent mode of inquiry. For the better or worse, digital activism remains a fuzzy term. In this introduction to a special issue on digital activism, we review current attempts to periodize and historicize digital activism. Although there is growing body of research on digitial activism, many contributions remain limited through their ahistorical approach and the digital universalism that they imply. Based on the contributions to the special issue, we argue for studying digital activisms in a way that traverses a two-dimensional axis of digital technologies and activist practices, striking the balance between context and media-specificity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Julie Uldam

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

New Media and Society 2017, : -.

The increased influx of refugees in 2015 has led to challenges in transition and destination countries such as Germany, Sweden and Denmark. Volunteer-led initiatives providing urgent relief played a crucial role in meeting the needs of arriving refugees. The work of the volunteers in central stations and transition shelters was mainly organised with the help of Facebook, both in terms of inward and outward communication. This article examines the role of social media for civic participation drawing on Swedish volunteer initiatives that emerged in the context of the migration crisis in 2015 as a case study. Theoretically the article provides an analytical framework including power relations, technological affordances, practices, and discourses that helps to shed light on the interrelation between social media and civic participation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Julie Uldam

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The aim of this thesis is to explore the relation between literary expression and experience in Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy. The principal focus is Merleau-Ponty’s investigations into literature, in two of his first courses at Collège de France, 1953- 1954: Sur le problème de la parole (On the Problem of Speech) and Recherches sur l’usage littéraire du langage (Research on the Literary Use of Language). While the former remains unpublished, the latter was finally published in 2013. At the time of his premature death, Merleau-Ponty left thousands of pages of working notes. They were supposed to contribute to a major philosophical work, the planned title of which was Être et monde (Being and world). Merleau-Ponty had planned to undertake an extensive examination of language in the last part of the work. However, in the absence of this text, the courses on literary language afford us the possibility of sketching the direction that this research might have taken.The examination of literary language use is, for Merleau-Ponty, made possible by an understanding of language found in Ferdinand de Saussure’s linguistics. Merleau-Ponty’s interpretation of Saussurean linguistics anticipates the structuralist reading that was later to dominate the intellectual scene. Instead of reading the linguistics of Saussure in opposition to phenomenology, he finds in the former an ally that allows him to think Husserlian phenomenology further.In the course notes, Merleau-Ponty explores the relation between sensible experience and linguistic expressions through close readings of Proust, Valéry and Stendhal. In the writing of Marcel Proust, he finds a writer that perpetually examines his experience, searching for expressions that are capable of bringing it forth. In Stendhal’s writing, Merleau-Ponty finds a literary method that makes the world appear through the “small true facts” that describe it. Finally, in Paul Valéry’s poetic writing he finds a writer superimposing words over other words, in order to create new significations. In their literary writing he finds a capacity to seize the world anew, beyond our habitual preconceptions of it, thus bringing us closer to the experience we already perceive.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sharon Rider

Lovisa Andén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

This thesis focuses on issues around reflexivity and highly skilled migration. Reflexivity has been an underused concept in migration studies and incurporating it has been long overdue. By reflexivity this thesis understands the capacity of an actor to evaluate his or her position in relation to social structures, to take action in managing those structures and, finally, to critically revise both the position and action taken.There are multiple reasons as to why incorporating reflexivity is a useful endeavor to migration studies. On one hand, using reflexive types in order to understand different migration motivations offers an alternative to otherwise mainly class based explanations behind migration objectives. Migration research has long relied on the idea that migration motivations can be coupled with societal and class background. Similarly, return migration has been described almost unanimously as a result of a homing desire. Both positions, as claimed in this thesis, are oversimplifications. On the other hand, I argue that, reflexivity helps to analyze the importance of class or even society on migration in 21th century. This is why I suggest to analyze all three in concurrence – migration, reflexivity and class.In the following pages I analyze how reflexivity can be operationalized for studying migration. So far, reflexivity has been either used as background concept – mobility studies or for explaining particular kind of migration – lifestyle migration. I argue, that with careful operationalization reflexivity could be useful tool for explaining wide-variety of migrations – family, labour, lifestyle etc. Three articles in this thesis focus on providing such operationalizations, analyzing the relationship between migration motivations and reflexivity. Finally, the first article in this thesis analyzes the background of my particular group of migrants – Estonian highly skilled migrants and positions them in relation to other groups in Estonian society. Moreover, the article also underlines that self-development and lifestyle, if you will, is an important motivation for Eastern European migrants as well.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Adrienne Sörbom

Maarja Saar

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Let them not return. New York & Oxford : Berghahn Books, 2017. 54-69.

This article applies the concept of "cultures of violence" to the long-term violence directed against Christian minorities in the Middle East. It has a lon time perspective going back to the 1840s and the invasions of the Kurdish Leader Badr Khan up until the First World WAr.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Let them not return. New York & Oxford : Berghahn Books, 2017. 1-32.

Bakground to violence targetting various Christian groups in Eastern Anatolia during World War I. Gives an overview of research and known facts about the political, social and economic factors behind genocide.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Naures Atto

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

New York & Oxford : Berghahn Books, 2017.

Edited book with 12 chapters plus introduction. Interdisciplinary with articles by historians, linguists, psychologists, religious scholars and political scientists. Articles deal with the genocide of various small Christian groups living in the Middle East during the First World War and the consequences for the survivors.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Naures Atto

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Journal of social history 2017, : online-.

Book review of a book on the Assyrian Genocide 1915

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Contemporary Approaches to Ethnographic Research. : Sage Publications, 2017. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Interface: a journal for and about social movements 2017, 9 (1): 359-367.

During the last three decades processes of urban development have spread speedily across the globe, transforming hundreds of cities into primary sites for the implementation of a neoliberal agenda. As expected, this global phenomenon brings with it a number of negative consequences for the lives of disadvantaged urban residents. Privatization and commercialization of public space and housing stocks, increasing gentrification of neighbourhoods and deregulation of the housing sector are only a few examples of the adverse scenario that people from less well-off backgrounds have to face. These processes constitute capital-driven strategies that have been enforced by displacing, evicting, marginalizing and criminalizing communities who are, at the same time excluded from any participation in the decision-making process of the urban restructuring. These actions, carried out by corporations, investors and developers and closely backed up by entrepreneurial governments (Mayer, 2009) or “centaur-states” (Wacquant, 2012) are embedded in an accelerated process of accumulation by dispossession (Harvey, 2008) that has exacerbated inequality and widened the gap between the rich and the poor. The effects of this growing polarization in the distribution of power and wealth can be easilyobserved in the spatial forms of the cities, in which gated communities, glittering city centre developments and privatized areas under non-stop surveillance coexist in sharp separation with favelas, precarious and informal settlements and impoverished working class neighbourhoods (Harvey, 2012; Lipman, 2011).

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katia Valenzuela - Fuentes

Anne KaunDominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Revolution och existens. Stockholm : Ersatz, 2017. 133-156.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Transnational Ukraine?. : Ibidem-Verlag, 2017. 89-114.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2017, X (1-2): 100-110.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Political Science Review 2017, : -.

Based on data from a survey conducted in Saint Petersburg in 2013, this article sheds new light on attitudes towards fatherhood in contemporary Russia. We explore what norms are held concerning fatherhood, how these attitudes are related to age, sex, education and income as well as to ideal?typical models established in previous research on fatherhood from Western Europe and the US. Thus, the article also discusses what explanatory value established theoretical models have for the Russian context. Norms of the role of the father in the family are related to general norms of masculinity and, hence, are an important part of the study of politics and the political climate in a society. The results show that there are several fatherhood ideals present in contemporary Northwestern Russia: a traditional breadwinner model, an active fatherhood model as well as what we refer to as a marginalized fatherhood model. The latter has not been substantially identified in previous research, and may tentatively be identified as a legacy of the Soviet era.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johnny Rodin

Joakim Ekman

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geopolitics 2017, 2 (3): 665-692.

The essays collected in this forum discuss the geopolitical legacy of the Russian Revolution of 1917, one of the most momentous political events of the twentieth century. From a range of different academic disciplines and perspectives, the authors consider how the profound transformations in society and politics were refracted through space and geography, and how enduring these refractions proved to be. The authors focus on three themes that have been dominant in Russian affairs over the past century: 1)the problem of center-periphery relations, 2)the civilizational dynamics of Russia’s self-identification in relation to Europe and to Asia, and 3)the geopolitics of national identity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

P. Richardson

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Dagens Nyheter 2017, 22 februari : 6-7.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

After falling under the power of the Russian Crown, the Northern Black Sea steppe from the end of eighteenth century crystallized as the Russian government’s prime venue for socioeconomic and sociocultural reinvention and colonization. Vast ethnic, sociocultural and even ecological changes followed.  Present study is preoccupied with the marriage of the immigrant population from the German lands who came to the region in the course of its state orchestrated colonization, and was officially categorized as “German colonists.” The book illuminates the multiple ways in which marriage and household formation among the colonists was instrumentalized by the imperial politics in the Northern Black Sea steppe, and conditioned by socioeconomic rationality of its colonization. Marriage formation and dissolution among the colonists were gradually absorbed into the competencies of the colonial vertical power. Intending to control colonist marriage and household formation through the introduced marriage regime, the Russian government and its regional representatives lacked the actual means to exert this control at the local level. On the ground, however, imperial politics was mediated by the people it targeted, and by the functionaries tasked with its implementation. As the study reveals, the paramount importance was given to functional households and sustainable farms based on non-conflictual relations between parties. Situated on the crossroads of state, church, community, and personal interests, colonist marriage engendered clashes between secular and ecclesiastical bodies over the supremacy over it. The interplay of colonization as politics, and colonization as an imperial situation with respect to the marriage of the German colonists is explored in this book by concentrating on both norms and practices. Another important consideration is the ways gender and colonization constructed and determined one another reciprocally, both in legal norms and in actual practices. Secret divorces and unauthorized marriages, open and hidden defiance, imitations and unruliness, refashioning of rituals and discourses, and desertions – a number of strategies and performances which challenged and negotiated the marriage regime in the region, were scholarly examined for the first time in this book. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Per Bolin

Julia Malitska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are a class of anxiolytic and anti-depressant drugs. SSRIs act on the evolutionarily ancient serotonergic system which is virtually identical throughout the vertebrate phylum. Serotonin is involved in a wide range of processes ranging from neuronal and craniofacial embryonic development to regulation of behaviour. However, SSRIs are also emerging pollutants, mainly entering the environment via sewage treatment plants. Since the serotonergic system is virtually identical in humans and other animals, exposed animals will be affected in similar ways as humans and suspicions are rising that ecologically important behaviours may be affected in subtle ways. Using the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) as model organisms, this thesis focuses on the behavioural effects of SSRIs in fish. The SSRI used throughout this thesis is citalopram, which has been found in fish in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea and other parts of the world.Effects on behaviour were investigated using several different tests measuring stress response, feeding behaviour, aggression and locomotor activity. Anxiolytic effects of 0.1 μg/l, 1.5 μg/l 15 μg/l were investigated as well as effects of 0.15 μg/l and 1.5 μg/l on feeding behaviour. Because serotonin is involved in the development of the nervous system, the effects of developmental exposure to 1.5 μg/l was studied after 100 days of remediation. Finally, because SSRIs rarely occur alone in natural waters, the effects on zebrafish of citalopram in a cocktail scenario, with the anxiogenic compound 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2 ) was also investigated. Citalopram was found to have anxiolytic effects on the three-spined stickleback at 0.1 μg/l, 1.5 μg/l and 15 μg/l.Citalopram also suppressed feeding behaviour within a week of exposure and at concentrations as low as 0.15 μg/l. Developmental exposure to 1.5 μg/l for 30 days was found to increase aggression and feeding behaviour and to reduce locomotor activity. The changes were persistent and remained in adult fish. In the cocktail scenario, citalopram in single-substance exposure had anxiolytic effects on one parameter in the novel tank test at 0.1 μg/l. Citalopram enhanced the anxiogenic effects of EE2 in the novel tank test, but in the scototaxis test citalopram appeared to counteract the effects of EE2. It is concluded that citalopram has the potential to affect behaviour in fish at concentrations that have been found in close proximity of sewage treatment plants.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Håkan Olsén

Martin Kellner

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

The present investigation discusses the phenomenological concept of the phenomenon through an interpretation of the meaning of the negativity of the phenomenon in the philosophical works of Martin Heidegger, Jan Patočka and Eugen Fink. This negativity is thematised in terms of a loss and a privation that leads to a description of the appearing of the phenomenon as a sublime event, which exposes existence to an absence of meaning. A formulation of the absence in question as a dynamic movement of existence opens a new perspective on what it means to do phenomenology: phenomenological thinking does not begin with the immediate givenness of appearance, but through the trembling of meaning in the experience of a loss of the phenomenon.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback

Krystof Kasprzak

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

The national parks in the Carpathian Mountains along the Polish and Slovak border represent encompassing policy agendas that strive to balance biodiversity conservation and social welfare tasks. These countries have, during the last 25 years, undergone rapid transformation from socialist regimes to liberal democracies, and this transformation has affected the political, social and economic spheres. The accession to the European Union (EU) introduced demands for further changes, such as closer integration of conservation and socioeconomic development and inclusive, transparent and accountable decision-making that are based on participatory mechanisms.This thesis explores key challenges and opportunities for nature conservation policy and practice at the local level in a context of post-socialist legacies and Europeanization. Multi-level governance, Europeanization, and post-socialist studies are used as theoretical vehicles for the analysis of four transboundary national parks: Pieninsky national parks (NP) in both Poland and Slovakia and Bieszczady NP [Poland] and Poloniny NP [Slovakia].The results of this study show that the early designation of the studied parks as protected areas prevented their exploitation and enabled preservation of important landscapes, which currently are highly valued at the European level. These nature conservation regimes have created tangible restrictions on the possible economic uses of these areas. However, rural development alternatives depend on a broader set of local, national and global factors such as the structure of the local economy and employment, the prioritization of nature conservation in national policies, investors’ interest, and increasing urbanization. Europeanization provided opportunities for local actors to benefit from additional funding made available for nature conservation and rural development. At the same time, demands for participatory decision-making posed significant procedural and conceptual challenges to achieving transparent, inclusive and accountable governance. The prevalence of informal practices in local policy-making and the lack of trust in state authorities pose further challenges to formal participatory processes. The opportunities of local actors to reach out across levels to express their interests remain scarce and are not institutionalized, whereas the multi-level characteristics of modern governance indirectly shape local processes by defining common legal and policy frameworks. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Björn Hassler

Natalya Yakusheva

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: The Barents and the Baltic Sea region. Rovaniemi : Historical Association of Northern Finland, 2017. 143-168.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Unasylva 2017, 68 (249): 45-52.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Natalya Yakusheva

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

This thesis investigates the narrated experiences of a number of individuals that migrated to Argentina from Russia and Ukraine in the wake of the fall of the Soviet Union. The over-arching aim of this thesis is to study the ways in which these migrants navigated the social reality in Argentina, with regards to available physical, material, and socioeconomic positions as well as with regards to their narrated self-understandings and identifications. The empirical data consists of ethnographic in-depth interviews and participatory observation from Buenos Aires between the years 2011 and 2014. Through the theoretical frameworks of political discourse theory, critical race studies, auto-ethnography, and theories on coloniality, the author examines questions of migration, mobility, race, class, and gender in the processes of re-establishing a life in a new context. The interviewees were not only directly affected by the collapse of the USSR in the sense that it drastically changed their terrain of possible futures as well as retroactive understandings of their pasts, but they also began their lives in Argentina during the turmoil of the economic crisis that culminated in 2001. Central to this thesis is how these dislocatory events impacted the interviewees’ possibilities and limitations for living the life they had expected, and thus how discursive structures affect subject positions and identifications, and thereby create specific conditions for different relocatory trajectories. By focusing on how these individuals narrate their reasons for migration and their integration into Argentine labor and housing markets, the author demonstrates the role Argentine and East European history, as well as the neoliberal restructuring of the postsocialist region and Argentina in the 1990’s, had for self-understandings, subject positions, identities, and mobility. Various intersections of power, and particularly the making of race and whiteness, are important for the way that the interviewees negotiated subject positions and identifications. The author addresses how affect and hope played a part in these processes and how downward mobility was articulated and made meaningful. She also examines how participants’ ideas about a “good life” were related to understandings of the past, questions of race, social inequality, and a logic of coloniality.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mats Lindqvist

Jenny Ingridsdotter

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: The politics of Eurasianism. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2017. 39-58.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The politics of Eurasianism. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2017. 1-16.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gonzaldo Pozo

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2017.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gonzalo Pozo

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Focusing on the memories of Estonian refugees moving to Sweden in the wake of World War II, I analyze the concepts of “memory space” and history within the framework of the Escape as a master narrative. Following the research participants to the sites of their memories in Estonia and Sweden today, raised the questions what constitutes a lived memory space, and how is history defined within it?Through a combination of a phenomenological analysis of memory’s lived ex­perience, using Walter Benjamin’s concept of montage as radical remembering and its dialectical relation to history, I show how embodied memories shape their own space, a space not always framed by historical master narratives and identity posi­tions, but rather a searching space that is always changing. Dealing with the politics of place and representations, these memories are constantly loaded and unloaded with meaning. Yet the space of lived memory is not always a creation of meaning. Walking around, searching for traces, a memory space confronts the place and maps its own geography. It turns to a spatial and temporal flow, which intertwines place and experience, and erases the past and future as homogeneous categories. It is a living space of memory, rather than a memorial space of representations.The analysis focuses further on the tensions between remembering as a dialogue with history and memory’s ongoing acts of embodied experience. The position of in-betweenness appears in these stories of escape, not as a state of in-between home and away, past and present, but rather as an ongoing space-making process be­tween different modes and layers of memory. This is a process aware of the constant changes in the understandings of both history and personal experiences, intertwin­ing these new interpretations with embodied memory and thereby constantly add­ing new layers of experience to it. Memory’s tracing illuminates a memory poetics of the meanwhile and the in-between, which refuses historical closure.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kyrre Kverndokk

Irina SandomirskajaMaryam Adjam

Magnus Öhlander


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

This study is about seven women’s organizations in Belgrade, Serbia and their relations to domestic and international donors during the period 2003-2006. My main research questions focus on their choices of either domestic or international cooperation partners. How and why did the women organize themselves? What factors were essential when selecting donors? In what ways were the organizations influenced by donors?Through interviews, with organization representatives’ concepts such as gift and reciprocity, power and dependency, trust and mistrust and collective identity emerged.  These concepts were used as points of departure for developing deeper understanding of women organizations’ choice of cooperation partners.The women organizations’ basically had two alternatives for cooperation: cooperation with foreign donors which offered funds, organizational development and social networks. Alternately, cooperation with local donors, which offered the equivalent except for the organizational development. Cooperation with the foreign donor has resulted in more professional attitudes to the work that have been desired by other international donors. A result is that they can compete with other women’s organizations’ for international funding. Cooperation with local donors has led to fewer resources but more independent working practices. For these women organizations’ independence was important so they choose partners who, they felt more respected this allowing them to write articles or discuss gender in the media with little external influence. Regardless of the chosen donor the reciprocity is embedded in the relation between the donor and the receiver of aid, which in various ways is beneficial for both parties. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ali Hajighasemi

Sanja Obrenovic

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Ad Marciam. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2017. 175-183.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Tora Lane

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Energy policies which maintain and extend nuclear energy are often opposed by anti-nuclear movements. Ambitious plans for developing nuclear energy in Russia, constructing a first nuclear plant in Poland, and lifting the ban on nuclear energy while allowing the replacement of old reactors in Sweden are examples of such energy policies. In contrast to the massive anti-nuclear movements of 1970-1990s, recent anti-nuclear movements are not organized as national protest campaigns. This thesis examines repertoires of anti-nuclear movements in the alleged “Nuclear Renaissance” period.  Repertoires of anti-nuclear actions are analyzed from the perspective of discursive and political opportunities of anti-nuclear movements. Discursive opportunities are enabled or hindered in the ordering of nuclear energy discourses, making messages and actions of social movements legitimate or illegitimate. While discourses of anti-nuclear movements are complex, official discourses of nuclear energy featuring arguments about profitability, energy security and environmental security in connection to nuclear energy development, resonate more with broader socio-political developments. Ordering of discourses is established in such a way that expert rhetoric becomes a standard approach for discussing nuclear energy, while references to emotions and subjective matters are unacceptable.Political contexts of anti-nuclear movements provide opportunities for environmental NGOs, one kind of actor in anti-nuclear movements, to pursue nonconfrontational strategies and engage in institutional channels, where they can contribute their expert knowledge. Concurrently, another actor in anti-nuclear movements, local anti-nuclear groups, on the one hand, share argumentative structures with environmental NGOs, and, on the other hand, attempt to mobilize local population and organize local protests. Due to limited opportunities for attention from the national media and focus on local issues, local protests are not featured in the national media, which is crucial for national protest actions.The differences in repertoires between these two kinds of actors and absence of actors opting for mass engagement provide insight into repertoires of anti-nuclear movements as a whole. This thesis demonstrates how discursive opportunities of social movements, which result from competing discourses of movements and their counter-agents, and political opportunities structure repertoires of actions of these movements.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mai-Brith Schartau

Ekaterina Tarasova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Geografiska Notiser 2017, LXXV (1): 51-52.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Stuttgart : Ibidem-Verlag, 2017.

This book analyzes the representation of the socialist past in the national history museums of the former Yugoslavia. Through travels to Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Kosovo, and Macedonia, the study elucidates the process of constructing the national narratives that maintain and legitimize a particular vision of the common past. Cross-national comparison allows for analysis of the democratic development of each state in relation to the politics of memory in the region and the role of political actors in its construction.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Alina Zubkovych

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

This PhD thesis in environmental science aims to contribute to the theoretical and empirical understanding of the relation between participation and legitimacy in multi-level environmental governance.It is widely assumed that actor involvement has great potential to improve the legitimacy of nature conservation through long-term acceptance and target achievement. However, local resource conflicts problematize the way a relation between participation and legitimacy is depicted on other administrative levels. Studies exploring the effect that participation has on legitimacy are relatively rare, especially in multi-level arrangements of coastal conservation.In this thesis the relation between participation and legitimacy on the local level is examined, as well as how this relation is conditioned by multi-level governance and power. The relation is empirical studied with two local implementation processes of the Helsinki Convention’s network of marine protected areas (HELCOM MPAs). The cases are located in Sweden.Sweden and the Baltic Sea region are in the forefront of participation in nature conservation, and therefore act as a strong case for the exploration of institutional participation. However, despite apparent political will and international support, the efficiency of actor involvement for nature conservation has been questioned, also for the HELCOM MPA and especially on the local level.Based on the results of this study, I question the assumption that weak legitimacy predominantly is an issue of insufficient information sharing. The findings show that involving actors to legitimize the adoption of strict adherence to a pre-established model of conservation likely fails to create long term support for conservation. Instead, relocation of power to the affected actors seems essential in order to make participation establish legitimacy. It appears important to create room for local influence in the design, management and implementation of a particular conservation area in the particular place/context. In both examined cases, there are elements of participation that support legitimacy, for example the development of a shared vision. There are also elements that hamper legitimacy, such as, for example, the high expectations different actors have on participation to reach consensus on protective values. These unmet expectations seem to fuel conflicts of interests among actors on different levels.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Magnus Boström

Linn Rabe


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Art in Transfer in the Era of Pop. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2017. 215-237.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Oscar Svanelid

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Walls between Conflict and Peace. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2017. 263-293.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (4): 83-87.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Imprópia 2016, 5 : 15-23.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Psicologia 2016, 32 : -10.

This study assessed the influence of Stereotypes about Parliamentarians and Behavioral Contagion on Political Participation, comparing two countries: Brazil and Sweden. Stereotypes were admitted to be useful to tell parliamentarians' groups apart and predict their behavior. Behavioral Contagion was investigated as a possible catalyst of political action. Online questionnaires were administered to 984 Brazilians (37.4% women) and 879 Swedes (46.5% women). Structural Equation Modeling assessed relationships among variables. Behavioral Contagion played a pivotal role on predicting political engagement. Stereotypes predicted participation where they challenged commonsense: Brazilians usually cannot tell the difference among politicians, then those Brazilians who could were more politically engaged; in Sweden, the factor "corruption" predicts non-institutional types of Participation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Thiago Lopes Carneiro

Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Rhetorica Scandinavica 2016, 74 : 55-71.

This text aims at investigating the possible effects that Cassin’s rereading of the battle between the philosophers and the sophist might have on the contemporary understanding of the connection between rhetoric and the political. Through her critique of Plato and Aristotle the conflict between Philosophy and Sophistics is perceived as one regarding being (ontology/logology) rather than, as traditionally, one of knowledge (epistemology/doxology). Finally, a possible foundation for a logological understanding of the political is sketched with the help of concepts from Lacanian psychoanalysis.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Alexander Stagnell

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Rhetoric

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Форум новейшей восточноевропейской истории и культуры 2016, 14 (2): 87-101.

В этой статье я подхожу к вопросу памяти об Организации Украинских Нацио- налистов и Украинской Повстанческой Армии (ОУН и УПА соответственно) в региональной перспективе. На примере одного конкретного случая построения памятника одному из командиров УПА – Климу Савуру – прослеживается, как героическая память об ОУН и УПА устанавливалась в Ровенской области. Эта область входит в один исторический регион – Волынь. Именно здесь сформиро- вались первые группы УПА в 1942 году, а также именно на Волыни произошли самые трагические события в истории УПА – убийства польского населения в 1943 году, которые потом перенеслись на Галичину. Я не рассматриваю историю самого украинско-польского конфликта (заинтересованный читатель может обра- титься к цитированной ниже литературе), а то, как история ОУН и УПА входила в культуру памяти региона, начиная с 1991 года. Памятник Климу Савуру – пример того, как место и форма памяти могут быть основаны больше на амнезии, чем на воспоминании. Как мы увидим, через про- цесс мифологизации его биографии почти все исторические факты о личности командира УПА исчезли. Единственная характеристика, на которой основывает- ся коммеморация – это архетип, который выражает ценности и интересы деяте- лей, которые занимались строительством памятника и продвижением героиче- ской формы памяти об ОУН и УПА. Такая мифологизация позволила проводить политику памяти через призывы к исторической справедливости, забывая при этом о тех несправедливостях, которые произошли под командованием этой исторической личности.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Swedish Cinema and the Sexual Revolution. Jefferson : McFarland, 2016. 185-200.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Klara Arnberg

Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal of Transnational American Studies 2016, 7 (1): 1-18.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical Studies

In: Historiens hemvist II. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 249-270.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (4): 95-96.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mats Rosengren

Alexander Stagnell

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Rhetoric

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Geografiska Notiser 2016, LXXIV (4): 194-196.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds In-house edition 2016, : 45-46.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Rim Economies 2016, 4 : 49-49.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Lanham : Lexington Books, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mikhail Suslov

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Apparatus 2016, 2-3 : -.

In his Theresienstadt 1941/1945, Hans Günther Adler describes episodes of film making in Theresienstadt giving most attention to the history of the production of the 1944 film. He sums up the episode calling its purpose and organisation by the SS "the gruesome carnival". Interesting enough, while giving a whole chapter in the book to a description of Theresienstadt's cultural life, Adler never mentions the film among other examples of cultural expression but inserts its description into Theresienstadt's administrative chronicle. The film receives a place for itself within the context of the bureaucratic transformations of Theresienstadt from a closed camp into a "ghetto" and finally into a purely decorative "Jewish settlement". This latter transformation Adler describes as part of the cynical campaign of "Verschönerung" of Theresienstadt, an attempt of the SS and the administration to make it presentable to international observers. Adler describes the cruel film carneval as the campaign's piece de resistance and thus resolutely excludes the film from the domain of cultural phenomena as if rejecting any possibility for its redemption. Instead, he inscribes the project into the administrative logic of extermination, filmmaking becoming an additional – inventive in its cruelty and effective – technique of moral extermination in the world of "der verwaltete Mensch". In this article, I emphasize Adler's view of the moving image as a predominantly administrative means, and not a medium of cultural expression. This view becomes quite challenging and complex if Adler's witness account of the film project in Theresienstadt is read together with his reflection on mechanically reproducible, and especially moving, images in Adler's fiction. I will focus on Adler's treatment of the image and image technology in his novels Panorama and Eine Reise / The Journey, with a special attention to the way he considers the relation between the apparatus, memory, and witnessing.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Slavic Review 2016, 75 (3): 787-788.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Waffen-SS. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2016. -.

Book abstract: This is the first systematic pan-European study of the hundreds of thousands of non-Germans who fought ― either voluntarily or under different kinds of pressures ― for the Waffen-SS (or auxiliary police formations operating in the occupied East). Building on the findings of regional studies by other scholars ― many of them included in this volume ― The Waffen-SS aims to arrive at a fuller picture of those non-German citizens (from Eastern as well as Western Europe) who served under the SS flag. Where did the non-Germans in the SS come from (socially, geographically, and culturally)? What motivated them? What do we know about the practicalities of international collaboration in war and genocide, in terms of everyday life, language, and ideological training? Did a common transnational identity emerge as a result of shared ideological convictions or experiences of extreme violence? In order to address these questions (and others), The Waffen-SS adopts an approach that does justice to the complexity of the subject, adding a more nuanced, empirically sound understanding of collaboration in Europe during World War II, while also seeking to push the methodological boundaries of the historiographical genre of perpetrator studies by adopting a transnational approach.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Madeleine HurdSteffen Werther

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Geopolitics 2016, 2 (3): 623-639.

This paper analyses the contemporary deployment of the Nordic welfare state model as a centrepiece of Nordic competitive identity and strategic communication on the global market of ideas. First, it looks at the interrelated phenomena of global competition, competitive identity and region branding. Second, it studies the interplay between Nordic transnational public diplomacy and national public diplomacy of individual Nordic countries, in particular Sweden, on the one hand and international media outlets’ reporting on the Nordic countries on the other. In analysing this cross-fertilizing genre, the paper identifies how the welfare state is being repackaged for export along with a set of “progressive values” which are coded as specifically “Nordic.” The paper discusses (1) the interaction between outer images and inner visions; (2) the place and significance of the Nordic model, progressive values and the welfare state in today’s Nordic branding; and (3) the possible function of outward competitive identity as a kind of “compensatory imagination” directed inward as well as outward.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds In-house edition 2016, : 49-51.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Storm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Industrisamhällets landskap. : Svenska industriminnesföreningen, 2016. 21-31.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Storm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Urbanismer. Lund : Nordic Academic Press, 2016. 196-213.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Storm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Stockholm : Carlsson Bokförlag, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: De intellektuellas förräderi?. Lund : Arkiv förlag & tidskrift, 2016. 95-120.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Deutschland Archiv (Online) 2016, : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann-Judith Rabenschlag

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Polska jako peryferie. Warsaw : Wydawnictwo Naukowe SCHOLAR, 2016. 254-267.

The chapter analyses changes in the perception of Poland and Poles in the Danish press after 2009. The authors investigate three major discursive fields of narrative framing, such as freedom, progress and modernity and the field of image-building. In the conclusion a question is posed about the sustainability of the observed changes in the perception.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Dominika Bartnik-Swiatek

Kazimierz Musial

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (1-2): 46-56.

Two Polish cities, Warsaw and Poznań, are studied in the article to examine how external structures are handled and used by squatters in these two settings. The aim is to analyze opportunity structures that condition the emergence and development of squatting and how squatters respond to and utilize these opportunities. Our ambition is to understand why squatting has developed differently in the two cities by emphasizing the duration and cohesion of the squatting scene as pivotal for the different trajectories of squatting. It is argued in the article that the durability of the squatting environment abates tendencies to open the squatting scene to external coalitions and establish more institutionalized forms of political struggle.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika PolanskaGrzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (3): 37-48.

This paper deals with the dilemmas scholars can run into when they encounter the conflict between political activists and what can be proven by evidence. The disputewith historians revolves around what the anthropologist Michel-Rolph Trouillot terms “Silencing the past”. This is certainly true in the case of the Roma and genocide.What complicates the case is that a long-standing memory is part of a still ongoing political activist campaign to build a recognized memory for all of Europe’s Roma.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Global Humanities: studies in histories, cultures, and societies 2016, 3 : 103-119.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann-Judith Rabenschlag

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

The present investigation develops the notion of sociality based on Emmanuel Levinas’s thought, and proposes an understanding of sociality that resists becoming a common foundation: an un-common sociality which interrupts the reciprocal shared common, and thereby, paradoxically, makes it possible. By engaging in the larger debate on community, this work gives voice to Levinas on the question of community without a common ground, a topic and a debate where he has previously been underestimated. In this way, the aim is to reveal new directions opened up by Levinas’s philosophy in order to think an un-common sociality.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Fredrika Spindler

Ramona Rat

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Rhetorica Scandinavica 2016, 71/72 : 9-16.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Alexander Stagnell

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Rhetoric

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Lund : Lunds universitet, 2016.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Sociology of Health and Illness 2016, 38 (7): 1074-1091.

This article examines how discourses on assisted reproductive technologies are locally appropriated, translated or contested in the specific cultural and political contexts of Poland and Sweden. The aim is to investigate how two national patients' organisations, namely the Polish association Nasz Bocian and the Swedish organisation Barnlängtan, articulate rights claims in the context of reproductive technologies. To this end, we investigate how these organisations utilise specific context-dependent and affectively laden political vocabularies in order to mobilise politically, and discuss how each of these two groups gives rise to a different set of politicised reproductive identities. In order to trace which political vocabularies the respective organisations utilise to mobilise their respective rights claims, we draw primarily on political discourse theory and concepts of political grammars and empty signifiers. Lastly, we discuss which political reproductive identities emerge as a result of these different versions of political mobilisation around assisted reproductive technologies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Elzbieta KorolczukJenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and EducationSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
EthnologyGender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural TheoryHistorical Studies

This dissertation investigates the way that feminist resistance is expressed in two Swedish and two German so-called New Woman novels from the turn of the twentieth century: Elin Wägner’s Pennskaftet (1910, Penwoman), Gabriele Reuter’s Aus guter Familie (1895, From a Good Family), Hilma Angered-Strandberg’s Lydia Vik (1904), and Grete Meisel-Hess’s Die Intellektuellen (1911).The theoretical apparatus is comprised by the work of Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Jacques Lacan, and Jessica Benjamin. By introducing a psychoanalytic and feminist perspective, this dissertation seeks to develop the possibilities for agency and resistance within the framework of Foucault’s theories. It investigates four textual and contextually grounded strategies of resistance that are prominent in these novels: individuality, openness, desire, and eugenics.This study demonstrates how Gabriele Reuter, Grete Meisel-Hess, and  Hilma Angered-Strandberg, inspired by the ideas of Friedrich Nietzsche and Ellen Key, depict feminine individuality in relation to a scientific and philosophical discourse that specifically denied women individuality. The authors anchor individuality in a corporality that was similarly denied to women by a bourgeois and dogmatic Christian discourse.Openness and wit function as resistance strategies in Elin Wägner’s Pennskaftet. Humorous rejoinders and narrative comments can disarm a conservative. An open attitude towards the emancipation project could also help to resolve the conflicts between different feminist positions and between different women.Desire functions as an important resistance strategy in each of the novels examined. It is variously represented as a vital instinct, a desire for knowledge, and a sexual desire, as in Gabriele Reuter’s Aus guter Familie – or as a desire for suffrage, as in Pennskaftet, or for maternity legislation, as in Grete Meisel-Hess’s Die Intellektuellen. By formulating a notion of feminine desire, turn-of-the-century feminists were able both to seize control of sexuality from the church and to wrest morality from the grasp of the bourgeoisie. These resistance strategies could also have a biopolitical character: in Grete Meisel-Hess’s Die Intellektuellen, woman is placed at the service of humanity on eugenicist grounds, and her good qualities are seen as capable of promoting humanity’s progress.This dissertation shows that in these novels desire at the individual level serves to reinforce feminine subjectivity. Love is seen as associated with an intensified sense of life and as a precondition of creativity. At the social level, desire also functions as the basis for a feeling of solidarity among women that instils in them courage and an urge to persevere in the suffrage struggle, this latter a highly protracted process. In this way desire acquires political potential.A framing chapter on context provides the intellectual and philosophical backgrounds of the various strategies of resistance. It is followed by four analytical chapters, each of which addresses one novel.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Claudia Lindén

Cecilia Annell

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

-

The broad aim of this thesis is twofold: firstly, I contextualise the Maausk movement and its practitioners’ understandings in relation to history and the surrounding society; secondly, I analyse the affective and embodied experiences of being a Maausk practitioner from a phenomenological perspective.The thesis focuses on the formation and practice of Maausk, which is perceived to be deeply tied to the society and history where it exists. Relatedly, this study examines how Maausk identity formation and practices have been influenced by the Soviet legacy, romantic nationalism and Estonia’s current economic and political situation.In order to analyse the Maausk experiences and narratives, this study draws from various phenomenologically oriented theories of affect, embodiment and emotion, as well as cultural theories of place, identity, tradition and authenticity. I have used economic anthropology and globalisation theories as well as historical studies of Estonia’s Soviet past to contextualise the Maausk movement. Further, to place Maausk in the European religious landscape, this study refers to native faith and Neo-pagan studies.Through sensory ethnography, this study draws on the affective and emotional aspects of the research material to analyse how the complexity of emotional experiences of being a Maausk practitioner produces Maausk meanings and values. The study also examines the role and function of the body and emotions during the process of embodying the Maausk practices, both techniques and meanings of the practices.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Maria Zackariasson

Jenni Rinne


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

The decision to institute Area Studies in German universities in 1917, was born out of a perceived need to widen the intellectual horizon of the public and academia alike. At Greifswald University this ambitious reform programme saw the foundation of a Nordic Institute, charged with interdisciplinary studies of contemporary Northern Europe. Its interdisciplinarity and implicit role in public diplomacy made the Nordic Institute, and the institutions that succeeded it, an anomaly within the university, until the institute was fundamentally reformed in the early 1990s. The study explores the institutional development of the institute under five different political regimes – Kaiserreich, Weimar Republic, Third Reich, GDR and FRG. It does so through the lens of scholars as utility-seeking actors, manoeuvring between the confines of an academic environment and the possibilities afforded by the institute’s political task. It becomes apparent that the top-down institution of interdisciplinary scholarship produced a number of conflicts between the disciplinarily organized career path on theone hand, and scholars’ investment in broader regional research on the other. Personal conflicts in a confined and competitive environment, and a persistent shortage of funding provided further incentives for scholars to overcome perceived limitations of the academic sphere by offering their cooperation to the political field. Individual attempts to capitalize on a reciprocal exchange of resources with the political field remained a feature under all political regimes, but the opportunity to do so successfully depended on the receptiveness of the political field. Cooperation, where it was established, also proved to be difficult, with the interests of political and academic actors often diverging, and the political side’s interest becoming dominant. The study examines the underlying motivations of scholars to seek assistance from outside the academic field, but also the problems connected with that approach, and demonstrates the specific problems faced by Area Studies in a German context.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Norbert Götz

Marco Nase

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds In-house edition 2016, March : 12-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (1-2): 107-108.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (1-2): 116-116.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Utopian studies 2016, 27 (1): 53-76.

This essay examines the Etnogenez series of science fiction and fantasy novels. Launched in 2009 by the media producer, "political technologist," and Kremlin insider Konstantin Rykov, Etnogenez has enjoyed truly phenomenal success, developing into one of the most ambitious publishing projects of the post-Soviet period. At present it numbers more than fifty works, which circulate in millions of copies and additionally are broadly disseminated on the Internet and as e-books, audiobooks, and podcasts. There are Etnogenez fan clubs, computer games, and dozens of Internet discussion groups. Although the novels in the series differ widely in their plots and subjects, and are written in a variety of different science fiction genres, all of them are loosely inspired by the work of the historian and geographer Lev Nikolaevich Gumilev, in particular his theories of ethnogenesis (from which the project takes its name), passionarnost', and Eurasianism. The essay explores the powerful resonances between the Etnogenez project, the Gumilevian legacy, and the leading political and social narratives of Putin's Russia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In 1990, the Institute for Historical and Socio-Political Studies of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party was closed, since the Party was dissolved by the Romanian Revolution. Similar institutions had existed in all countries belonging to the Soviet bloc. This Institute was founded in 1951 under the name of the Party History Institute, and modelled on the Marx-Lenin-Engels Institute in Moscow. Since then, it served the Communist Party in producing thousands of books and journals on the history of the Party and of Romania, following Party orders. Previous research has portrayed the Institute as a loyal executioner of the Party’s will, negating the agency of its history-writers in influencing the duties of the Institute. However, the recent opening of the Institute’s archive has shown that a number of internal and previously obscured dynamics impacted on its activities. This book is dedicated to the study of the Party History Institute, of the history-writers employed there, and of the narratives they produced. By studying the history-writers and their host institution, this study re-contextualizes the historiography produced under Communist rule by analysing the actual conditions under which it was written: the interrelation between dynamics of control and the struggle for resources, power and positions play a fundamental role in this history. This is the first scholarly inquiry about a highly controversial institute that struggled in order to follow the constantly shifting Party narrative canon, while competing formaterial resources with rival Party and academic institutions. The main actors in this study are the history-writers: Party veterans, young propagandists and educated historians, in conflicting networks and groups, struggled in order to gain access to the limited resources and positions provided by the Party, and in order to survive the political changes imposed by the leadership. By doing so they succeed, on many occasions, to influence the activities of the Institute.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Per Bolin

Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds In-house edition 2016, : 5-9.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Linn Rabe

Vasileios Petrogiannis

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary StudiesSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geografiska Notiser 2016, LXXIV (1): 55-56.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Energy Research & Social Science 2016, 13 : 170-179.

This article examines how members of the Swedish Parliament framed nuclear energy in the 2010 debate on the future of nuclear power in Sweden in order to understand how politicians construct and contextualize their views on the role of nuclear energy in energy transitions. Our findings suggest that four themes could be identified in the debate and that these were formative for politicians in framing nuclear energy. Even though all political actors anticipate an energy transition towards a more sustainable system, different paths to advancing in this process were brought up in the debate, both with and without prolongation of the nuclear energy program. Our analysis suggests that framings of nuclear energy are closely related to the political ideologies of the parties in the Parliament because the two framings of nuclear energy correspond with the division of the Swedish Parliament into two political blocs. However, views on nuclear energy are not inherent to political ideologies but are constructed. This article thus integrates the politics of nuclear energy within the research on energy transitions.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina TarasovaKarin Edberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political ScienceSociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

London : Overseas Development Institute, 2016. (HPG Working Paper ; January 2016)

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical StudiesPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Critical Kinship Studies. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2016. 33-47.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Journal of Housing and the Built Environment 2016, 31 (1): 171-173.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Interactions 2016, 7 (1): 23-39.

The Occupy movement, which started with a group of activists in New York, soon grew into a global movement with protesters gathering and occupying public spaces worldwide. This article provides a critical discourse analysis and examines the representation of the global as well as local expressions of the Occupy movement in Latvian and Swedish major newspapers. It shifts the lens from the financial centres to the European periphery and asks how the movement is recontextualized in Latvia and Sweden. In the analysis four main discursive strategies are identified and discussed comparatively for the two countries; nomination, predication, perspectivation and mitigation. Although the discursive strategies in both contexts are similar, the recontextualization in Latvia and Sweden reflects the distinct historical and cultural circumstance in which the mediation of the Occupy movement emerged.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and EducationSchool of Social Sciences
Media and Communication StudiesSociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2015, VIII (3-4): 123-124.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ukraina Moderna 2015, 22 : 233-236.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Byggnadskultur 2015, 1 : 50-51.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Storm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Topos (Munchen) 2015, 93 : 32-37.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Storm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Studier i Pædagogisk Filosofi 2015, 4 (2): 81-93.

Cosmopolitanism is a value-loaded concept that seems to become popular in intervals. The latest cosmopolitan period started after the end of the Cold War and the breakdown of the Soviet Union and concentrated mostly on aspects such as “a new world order”, and often with reference to Kant. It might be questioned if the cosmopolitan period still exists. Here it is suggested that a historical understanding of cosmopolitanism together with experience from later social and political experiences might give a new perspective on the difficulties of creating a better world in a Kantian sense, including cosmopolitan education. Considering its history and taking concern of experience Kant’s cosmopolitanism still is relevant, not least in its broader sense.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: "...die letzten Schranken fallen lassen". Köln : Böhlau, 2015. 224-255.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marco Nase

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Diacronie. Studi di storia Contemporanea 2015, 22 (2): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Dialog-Pheniben 2015, 19 : 22-23.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Joanna Talewicz-Kwiatkowska

Kimmo Granqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

-

SKY Journal of Linguistics 2015, 28 : 403-407.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Kimmo Granqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Finnish Review of East European Studies 2015, 3 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Maria Viljanen

Kimmo Granqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Finnish Review of East European Studies 2015, 3 : 3-17.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anton Tenser

Kimmo Granqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: De finska romernas historia från svenska tiden till 2000-talet. Stockholm : Bokförlaget Atlantis, 2015. 288-303.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Kimmo Granqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Upp genom mörkret / Ngugi wa Thiongo. Stockholm : Modernista, 2015. v-ix.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Archiva Moldaviae 2015, VII : 255-274.

This article is a contribution to the understanding of the bias and limitations that different kind of sources offer to the researcher in the contemporary history. Specifically, the study addresses how the researcher poses him/herself in front of the problems generated by different kinds of source materials, acknowledging Hans-Georg Gadamer’s Truth and Method, and proposes how to deal with the different kind of narratives proposed by the sources. The specific field of investigation chosen for this study is the history of historiography under communism, and specifically of the History Institute of the Romanian Communism Party, a central party institution for history-writing existing in Romania between 1951 and 1990. The researcher has at his/her disposition different typologies of sources for this study, first of all the archival sources conserved at the National Archives of Romania (the archive of the Institute, the funds of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party, the familial fund of the Institute’s director, Ion Popescu-Puţuri), and the funds present at the National Council for the Study of the Securitate Archives on the Institute’s historians. The article demonstrates, relying on a consolidated tradition of historical methodology, that these sources offer several limitations: they already offer a narrative, they are incomplete, and they have been subject to manipulation. A second resource for the historian are the memoires of the historians of the communist period, working at the Institute or in similar institutions. This second kind of sources, analysed trough the instruments offered by memory studies and post-colonial studies, is considerate as biased for numerous reasons: they were written after 1989, in some cases with an apologetic or justificatory intent; the researcher cannot easily distinguish information from the affection of memory, which is generated by the collective and vernacular memory that has been created after 1989. The authors of these autobiographies have imagined and framed the materials of their memory according to the discourses elaborated by a series of social frameworks (and networks) in which they lived, including the national one, and they contributed with their memories to the forging of a new image of the networks in which they are inserted. A third kind of sources is offered by the methodology of oral history, namely interviews with former historians of the Institute. In this case, the advantage for the researcher to create ad hoc sources for the purposes of the study is counterbalanced by the limitations of these sources, which are the same as for the autobiographies, with the addition of the performative aspect that is contextual within the interview. The article concludes that no source can claim the status of “truth”. Therefore, the distance between different typologies of sources result to be shortened. In conclusion, the researcher has only partially the possibility to obviate the bias offered by the sources with a strong research question. The researcher’s only possibility to establish a new narrative on a topic is to merge the horizon and the research questions and expectations with the narrative presented by the sources, as explained by Gadamer.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Rim Economies 2015, 5 : 42-42.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Histories of Public Diplomacy and Nation Branding in the Nordic and Baltic Countries. Leiden, Boston : Brill Academic Publishers, 2015. 257-279.

In recent years there has been increased political attention paid to the uses of public diplomacy by different countries for improving their economies, projecting identity, and achieving other policy goals. Within this framework this chapter seeks to explain Nordic involvement in/with the Baltic States in the past two decades. The communicative practice, interactions and building relations among these states provides a case that can be studied with respect to how states or associations of states understand cultures, attitudes and behaviour, build and manage relationships, and influence opinions and actions, which more or less intentionally advance their interests and values.The analysis in this chapter is anchored in the domain of international relations, with focus on the interdependencies created by the development aid and assistance that the Nordic states granted to Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania when they broke free from the Soviet Union. The increasing tendency on the part of the Nordic states to act as agenda setters in the Baltic region is also discussed, which  allows for viewing their actions as active international policy or, to use more contemporary terminology, as skilfully exercised public diplomacy. It proved all the more successful as the Baltic republics desired international recognition and longed to become fully-fledged parts of the West.The analysis of how norms and agendas propagated by the Nordic countries have become accepted in the Baltic states is pursued here with a working hypothesis claiming that the assumed civilizational achievement of the allegedly superior Western standards, gained from the cooperation with the Nordic states, made the Baltic actors readily accept the infusion of local institutions with Nordic norms, values and practices. The process was rapid and mostly one- directional to the extent that instead of mutual learning, typical for partners that cooperate on equal footing, the Nordic countries carried out an action that I describe as cognitive colonisation of the Baltic elites and publics. This meant that the political landscape and the decision makers’ agendas have been saturated with institutional structures, metaphors and other discursive short-cuts favourable to the Nordic countries – which represented Western Europe – to the extent that they became parts of the taken-for-granted cognitive schemas.Their institutional embeddedness was possible because a symbolic system, garnished with the English language functioning as a lingua francaof the Western civilisation, was transmitted along with the Nordic assistance, which consisted of patterns of behaviour, signs and meanings, delivered together with modes of their interpretation.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Kazimierz Musial

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Swedish

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Perspektiv på historia. Lund : Studentlitteratur AB, 2015. 35-53.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Digital politik. Göteborg : Daidalos, 2015. 173-191.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Sovijus 2015, 3 (2): 68-85.

The extent and content of boundary barrier functions can be explained by decisionsmade by the neighbouring states and their implementation on the local level. Withthe sudden changes of government and governance in 1989–1991 in Eastern andCentral Europe, the relation between individual and state changed drastically,from top-down, 'socialist' state-territorially contained relations into a moremultidimensional relationship where democratic bottom-up influences plays a moreimportant role, but where also commercial interests, mediated information andsupra-state ('international') regulation intervene. In the juxtaposition of territorialstates, the difference in jurisdiction between hierarchical levels has led to misfits,asymmetries that negatively impact the possibilities for cross-border co-operation.Using a cultural trait, that of religion as a measure of internal and cross-borderinteraction, the following questions were asked: What is the relation between theterritorial ("nation") state, civil society and education in border towns? Will the localteaching of religion be influenced by the proximity of a different state with anotherset of cultural and jurisdictional norms? The questions were approached withexamples from the teaching of religion, ethics and civics in northeastern Europeanborder areas, involving border twin towns in Norway, Russia, Finland, Estonia,Latvia, Poland and Germany. The present study involved four different academicdisciplines; the study of religion, education, geography and political science.Information about the teaching of religion and ethics was made throughstructured interviews with teachers and principals of selected schools made byassistants fluent in the language(s) of the locality. Questions were also asked aboutthe use of religious and other symbols, the celebration of holidays and other eventsThe study resulted in a general rejection of the hypotheses. Education,especially related to religion, civics and ethics, is almost completely influenced by thehomogeneous territorial jurisdiction of each state. Local civil society plays a minorrole in the teaching. Local religious groups are usually not invited to the schools,and parents show little interest in the teaching contents of school life. The existenceof cross-border migrants is to some extent taken into consideration in languageteaching, but not in civics or religion. While cross-border relations are friendly, theyare rarely intense.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Dagens Nyheter 2015, 26 oktober : 16-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Political Culture of Nordic Self-Understanding. London : Routledge, 2015. 20-34.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Histories of Public Diplomacy and Nation Branding in the Nordic and Baltic Countries. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2015. 172-194.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Ajalooline Ajakiri. The Estonian Historical Journal 2015, 153 (3): 223-248.

This article analyzes Swedish political scientist and conservative politician Rudolf Kjellén’s advocacy in favour of a Swedish "Baltic program" directed at the Baltic Sea region and Russia in the decades preceding the First World War. These Baltic ambitions as well as their legacy in the interwar period are studied as a series of exercises in "para-diplomacy" on three different levels: 1) as a geopolitical reconstruction of a Baltic-Nordic "space of expectation;" 2) as a kind of Baltic-Nordic regionalism based upon early notions of "soft power;" and 3) as an inspiration to the geopolitical outlook of the Swedish military elite, business circles and trade policy-makers in the time period from the First World War up to the Second World War. This "region-work in the margins" contributed to modernizing Swedish conservative elites’ geopolitical outlook into an ostensibly less aggressive vision of Swedish international influence through cultural, economic, and technological prowess.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Ajalooline Ajakiri. The Estonian Historical Journal 2015, 153 (3): 213-222.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mart Kuldkepp

Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Tartu : University of Tartu Press, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mart Kuldkepp

Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Dagens Nyheter 2015, 10 februari : 8-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2015, 1-2 : 36-37.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Ab Imperio 2015, 2015 (2): 339-362.

When discussing Bolshevik cultural politics, both scholars and the public today emphasize what the Bolsheviks destroyed. In this essay, however, the focus is on what they “preserved,” and especially how they preserved it, to what purpose, and with what consequences. The article reconstructs the ideology and practices of cultural heritage in Soviet Russia from the vantage point of Bolshevik policies in reuses of the past. As an example, in reading the writing of the authority in Soviet cultural heritage industry, Igor Grabar, the author reconstructs the process of aestheticization, commodification, and internationalization of the Russian Orthodox icon.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Krajobraz spolecznosciowy - Polska 2014 [Social landscape Poland 2014]. Warszawa : Centrum Wspierania Aktywności Lokalnej/CAL, 2015. 27-46.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Urban Grassroots Movements in Central and Eastern Europe. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. 195-218.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Geografiska Notiser 2015, LXXIII (3): 109-119.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Environmental Policy and Governance 2015, 25 (4): 270-287.

Agricultural systems can be seen as nested social-ecological systems. European Union (EU) Member States vary considerably in terms of their agricultural, socio-economic and environmental circumstances. Yet, as participants in the common agricultural market, they are subject to a uniform Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). An important question is whether there is enough room for flexibility to sustain diverse agricultural systems and facilitate national targeting of sustainability-promoting measures. This article analyses the institutional arrangements concerning cross-scale interactions and interdependencies at national and regional (EU) levels, focusing on how Poland and Sweden implement CAP funds in relation to sustainable agriculture, in particular the agri-environmental schemes, for the period 2007-2013. What room is there in practice for accommodating national differences and sustainability priorities offered by the EU agricultural policy, and how are the existing opportunities used by the two countries? It is shown that agri-environmental funds are too small to prevent transition towards large-scale farming in new Member States and CAP does not effectively promote transformation towards sustainable practices in the EU.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Erika Öhlund

Karolina Zurek

Monica Hammer

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina Tarasova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Europe-Asia Studies 2015, 67 (6): 995-996.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina Tarasova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In 2004, Mikheil Saakashvili was elected president in Georgia, committing to a foreign policy that would ostensibly make his country a leading example of reform and democratization in the post-Soviet space, and a net-contributor to Euro-Atlantic security. Throughout its time in power and until its defeat in Georgia’s 2012 parliamentary elections, the Saakashvili government remained steadfast in its commitment to establishing these international roles for Georgia, despite developments in both the country’s international and domestic contexts that could plausibly have made these roles, and the foreign policy decisions deriving from them, redundant.This dissertation explores the relationship between national role conceptions (NRCs) and foreign policy stability. It demonstrates how Georgia’s NRCs as a Beacon of Liberty and a Net-Security Contributor, evolving specifically in the relationship between the Georgian and U.S. governments during these years, contributed to stability in Georgia’s foreign policy. Yet these NRCs were also subjected to serious challenges, particularly relating to two crises ensuing over the November 2007 riots in Tbilisi and the August 2008 war between Georgia and Russia. In both cases, the Georgian government was subjected to conflicting imperatives emanating from its own role conceptions, the expectations voiced by its U.S. counterparts, and the immediate demands of crisis decision making.Drawing on recent advances in foreign policy role theory and crisis management theory, two social mechanisms are developed, role location and role conflict management. Role location is a long-term process of interaction between the actor and significant others, resulting in a gradual harmonization of role expectations and intentions. Role conflict management instead represents the actor’s handling of potentially disruptive moments, raising questions about the credibility and legitimacy of existing NRCs in the eyes of others, and confronting the actor with choices regarding stability and change in existing NRCs.The framework is applied in an analysis of the Georgian government’s foreign policy vis-à-vis the U.S. in the years 2004-2012, with particular attention to the disruptive effects of the crises in 2007-2008, and the actions taken to address the resulting role conflicts. The analysis draws on unique first-hand material, including interviews with members of the Georgian and U.S. foreign policy elites, confidential diplomatic correspondence and official speeches, to uncover the processes by which the mechanisms of role location and role conflict management played out in Georgia’s foreign policy. The dissertation concludes that the stability in Georgia’s foreign policy stemmed from the fact that the two NRCs became deeply socially embedded in Georgia’s relations with the U.S. over time, but also from the Georgian government’s ability to adapt its NRCs in response to crises, the role expectations of significant others, and contextual change. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Eriksson

Niklas Nilsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Baltic Worlds 2015, 8 (1-2): 34-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia MalitskaOlena PodolianYuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary StudiesSchool of Social Sciences
HistoryPolitical Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2015, VIII (1-2): 19-32.

Two distinct cases of kin-state relations are examined: that of Russians living in states neighboring Russia and that of Magyars living in states around Hungary. The role of kin-state relations in Europe is studied from a historical perspective and, with reference to Rogers Brubaker's concept of a triadic nexus between nationalizing states, a national minority, and an external homeland. It is argued that the fall of communism – and the fall of several multi-ethnic federations, in particular – revived old territorial conflicts and hostility among national groups both within and between states. The question of kin-state relations is put at the forefront of European minority issues.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kjetil Duvold


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Boundaries Revisited. Berlin : Logos Verlag Berlin, 2015. 41-55.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review 2015, 42 (1): 5-38.

The article examines how informal networks inside the Russian state influenced the formation and further development of the country' s financial markets during the 1990s and 2000s. The main argument is that the activities of these networks made it difficult to implement any coherent state regulation policy in the field. At the same time, rivalry between competing informal networks and different organizations contributed to institutional development and some improvements. The result was a dualist institutional structure of the Russian speculative financial markets that reproduced itself throughout the period in question. The study is based on in-depth interviews conducted at Moscow-based financial institutions.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ilja Viktorov

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Förledd och förtjust. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2015. 73-85.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Alexander Stagnell

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Rhetoric

Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Review of Sociology 2015, 25 (2): 235-251.

The geopolitical history of religion in the Baltic Sea area shows a development from the time of the Lutheran Reformation of a mosaic of states with very different jurisdictions of creed, from the tolerance under local containment of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth to the strict Evangelical mono-religion of the Scandinavian countries. With seventeenth-century mercantilism, groups of skilled people of ‘foreign’ religion were invited to newly founded towns and ironworks in order to promote the economy. In the eighteenth-century enlightened absolute monarchs, defying both church and bourgeoisie, allowed groups of Catholics and Jews to Scandinavia under spatial restrictions on settlement. In Russia non-Russians of different religions were tolerated, while dissidents to the Orthodox Church were deported to peripheral places. With the Prussian territorial expansion in Germany, more groups were included into citizenship, including Jews. The last states to include groups of ‘foreign’ creed were the early nineteenth century semi-independent states of Norway and Finland.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Dis-orientations. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015. 187-218.

A comparative reading of Walter Benjamin's linguistic theology and Sören Kirkegaard's theory of the revolutionary age.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The vernaculars of Communism. London : Routledge, 2015. 63-88.

Aesopian language (or Aesopian speech) is an important component of Soviet language culture, a cultureof expression under surveillance and censorhip that invented various modes of the  circumlocution and euphemization of politically sensitive topics. In this chapter, I am illustrating some of the innumerable ways of organizing communcation under the sign of (sometimes imagined) prosecution. I am describing various practices of Aesopian circumlocution and summarizing theoretical work in Soviet literary history that addressed this peculiar phenomenon in Russian and Soviet literary tradition. I am also discussing the aesthetics and politics of Aesopian language and its role as a means of expressing political dissent as this was seen by its practitioners inside the USSR and by the theorists who worked with the matters of language and power in the West.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Crossings and Crosses. : Walter de Gruyter, 2015. 191-211.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Crossings and Crosses. : Walter de Gruyter, 2015. 171-190.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2015, VIII (1-2): 105-106.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Boston : Walter de Gruyter, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Peter StrandbrinkJenny BerglundThomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary StudiesSchool of Social Sciences
Comparative ReligionPolitical Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Pittsburgh : University of Pittsburgh Press, 2015.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sergei Glebov

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Between Europe and Asia. Pittsburgh : University of Pittsburgh Press, 2015. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

In: Antiziganism. Newcastle : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015. 61-63.

Deals with the politics of compensation for Nazi war crimes against Sinti and Roma

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Nordisk Østforum 2015, 29 (1): 33-56.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Nordström

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Nationalities Papers 2015, 43 (6): 840-865.

The striking affinities that have developed between radical-conservative movements in Western Europe and Russia since the end of the Cold War have been widely noted. This essay considers these affinities through the example of the Soviet historian and geographer Lev Nikolaevich Gumilev (1912–1992). It argues that Gumilev and the European New Right developed perspectives that were highly comparable, founded on similar principles, and articulated through similar images and allusions. Yet despite the powerful resonances in terms of basic concepts and theoretical orientation, there were nonetheless deep differences in terms of the conclusions regarding the practical implications for their respective societies that Gumilev and the Europeans deduced from these principles.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

YMER 2015, 135 : 7-22.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Historisk Tidsskrift (DK) 2015, 114 (2): 621-622.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Steffen Werther

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

City 2015, 19 (2-3): 274-296.

Squatting, or the use of property without the legal permission, and tenants’ activism are under-researched areas, in particular in the post-socialist context. Poland has been pointed out as extraordinary on the map of squatting in post-socialist Europe and a considerable number of tenants’ organizations are active in the country. What is most interesting is that squatters’ and tenants’ activists are forming alliances, despite their obvious differences in their organizational models, social composition, along with the specific motives and goals of their activism. The objective of this article is to examine the relations between the tenants’ and squatting movements in Poland by studying two cities where both movements are established and closely cooperating. In particular we are interested in the transformative power of such cooperation and we assume that cooperation between social movements results in negotiations and transformations of the social movement actors involved. The empirical foundations for this article are 50 interviews, whereof 30 interviews conducted in Warsaw with squatters and tenants’ movement activists and 20 interviews conducted with activists in Poznań. Warsaw and Poznań are, moreover, two Polish cities where the squatting movement is most vibrant and where squatters and tenants have achieved some considerable successes in their activities. The article argues against previous studies emphasizing access to abundant resources and identity alignment as crucial for the mobilization of collective and collaborative action. Instead, it argues that the lack of resources might also be driving social movements towards cooperation, as a kind of compensation. Moreover, our cases demonstrate that ideology and identity alignment in social movements create stagnation with regard to openness towards new allies. We therefore argue that a high degree of identity alignment and ideological consistency might discourage the formation of new alliances.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika PolanskaGrzegorz Piotrowski

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Environmental Politics 2015, 24 (2): 337-341.

The parliamentary election of 14 September 2014 induced decidedly mixed feelings in the Swedish Green Party (Miljöpartiet de gröna). It led to the ejection of the centre-right government and the installation, for the first time, of Green cabinet ministers. However, the party also experienced a small but unexpected loss of votes compared to its score in the previous election. Moreover, partly because a far-right party built impressively on its breakthrough into the national parliament in 2010, the new government rests on a precariously narrow parliamentary base.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Niklas Bolin

Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Le génocide des Arméniens. Paris : Armand Colin, 2015. 70-91.

Describes the problems of studying the Assyrian Genocide in the Ottoman Empire.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

This thesis studies different aspects of reproductive behaviour on the international, national, and local levels in post-communist countries. The main focus is Ukraine, where fertility rates are very low and the population is in severe decline. The studies contribute new knowledge about the applicability of a family policy typology developed on the basis of Western countries’ experience for post-communist countries, and about the influence of family policies on fertility levels in these countries. Moreover, the studies investigate whether and how macro-level influences impact on individuals’ reproductive behaviour. Four articles are included in the thesis:Family policies in Ukraine and Russia in comparative perspective analyses the institutional set-up of family policies in both countries and compares the findings to 31 other countries. The results show that Ukrainian family policies support a male-breadwinner type of family, while the benefit levels of Russian family policies are low, compelling families to rely on relatives or the childcare market.Family policies and fertility - Examining the link between family policy institutions and fertility rates in 33 countries 1995-2010 comparatively explores whether family policies have an effect on fertility rates across the case-countries. Pooled time-series regression analysis demonstrates that gender-egalitarian family policies are connected to higher fertility rates, but that this effect is smaller at higher rates of female labour force participation.To have or not to have a child? Perceived constraints on childbearing in a lowest-low fertility context investigates the influence of the perception of postmodern values, childcare availability and environmental pollution on individuals’ fertility intentions in a city in Eastern Ukraine. It is shown that women who already have a child perceive environmental pollution as a constraint on their fertility intentions.Prevalence and correlates of the use of contraceptive methods by women in Ukraine in 1999 and 2007 examines changes in the prevalence and the correlates of the use of contraceptive methods. The use of modern contraceptive methods increased during the period and the use of traditional methods decreased, while the overall prevalence did not change. Higher exposure to messages about family planning in the media is correlated with the use of modern contraceptive methods.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen

Katharina Wesolowski


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

West European Politics 2015, 38 (3): 730-740.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Niklas Bolin

Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Genocide Studies International 2015, 9 (1): 83-103.

Article describes and analyzes the Assyrian genocide in Ottoman Turkey during World War I.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Today, individuals can relatively easily meet and communicate with each other over great distances due to increased mobility and advances in communication technology. This also allows intimate relationships to be maintained over large geographical distances. Despite these developments, long-distance relationships (LDRs), i.e. intimate relationships maintained over geographical distance, remain understudied. The present thesis aims to fill this knowledge gap and investigates how intimate partners who live so far away from each other that they cannot meet every day make their relationship ongoing beyond face-to-face interaction.Theoretically, this study departs from a symbolic interactionist viewpoint that invites us to study phenomena from the actor’s perspective. Conceptually, the thesis builds on the recent development in sociology of intimate lives that sees intimacy as a relational quality that has to be worked on to be sustained, and that focuses on the practices that make a relationship a relationship. Empirically, the thesis is based upon 19 in-depth interviews with individuals from Latvia with long-distance relationship experience.The thesis consists of four articles. Article I studies the context in which LDRs in Latvia are maintained, focusing on the normative constraints that complicate LDR maintenance. Article II analyses how intimacy is practiced over geographical distance. Article III examines how long-distance partners manage the experience of the time they are together and the time they are geographically apart. Article IV explores the aspect of idealization in LDRs. Overall, the thesis argues for the critical role of imagination in relationship maintenance. The relationship maintenance strategies identified within the articles are imagination-based mediated communication (creating sensual/embodied intimacy, emotional intimacy, daily intimacy and imagined individual intimacy); time-work strategies that enable long-distance partners to deal with the spatiotemporal borders of the time together and the time apart; and creating bi-directional idealization. The thesis is also one of the few works in the field of intimate lives in Eastern Europe and analyses the normative complications that long-distance partners face in their relationship maintenance in Latvia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kerstin Jacobsson

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Historisk Tidskrift (S) 2015, 135 (1): 63-91.

This article analyzes Swedish–German interactions with focus on Nazi-Germany's methods of infiltrating Swedish–German associations, based on sources in German and Swedish archives. German university teachers in the Deutsche Akademie, and the Deutscher Akademischer Austauchdienst were sent to Sweden as agents by Nazi Germany. Parallel to their work as language teachers they should "secretly conquer the Swedish soul". Because they were obliged to send regular reports from Sweden there is a huge amount of documents in German archives revealing not only Swedish attitudes to Nazism, but also how for example Swedish-German associations became special targets for the infiltration. The analyses reveal differences between the associations: In Göteborg and Uppsala they did not want to cooperate. When John Holmberg, professor of German in Uppsala, criticized the anti-Semitic ideology and rector Curt Weibull in Göteborg defended the university against the Nazi infiltration they were reported to Berlin as dangerous enemies. In Stockholm however speakers as representatives for the Nazi regime were welcomed. One of the invited speakers 1935 was Rudolf Hess who spoke of "The New Germany". After the fall of the Nazi regime there was no self reflection what so ever in the written programs of the Association in Stockholm.One explanation why many in Sweden did not resist the Nazi propaganda was that the Nazis worked under the cloak of traditional German culture and rhetoric. Glorification of the Nordic ideal and traditional values were recommended propaganda tools. The semantic changes of the words were not always observed in Sweden, but documents in German archives show that there were strong critical voices.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Europe-Asia Studies 2015, 67 (10): 1547-1570.

This essay examines the prevalence and the correlates of the use of contraceptive methods in Ukraine in 1999 and 2007. Between those years, the overall use of contraceptive methods decreased slightly. However, the use of modern contraceptive methods, and especially the use of condoms, increased considerably, while the use of traditional contraceptive methods decreased. Higher exposure to messages about family planning in the media was correlated with the use of modern contraceptive methods. It is posited that the results suggest that state policies influence individual behaviour in contraception.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katharina Wesolowski


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Sexuality & Culture 2015, 19 (2): 388-406.

Not all couples live together; some partners live far from each other, causing potential challenges to relationship maintenance in terms of keeping the relationship ongoing. In the present study, complications in relationship maintenance experienced by heterosexual long-distance partners in post-Soviet Latvia are analysed. The complications are examined in the light of social norms as conceptualized by Parsons and Shils (Toward a general theory of action. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1962) in their notion of dominant value orientations. The article suggests that the norm conflicts experienced by the long-distance partners are illustrative of the value transitions in societies undergoing rapid social change, such as in Latvia. The analysis is based on 19 in-depth interviews with individuals with long-distance relationship (LDR) experience. The social norms complicating or hindering LDR maintenance were found to be generation-specific and gender-specific. The interviewees born and raised in Soviet Latvia referred to collective-oriented norms while the interviewees born in the independent neo-liberal Latvia referred to their own interests that complicated their LDR maintenance.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

2015, : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Innovative Issues and Approaches in Social Sciences 2015, 8 (1): 223-241.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Qualitative Sociology 2015, 38 (2): 185-203.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Iveta Jurkane-Hobein


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Parliamentary talk, despite its central place in politics, has not been the focus of many qualitative studies. The present study investigates how parliamentary talk emerges in a dialogue between different arguments in the parliament. At the same time, this is a study of politics, of how human interaction gives birth to laws that regulate life in two contemporary democracies, Slovakia and Poland. It provides a close-reading of two political debates: on the state language in Slovakia and on gender parity in Poland.This study draws on hermeneutic and semiotic thinkers such as Gadamer, Bakhtin and Lotman to elaborate a dialogical understanding of language that can provide the basis for a method of textual analysis. The dialogical understanding of language emphasises that text and talk must be studied in the context of an interaction. The unit of analysis is a pair of utterances, a question and an answer. Until an utterance has been interpreted, it carries only the potential of meaning; its meaning is materialised by the responses it receives.The study further argues that conversation analysis and its tools can usefully be applied to the study of political debate. The method provides for the analysis of the dynamics between micro-scale interaction in the parliament and the macro-scale dynamics of culture. These dynamics assume two different forms that Lotman termed as “translation” and “explosion”.The study shows that parliamentary debate is characterised by a constantly evolving topic of discussion, namely that the meaning of the bill at the start of the debate and at the end of the debate are really two different bills. This is not because the content of the bill has undergone changes, but because in the course of the debate, the bill has generated new cultural connections. Casting a vote in support of the bill does not approve just the bill itself but a whole set of interconnected political, social and cultural values—what Lotman approached as the semiosphere. This study suggests Lotman’s cultural semiotics can provide for “imperfect hermeneutics” that is sensitive to the dynamic and contested nature of tradition in politics whilst acknowledging the inevitability of culture in mediating political talk. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Inga Brandell

Jaakko Turunen

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Nordisk Østforum 2015, 2 : 143-165.

Drawing on cross-national public opinion surveys from the spring of 2014, this article analyses popular support for democracy in the three Baltic states – more specifically the attitudinal differences between the ethnic majorities and the Russian-speaking minorities in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. It assesses the democratic political culture of the three countries 25 years after the fall of communism in Europe, 10 years after EU membership, a few years after the global financial crisis, and in the midst of the recent Russian–Ukrainian crisis. The data demonstrate widespread public dissatisfaction with democracy throughout the region, especially in Latvia, the country hardest hit by the crisis in 2008–2009. As a rule, the Russian-speaking minorities in the three Baltic states tend to be more critical of democracy than ethnic Estonians, Latvians and Lithuanians.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Acta Politica 2015, 50 (3): 253-278.

The role of ‘fair’ institutions in developing democratic legitimacy has received increased attention. Citizens who perceive – on basis of past experiences – that they are being treated fairly by authorities have been held to have greater trust in political institutions. However, previous studies on the relationship between procedural fairness and political trust have not paid sufficient attention to individuals with limited first-hand experiences of authorities. We examine the relationship on an authority that virtually all individuals meet early in life: the school. Using structural equation modeling on unique panel data covering 1500 Swedish adolescents (ages ranging from 13 to 17), we find a reciprocal relationship: personal encounters with school authorities shape young people’s political trust; however, the images that adolescents get of the political system (through family, peers, media and so on) have also consequences on their perceptions about the authorities they encounter in their daily lives. The analysis increases our understanding of how individuals form their political allegiances by showing that the relationship between fairness and trust is more dynamic than has previously been suggested: neither an accumulated set of experiences of authorities nor formal ties with political institutions (as voters and so on) are required for a relationship to emerge.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ali Abdelzadeh

Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Foucault Studies 2015, 20 : 76-95.

This article deals with civil society organizations active in the field of family policy and demographic issues in contemporary Russia, using Michel Foucault’s concepts of biopolitics and governmentality. More specifically, so called “daddy-schools” that have emerged in and around Saint Petersburg since 2008, are studied, using interviews and documents. The analysis shows that the organizations work as a complement to the state but have also been able to influence policy, alter legislation and challenge the established assumptions and governmentality of the Russian state concerning parenthood, the “good” father and how to deal with the ongoing demographic crisis and increase fertility.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Journal of Civil Society 2015, 11 (1): 19-38.

History and traditions are important for many civil society organizations (CSOs). However, they have to mediate between their original mission and modern-day realities. This article argues that the concept of decoupling can enrich analyses of how organizations deal with path dependency. Hence, theoretically, the article discusses cross-fertilization between historical and organizational institutionalism. This is illustrated through a study of Swedish CSOs using survey data, interviews and documents. The Swedish popular movement tradition is argued to be a path that is not easily abandoned, and the results show how actors in CSOs find history to be both a resource and a constraint. Furthermore, different decoupling strategies, including both reversed and official decoupling, are used to balance between historical legacies and current challenges.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Geopolitics 2015, 20 (2): 248-266.

This paper looks at how Swedish political scientist Rudolf Kjellén (1864–1922) conceived of the relationship between nature and culture, between material and immaterial power as well as the role of soft power, geopolitical imaginary and competitive identity in off-setting potentially unfavourable geopolitical conditions for small and medium-sized states. It is argued that with regard to small states, Kjellén did not maintain a consistent separation between “soft” cultural resources of power and “hard” laws of nature. Rather, he placed the mutually constitutive tension between geography (nature) and politics (culture) at the centre of his politico-scientific analysis, arguing that active “biopolitics” could supplement geopolitics. In Kjellén’s conception, cultural and natural resources are instruments of an otherwise integrated notion of power which challenges the contemporary separation between hard and soft power.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical StudiesPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Journal of Housing and the Built Environment 2015, 30 (2): 355-356.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2015

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Population, Space and Place 2015, 21 (1): 86-101.

The influence of perceived macro-level constraints on childbearing on women’s fertility decision-making on the micro level was analysed in Stakhanov, a city with a shrinking population in Eastern Ukraine. The perceived macro-level constraints employed in the study were related to childcare arrangements, value changes regarding family formation, and pollution of the environment and health concerns. To study the influence of those constraints, logistic regression analyses were conducted whereby first-birth and second-birth intentions were analysed separately. None of the constraints influenced childless women’s first-birth intentions. Instead, sociodemographic factors such as age and civil status appeared as significant predictors. That none of the constraints influenced childless women’s fertility intentions is interpreted to be an indicator of the strong norm of having at least one child in Ukraine.For women with one child, the fact that pollution of the environment and health concerns connected to childbirth were perceived as a constraint on childbearing at the national level was significantly associated with lower second-birth intentions. Women in Ukraine seem to perceive environmental pollution as a constraint on their fertility, possibly influenced by public discourse related to the health consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Moreover, the inhabitants of Stakhanov itself have experienced environmental pollution at close range. Those factors together could explain why environmental pollution and poor health were seen as constraints on childbearing at the national level, and the negative influence these had on second-birth intentions.It is argued that environmental pollution should be considered a factor influencing fertility decision-making. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katharina Wesolowski


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Archives of Suicide Research 2015, 19 (1): 117-130.

Russia has one of the highest suicide mortality rates in the world. This study investigates the development of Russian suicide mortality over a longer time period in order to provide a context within which the contemporary high level might be better understood. Annual sex- and age-specific suicide-mortality data for Russia for the period 1870-2007 were studied, where available. Russian suicide mortality increased 11-fold over the period. Trends in male and female suicide developed similarly, although male suicide rates were consistently much higher. From the 1990s suicide has increased in a relative sense among the young (15-34), while the high suicide mortality among middle-aged males has reduced. Changes in Russian suicide mortality over the study period may be attributable to modernisation processes.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andrew Stickley

Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen

Tanya Jukkala


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Greifswald : Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marco Nase

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Models of Democracy in Nordic and Baltic Europe . Farnham : Ashgate, 2014. 1-38.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Models of Democracy in Nordic and Baltic Europe . Farnham : Ashgate, 2014. 117-152.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jānis Ikstens

Emelie Lilliefeldt

Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Models of Democracy in Nordic and Baltic Europe . Farnham : Ashgate, 2014. 219-240.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: . : .

Civil society organizations are discussed as actors who can reduce democratic deficits in global/regional governance institutions, not least the EU which is the focus of this paper. However, organizations with different aims and ideologies often come together in large meta-organizations to address EU-institutions. This paper studies how the identity and ideological acerbity of CSOs is affected by membership in heterogeneous meta-organizations through a case study of CONCORD Europe, active in the development cooperation field at the EU level. Theoretically, neo-institutional theory and research on meta-organizations is used. Empirically, documents and interviews with representatives of CONCORD and CONCORD’s membership are analyzed.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: . : .

This paper will deal with civil society organizations active in the field of family policy and demographic issues in contemporary Russia, using Michel Foucault’s concepts of biopolitics and governmentality. More specifically, so called “daddy-schools” that have emerged in and around Saint Petersburg since 2008, are studied, using interviews and documents. A preliminary analysis shows that the organizations work as complements to the state but have also influenced policy, altered legislation and challenged established assumptions and the governmentality of the Russian state concerning parenthood, the “good” father and how to deal with the ongoing demographic crisis.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: ISTR Conference Working Paper Series. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

H-Soz-u-Kult, H-Net Reviews 2014, April : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Steffen Werther

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: RC36 Alienation Theory and Research (host committee). : .

The report is going to consider ‘tolerance’ as an ideological frame. A critical assessment will be done of tolerance on the part of Belarusian people.It is going to be shown that a) tolerance as an invariably beneficent trait of the Belarusian people is quite mistaken, b) that the ‘tolerance’ frame interferes with democratic governance principles as accepted and practiced worldwide, c) that responses to public dissatisfaction (part and parcel of normal governance systems) in Belarus are complicated due to persistence of the ‘tolerance’ frame; and d) that for the more fortunate and sustainable democratic outcomes in Belarus a regular public/authority feedback should be restored by getting rid of ‘tolerance’ as part of the ideological apparatus.The idea of this paper concerns ‘tolerance’ as it enters democratic governance schemes and might be leading to their malfunction. The word tolerance is widely used in liberal democracies and is ascribed a positive meaning. However, it appears that tolerance is not necessarily a virtue. The word tolerance has negative connotations as it acknowledges a problem. The danger with the ideological frame ‘tolerance’ is that it might enter democratic governance models where it can effectively block public responses to dissatisfaction. This way, the system is incapable of conveying public dissatisfaction, and the stimulus is removed for the authorities to improve their work. This might be evident in Belarus, where people have little opportunity to convey their dissatisfaction, given that they are considered as well as consider themselves ‘tolerant’. In this case, their tolerance, being mere holding on, is a potential volcano.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Aleh Ivanou

Nikolay Zakharov

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Scandia 2014, 80 (2): 130-132.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Historisk Tidskrift (S) 2014, 134 (4): 774-776.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Information som problem. Stockholm : Kungl. biblioteket, 2014. 1986-215.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

ВЕСТНИК ПЕРМСКОГО УНИВЕРСИТЕТА. СЕРИЯ: ИСТОРИЯ 2014, 4 (27): 174-179.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Diacronie 2014, 3 (19): 5-.

The article aims at elaborating a new theoretical framework and a new methodology in order to identify the location of history discipline endorsed by the East European communist regimes between scholarly production and propaganda. The case study considered is the historiography produced by the History Institute of the Romanian Communist Party (Isisp) during the Ceausescu regime (1965-1989). This highly ideological, but still polymorphic historiography is placed into the context of the 19th and 20th centuries’ professionalization of history in Europe. Since historiography has been the main mean to develop nationalist messages, this paper is also a contribution to the study of nationalism. Since history-writing is a myth-breaker but also a (national) myths-maker, the theory considers that the Isisp historians were elaborating an academic, scholarly standard while performing the mandatory metanarrative canon imposed by the communist Party, creating a double-set of coherence, for the party and for their own profession. The theory implies also a methodology of analysis which integrates the study of the history-writings, considered in diachronical perspective, together with the collective biographies of Isisp and of its historians.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Cadernos do Tempo Presente 2014, 17 : 41-54.

Romania: land of conquest by Romans, Huns, Turks, last outpost of Christendom in Eastern Europe, part of the Eastern front during the 20th century wars, a Soviet satellite and, finally, member of the European Union and of NATO. Romania has always been subject to different ideas of identity meant to define its essence: latinity or dacianism? Europe or authochthonism? The essay aims at analysing the debate regarding the ethnogenesis of the Romanian people since its origin in the 17th century, through the debates of the 19th century and the interwar period and, finally, analysing the debate between latinity and dacianism during the Ceauşescu regime in the light of the cultural politics of the regime and of the debate between different factions of intellectuals.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Sulle spalle degli antichi. Milan : Edizioni Unicopli, 2014. 85-100.

Romania: land of conquest by Romans, Huns, Turks, last outpost of Christendom in Eastern Europe, part of the Eastern front during the 20th century wars, a Soviet satellite and, finally, member of the European Union and of NATO. Romania has always been subject to different ideas of identity meant to define its essence: latinity or dacianism? Europe or authochthonism? The essay aims at analysing the debate regarding the ethnogenesis of the Romanian people since its origin in the 17th century, through the debates of the 19th century and the interwar period and, finally, analysing the debate between latinity and dacianism during the Ceauşescu regime in the light of the cultural politics of the regime and of the debate between different factions of intellectuals.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Oscar Törnqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESMARISSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Archaeology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Marinarkeologisk tidskrift 2014, 3 : 17-22.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Oscar Törnqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESMARISSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Archaeology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Marinarkeologisk tidskrift 2014, 1 : 4-12.

Antalet undersökningar av lite äldre skeppsvrak i norden är försvinnande få, om man räknar djupare studier av last och lösföremål. Ett välundersökt vrak, daterat till 1500-talets första hälft, är det som har fått namnet ”Ringaren”. Vraket ligger vid Flatvarp i skärgården strax norr om Västervik. Undersökningen som resulterade i en doktorsavhandling presenterade tolkningen att skeppet var ett hanseatiskt handelsskepp, då lasten synbarligen var från Hansans områden. Denna tolkning har fått råda sedan dess. Men vad händer om man mer i detalj tolkar vraket utifrån dess skeppsteknologiska signatur samt dess rumsliga och kronologiska sammanhang i kombination med dess last?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Oscar Törnqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESMARISSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Archaeology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Ukrainian society faced a new reality. The new reality involved consolidation and transformation of collective identities. The reinvigoration of national identity led to a change in the emphasis on how the past was dealt with – many things which were regarded as negative by the Soviet regime became presented as positive in independent Ukraine. The war-time nationalist movement, represented by the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA), became one of the re-configured themes of history.While most of the studies of memory of the OUN and UPA concentrated on the use of the history of the OUN and UPA by nationalist parties, this study goes beyond the analysis of such use of history and scrutinizes the meaning of this history in nation- and state-building processes in relation to memory work realized on the small-scale regional and local levels with the main focus on Rivne and Rivne oblast’. Moreover, this book focusses not only on the “producers” of memory, but also on the “consumers” of memory, the area which is largely understudied in the field of memory studies. In the book the main emphasis is put on monuments which are regarded as catalysts and symptoms of memory.The present study showed that the OUN and UPA are used more as the metaphors of the anti-Soviet and anti-communist struggle for independence than as historical entities. This past is largely mythologized. Functioning as a myth the memory of the OUN and UPA obliterates difficult knowledge that the historical research reveals on the questionable activities and ideology of those organizations. As a result, the past of the OUN and UPA is re-imagined, re-filled with new meanings so that it is used along even with the democratic and pro-European claims in the present. It was especially well-observed during the Orange Revolution in 2004 and during the Euromaidan in 2013-2014, when the European Union’s flags were seen next to the OUN’s red-and-black flags or when the pro-European slogans were proclaimed alongside the OUN and UPA slogans.At the same time, the results demonstrated an intricate complexity of memory work shaped by intensive dynamics of private and public, grassroots and official, local and national encounters. Although there have been attempts made by political actors to draw a direct link between the national identity, political allegiances and proposed heroic version of memory, the study showed, that such attempts did not really work. In the pluralistic context the meanings are too fluid and adherence to one version of history does not preclude adherences to other versions of history which are presented as diametrically opposite in the political sphere. As result, on the recipients’ grassroots level, the memory reveals its amalgamated characteristics.Drawing on studies about post-colonial subjectivities and theories of remediation developed in memory studies, this book explores the changes in memory culture of contemporary Ukraine and examines the role of memory in producing new meanings under the rapidly changing conditions after the collapse of the Soviet Union up to 2014.The book contributes to the studies of memory culture in post-Communist countries as well as to the studies of society in contemporary Ukraine. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt

Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Dagens Nyheter 2014, 5 apri : 6-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Håkan Thörn

Adrienne SörbomJoakim EkmanMagnus Wennerhag

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political ScienceSociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Kaleidoscope: Journal of History of Culture, Science and Medicine 2014, 9 : 153-158.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Andrea Petö

Nadezda Petrusenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Kaleidoscope: Journal of History of Culture, Science and Medicine 2014, 9 : 232-249.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, the Russian authorities were facing serious problems because of systematic political terrorism, which was mostly connected to the activities of the Party of Socialists-Revolutionaries (the PSR). The most striking feature of that terrorism was that many of the terrorists were women – a feature that makes it justified to maintain that by taking part in political terrorism women entered the domains that in patriarchal societies were considered to be exclusively male: the domain of violence and the domain of politics. Such intrusion to the male territory was especially shocking for the traditional patriarchal society of pre-revolutionary Russia.Despite this striking feature however, systematic historical research on gendered representations of the Russian female terrorists at the beginning of the 20th century is still in short supply whereas in other academic disciplines portrayals of women as agents of political violence are a frequent topic in the research on contemporary terrorism. To help fill up this void, the purpose of the article is by using the case of Maria Spiridonova, the most famous female terrorist in pre-revolutionary Russia, to see whether the conclusions made by non-historians about gendered representations of contemporary female terrorists can be used for historical research in order to identify eventual distortions in the representations of violent female agency in the past and, thus, obtain deeper knowledge about gender order in historical perspective

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nadezda Petrusenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: The Anti-Landscape. Amsterdam/New York : Rodopi, 2014. 161-176.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Storm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.

Post-industrial landscape scars are traces of 20th century utopian visions of society; they relate to fear and resistance expressed by popular movements and to relations between industrial workers and those in power. The metaphor of the scar pinpoints the inherent ambiguity of memory work by signifying both positive and negative experiences, as well as the contemporary challenges of living with these physical and mental marks. In this book, Anna Storm explores post-industrial landscape scars caused by nuclear power production, mining, and iron and steel industry in Malmberget, Kiruna, Barsebäck and Avesta in Sweden; Ignalina and Visaginas/Sniečkus in Lithuania/former Soviet Union; and Duisburg in the Ruhr district of Germany. The scars are shaped by time and geographical scale; they carry the vestiges of life and work, of community spirit and hope, of betrayed dreams and repressive hierarchical structures. What is critical, Storm concludes, is the search for a legitimate politics of memory. The meanings of the scars must be acknowledged. Past and present experiences must be shared in order shape new understandings of old places.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Storm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2014, 7 (2-3): 9-11.

The diaspora of Armenians in Eastern Europe dates back to the Middle Ages. The text describes the medieval settlements. Then it reviews a new book by the Romanian-Armenian writer Varujan Vosganian, Book of Whispers.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Europe-Asia Studies 2014, 66 (10): 1737-1738.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina Tarasova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Facing an Unequal World. : International Sociological Association.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina Tarasova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: On conference website. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina Tarasova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2014, online (June 27): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina TarasovaKarin Edberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political ScienceSociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Warsaw : Norden Centrum, 2014. (Analizy Norden Centrum ; 5 (25))

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina Tarasova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2014, VII (4): 60-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Interface 2014, 6 (2): 328-356.

Squatting has been present in Central and Eastern Europe since the fall of state socialism and Poland is pointed out as exceptional in the development of squatting in the area. However, looking closer at the squatting environment in Warsaw reveals that the movements’ successes are a result of a cross-movement alliance with the tenants’ movement. The cooperation between squatters and tenants have in a short period of time gained a strong negotiating position vis-à-vis local authorities in Warsaw. The objective of this article is to analyse the mechanisms behind the cooperation of squatters’ and the tenants’ movements and in particular the cognitive processes behind the formation of an alliance. Specific research questions posed in the article cover how the cooperation between the squatting movement and the tenants’ movement emerge in the city, and what cognitive processes characterize the cooperation. The empirical material for the study consists of altogether 40 semi-structured interviews with squatters and activists in the tenants’ movement in the city. It is argued in the article that the development of alliance formation includes processes of defining common goals, underplaying of differences, and recognizing common strength. Moreover, in order to reach the point when the alliance is formed the process of recognition of common strength needs to be successful in both movements resulting in a shared perception of empowerment.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Sankt-Peterburg : Norma, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Dmitrii Nechiporuk


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geografiska Notiser 2014, LXXII (4): 193-194.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Borderlands Studies 2014, : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Paradox of Openness. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2014. 1-9.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl MarklundNorbert Götz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical StudiesPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2014.

The ‘open society’ has become a watchword of liberal democracy and the market system in the modern globalized world. Openness stands for individual opportunity and collective reason, as well as bottom-up empowerment and top-down transparency. It has become a cherished value, despite its vagueness and the connotation of vulnerability that surrounds it. Scandinavia has long considered itself a model of openness, citing traditions of freedom of information and inclusive policy making. This collection of essays traces the conceptual origins, development, and diverse challenges of openness in the Nordic countries and Austria. It examines some of the many paradoxes that openness encounters and the tensions it arouses when it addresses such divergent ends as democratic deliberation and market transactions, freedom of speech and sensitive information, compliant decision making and political and administrative transparency, and consensual procedures and the toleration of dissent.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl MarklundNorbert Götz

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical StudiesPolitics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Eco-ethica 2014, 3 : 39-51.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Eurasia 2.0. : .

Eurasian Union and Russian World have recently been the most important, although hardly compatible concepts of Russian geopolitics. Though they became entirely common terms of reference in contemporary political discourses, bear no officially defined ideological meaning. There is clear contradiction that Russia enters into the Eurasian Economic Union (as of the 1 January 2015) on equal basis with other countries and at the same time propagates the ideas of the Russian World, which supports dominance of Russian language and Russian nationalism as an unquestionable priority.Nevertheless, there exists popular discourse in the Russian blogosphere, which attempts to combine 'Eurasian Union' and 'Russian World' into persuasive ideological narrative. In this paper I try to analyse the main arguments of this public debate, its chief commentators and the instruments of creating public discourse surrounding these notions. Significantly enough, the sites that provide platform for this discussion in the Internet have an image of serious international academic institutions or governmentally sponsored think tanks (which they are not). Clearly, bloggers who initiate this discussion on such sites (existing not only in Russia, but over whole post-Soviet space) aspire of some leverage in political decision making, they imitate closeness to Kremlin, which makes their statements seemingly weightier. Central authorities, instead, try to distance themselves from these discussions and bloggers. They do not acknowledge their existence on the official web-sites and do not enter into discussions, probably fearing the Web 2.0 discussions as charged with dissident potential per se. I am hypothesizing that bloggers try to find the common denomination for the notions of Eurasian Union and Russian World and governmental official try to intentionally distance themselves from clearly formulated ideological statements, because any clarification means constrain and necessity to follow certain path. Now Kremlin has all irons in the fire and refuses to arrest the meaning of key political concepts

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2014, VII (2-3): 48-55.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Stockholm : Hjalmarson & Högberg, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Bert Edström

Ragnar BjörkThomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Tillsammans. Stockholm : Bokförlaget Atlas, 2014. 85-103.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Maidan Uprising, Separatism and Foreign Intervention. : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014. 183-205.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Igor Torbakov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

The history of the ethnic borderlands of Hungary and Romania in the years 1867–1944 were marked by changing national borders, ethnic conflicts and economic problems. Using a local case study of the city and county of Szatmár/Satu-Mare, this thesis investigates the practice and social mechanisms of economic nationalizing. It explores the interplay between ethno-national and economic factors, and furthermore analyses what social mechanisms lead to and explain inclusion, exclusion and annihilation.The underlying principle of economic nationalizing in both countries was the separation of citizens into ethnic categories and the establishment of a dominant core nation entitled to political and economic privileges from the state. National leaders implemented a policy of economic nationalizing that exploited and redistributed resources taken from the minorities. To pursue this end, leaders instrumentalized ethnicity, which institutionalized inequality and ethnic exclusion. This process of ethnic, and finally racial, exclusion marked the whole period and reached its culmination in the annihilation of the Jews throughout most of Hungary in 1944.For nearly a century, ethnic exclusion undermined the various nationalizing projects in the two countries: the Magyarization of the minorities in dualist Hungary (1867–1918); the Romanianization of the economy of the ethnic borderland in interwar Romania (1918–1940); and finally the re-Hungarianization of the economy in Second World War Hungary (1940–1944).The extreme case of exclusion, namely the Holocaust, revealed that the path of exclusion brought nothing but destruction for everyone. This reinforces the thesis that economic nationalizing through the exclusion of minorities induces a vicious circle of ethnic bifurcation, political instability and unfavorable conditions for achieving economic prosperity. Exclusion served the short-term elite’s interest but undermined the long-term nation’s ability to prosper. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anu Mai Köll

Anders Blomqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2014, VII (2-3): 90-91.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Dagens Nyheter 2014, 27 oktober : 6-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Rudolf Kjellén. Stockholm : Hjalmarson & Högberg, 2014. 82-99.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Europe-Asia Studies 2014, 66 (8): 1374-1375.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Stockholm : Folkbildningsrådet, 2014. (Folkbildningsrådet utvärderar ; 2014: 3)

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Eva Andersson

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Women in Politics and Media. New York : Bloomsbury Academic, 2014. 115-130.

This chapter focuses on the attitudes of Russian journalists toward media representations of women politicians. It seeks to answer the following questions: How does the culture of political journalism influence gendering of women politicians? And what makes the Russian culture of political journalism unique when it comes to the coverage women politicians get? The chapter addresses the journalists’ interpretations of the low number of women politicians in media content, and turns to the journalists’ reasoning behind gender spotlighting and stereotyping. Highlighting the contradictions between the ideas, practices, and ideals present in the culture of the ‘quality’ political journalism in Russia, the chapter discusses how journalists envision the future of media representations of women politicians and how this relates to the problem of gender inequality in the political realm.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Rudolf Kjellén. Stockholm : Hjalmarson & Högberg, 2014. 262-284.

Rudolf Kjellén ses idag vanligen som den hårdföra geopolitikens upphovsman. Men ett närmare studium av hans analys av förhållandet mellan natur och kultur och mellan materiella och immateriella maktresurser visar att han också ansåg att en aktiv ”biopolitik” kunde påverka geopolitikens lagar till små och medelstora staters fördel. När det kom till frågan om Sveriges ställning i världen upprätthöll Kjellén t.ex. inte den åtskillnad mellan ”mjuka” kulturella resurser och ”hårda” naturlagar som vanligen anses som typisk för geopolitiken. Snarare pendlade han mellan vad vi idag skulle se som konstruktivistiska respektive realistiska impulser i studiet av internationella relationer.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Farnham : Ashgate, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: The Paradox of Openness. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2014. 237-261.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Paradox of Openness. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2014. 143-172.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

The news media are expected to provide equal space to female and male political actors, promoting the idea of equal access to political power, since they are recognized as a holder of power with a social responsibility to respect gender equality. However, as previous research shows, political news coverage is characterized by so-called “gendered mediation” (Gidengil and Everitt 1999), i.e., gender imbalance, stereotypes, and a lack of discussions about gender inequality. Scholars point to media logic, organization, and individual characteristics of journalists as the main reasons for this pattern, but still very little is known about how and why gendered mediation is practiced and processed in political news.This dissertation focuses on gendering understood as the perceived imprint of gender on the media portrayal of politics and politicians, as well as the processes by which gendered representations materialize. By applying a perspective of comparative journalism culture studies (Hanitzsch 2007; Hanitzsch and Donsbach 2012), it examines the processes and modes of origin of gendering as they are perceived and experienced by journalists. The study is based on semi-structured interviews with 40 journalists working for the quality press in Russia and Sweden.The results show that the national culture of political journalism, and the context it is located within, are of crucial importance for understanding gendering and its modes of origin. Gendering may cause problems to the democratic development of society and the position of the quality press in it; however, it also offers a potential for promoting gender equality. The choice of the form of gendering does not fully depend on journalists. It depends on the contextual possibilities for journalists to fulfill the gender-ethical ideal of the quality outlet as long as they need to meet the demands of society and market, and to face the challenges of political communication.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Thomas Hanitzsch

Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2014, VII (1): 58-71.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Nordström

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research 2014, 6 : 327-359.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Madeleine HurdSteffen Werther

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Post-Soviet nostalgia, generally understood as a sentimental longing forthe Soviet past, has penetrated deep into many branches of Russian popular culture in the post-1989 period. The present study investigates how the Soviet past has been mediated in the period between 1991 and 2012 as one element of a prominent structure of feeling in present-day Russian culture.The Soviet past is represented through different mediating arenas – cultural domains and communicative platforms in which meanings are created and circulated. The mediating arenas examined in this study include television, the Internet, fashion, restaurants, museums and theatre. The study of these arenas has identified common ingredients which are elements of a structure of feeling of the period in question. At the same time, the research shows that the representations of the past vary with the nature of the medium and the genre.The analysis of mediations of the Soviet past in Russian contemporary culture reveals that there has been a change in the representations of the Soviet past during the past twenty years, which roughly correspond to the two decades marked by the presidencies of Boris Yeltsin in the 1990s and of Vladimir Putin in the 2000s (including Dmitrii Medvedev's term, 2008–2012). The critical and reflective component that was present in representations of the Soviet past in the 1990s has slowly faded away, making room first for more commercial and then for political exploitations of the past. Building on Svetlana Boym's conceptual framework of reflective and restorative nostalgia, the present study provides an illustration of how reflective nostalgia is being gradually supplanted by restorative nostalgia.Academic research has provided many definitions of nostalgia, from strictly medical explanations to more psychological and socio-cultural perspectives. The present study offers examples of how nostalgia functions as a label in ascribing political and cultural identities to oneself and to others, creating confusion about the term and about what and who can rightly be called nostalgic.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Fornäs

Ekaterina Kalinina

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

This dissertation deals with how science fiction reflects the shift in cultural paradigms that occurred in the Soviet Union between the 1960s and the 1970s. Interest was displaced from the rational to the irrational, from a scientific-technologically oriented optimism about the future to art, religion, philosophy and metaphysics. Concomitant with this shift in interests was a shift from the future to an elsewhere or, reformulated in exclusively spatial terms, from utopia to heterotopia.The dissertation consists of an analysis of three novels by the Strugatsky brothers (Arkady, 1925-1991 and Boris 1933-2012): Inspector Glebsky’s Puzzle (Otel’ U pogibšego al’pinista, 1970), The Kid (Malyš, 1971) and Roadside Picnic (Piknik na obočine, 1972) and two films Dead Mountaineer’s Hotel (Hukkunud alpinisti hotell/ Otel’ U pogibšego al’pinista, Kromanov, 1979) and Stalker (Tarkovsky, 1980).  The three novels, allegedly treatments of the theme of contact with an extraterrestrial intelligence, were intended to be published in one volume with the title Unexpected Encounters. The films are based on two of the novels.In the novels an earlier Marxist utopia has given way to a considerably more ambiguous heterotopia, largely envisioned as versions of the West. An indication of how the authors here seem to look back towards history rather than forward towards the future is to be found in the persistent strain of literary Gothic that runs through the novels. This particular trait resurfaces in the films as well. The films reflect how tendencies only discernable in the novels have developed throughout the decade, such as the budding Soviet consumer culture and the religious sensibilities of the artistic community.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Yvonne Howell

Anna Ljunggren

Henriette Cederlöf


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Gender in Focus: (New) Trends in Media. Braga : University of Minho.

Since the 1960-s, when gender media studies originated, a special attention of gender media scholars has been paid to the different aspects of political communication. “Gendered mediation” (Gidengil and Everitt 1999), or “gendering”, of politicians and politics is considered to have a crucial influence both on the voter recognition of female and male candidates, and political participation of women and men. Scholars have provided potential reasons, which can explain the way women and men politicians, as well as the problem of the gender imbalance in political sphere are covered in political journalism (e.g. Braden 1996, Ross 2002, Falk 2008). Despite the media institution (its logic, organization, and individual characteristics of the media producers) being defined as the key “guilty party” of the patterns revealed by the scholars, journalists have remained silent producers of the assumed “gendered mediation”.This paper turns to the political journalists’ vision of the (gendered) media portrayal of politicians and politics. Its aim is to explore the reasons of gendering in quality press, as they are conceptualized by political journalists. The study focuses on journalists working in two different cultural and political contexts – in Russia and in Sweden. The choice of the cases is driven by the wish to define the similar and different elements in the journalists’ conceptions of the reasons of gendering in different political and cultural contexts, where the two cases work as an illustration of the global tendency of mediatization of politics.Based on the analytical framework suggested by Hanitzsch (2007), the paper turns to the journalists’ conceptions of gendering in relation to their concern of the professional norms and ethical standards, institutional roles, and epistemological beliefs. The concluding discussion links gendering as a component of the national culture of political journalism and the global tendency of mediatization of politics.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Гендер и СМИ [Gender and Media]. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism Lomonosov Moscow State University, 2014. 117-129.

This article focuses on gendered media representations as an instrument of getting economicbenefits and a tool of interaction with readers. Based on interviews with Russian and Swedish quality press’ employees, this study shows that gendered media representations are one of the resources of the quality press’ competitiveness on the media-market. However, the choice of the gendered representations, which attract both the audiences and advertisers, is strictly context-dependent.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In the seventeenth- and early eighteenth centuries, fluits were the most common type of merchant ship used in Baltic trade. Originally a Dutch design, the majority of all goods transported between Sweden and the Republic was carried on board such vessels. Far from all voyages reached their destination. Down in the cold brackish water of the Baltic, the preservation conditions are optimal, and several of these unfortunate vessels remain nearly intact today. Although thousands of more or less identical fluits were built, surprisingly little is known about the arrangement of space on board, their sculptural embellishment and other aspects that formed the physical component of everyday life on and alongside these ships. Fluits were a fixture in early modern society, so numerous that they became almost invisible. The study of wrecks thus holds great potential for revealing vital components of early modern life. Inspired by phenomenological approaches in archaeology, this thesis aims to focus on the lived experience of fluits. It sets out to grasp for seemingly mundane everyday activities relating to these ships, from the physical arrangements for eating, sleeping and answering nature’s call, to their rearrangement for naval use, and ends with a consideration of the architectonical contribution of the fluit to the urban landscape.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johan Rönnby

Niklas Eriksson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Archaeology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Internasjonal Politikk 2014, 72 (2): 282-284.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Critique of Cosmopolitan Reason. Oxford : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014. 3-34.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov

Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Oxford : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014.

Since the Enlightenment, the definition of terms such as humanity, citizenship and rights has fluctuated and these ideas continue to haverelevance for contemporary discussions of globalization from a «cosmopolitan» perspective. This volume goes back to the conception ofcosmopolitanism in Greek antiquity in order to trace it through history, resulting in an unmasking of its many myths. The concept is reconstructedwith reference not only to well-known (and some lesser known) historical thinkers of cosmopolitanism, but also to noted «anti-cosmopolitans».The first aim of the book is to display historical perspectives on a discourse which has been dominated by ahistorical presumptions. Thesecond is to critically explore alternative paths beyond the Western imagination, redefining the Enlightenment legacy and the centre-peripherydichotomy. Most notably, Eastern Europe and the Arab world are integrated within the analysis of cosmopolitanism. Within a framework ofconceptual history (Begriffsgeschichte), cosmopolitan reason is criticized from the viewpoints of comparative literature, psychoanalysis,phenomenology, postcolonialism and moral philosophy.The book’s critical approach is an attempt to come to terms with the anachronism, essentialism, ethnocentrism and anthropocentrism thatsometimes underlie contemporary theoretical and methodological uses of the term «cosmopolitanism». By adding historical and contextualdepth to the problem of cosmopolitanism, a reflexive corrective is presented to enhance ongoing discussions of this topic within as well asoutside academia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov

Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Milan, Italy : Mimesis Edizioni, 2014.

At the end of the Second World War, Stalin forged the communist regimes in Eastern Europe as satellites of Soviet Union. After ten hard years of Soviet Stalinism, with the changings introduced by the 20th Congress of the CPSU, the leaderships of satellites' communist parties risked to be overthrown by their internal rivals. In Romania, in 1956, Party Secretary Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej converted Romania into a Stalinist system guided by Romanians: the Romanian receipe in order to prevent the change included the recovery of the national elite and intellectuals previously ostracized. While presenting itself as communist, the regime increasingly used nationalism for the creation of domestic consensus in anti-Soviet function. Nicolae Ceausescu, came to power in 1965, continued this strategy and led it to its climax, expanding dramatically the propaganda machine, that flooded into the everyday life of the Romanians. In particular, it was the discourse on national history that was manipulated and falsified for mere political needs, and declined in each type of cultural product, both in the academic literature as well as in popular literature and the arts. This book narrates how Romanian culture was subservient to the maintenance of a political system for over forty years and the consequences of this forced regimentation after the demolition of the Berlin Wall.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Svenska Dagbladet 2014, 28 juni : 32-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Lönn

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Border Conflicts in the Contemporary World. Lublin : Maria Curie-Sklodowska University Press, 2014. 193-213.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Cross-Border Cooperation Structures In Europe . Brussel : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014. 181-192.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

This dissertation concerns live action role-playing (larp). Larp may be described as improvised theater without an audience, as participants simultaneously embody both audience and actor in their constant interaction with one another.  Hence, larp can be seen as a participatory culture.  The study is based on participant observation, interviews and online ethnography in Denmark, Latvia, Sweden and Norway.The aim of the thesis is to analyze how bodies materialize, take and are given space in larps. At the heart of the study lie questions on how processes of embodiment are enacted before, during and after the game.Two central concepts - larp chronotope and matrix of interpretation – shape the analysis. The first denotes the specific timespace in which a larp takes place, e.g a Soviet military camp or a fantasy world. The second concept stands for a general matrix of norms that informs participants on how to enact their characters in the larp chronotope.The thesis shows that participants strive to act in ways that are intelligible according to the matrix of interpretation that reigns during the game days. In addition, although game and everyday matrixes of interpretations are always inseparable, while attending a larp the participant’s ordinary lives are temporarily allowed to fade into the background. Thus, larps are complex combinations of objects, spaces and bodies that are given new relations and new meanings.Furthermore, the thesis shows that larp embodiment is conditioned by normative ideas of what it means to be an intelligible live action role player. White male bodies are more likely to access the sphere of larp intelligibility than others, which is evident in many of the stories and made up worlds portrayed in the study. Yet, the collaborative narration of game worlds that take place before larps can include all sorts of bodies. Consequently, larps provide an opportunity for alternative forms of embodiment and experiences.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Beatriz Lindqvist

Erika Lundell


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Att växa som människa. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2014. 231-250.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

This is a study of how mothers of young children relate to risk in everyday life, with an emphasis on the in­visible risks associated with modernity in general, and with food in particular. It explores variations and similarities in how mothers deal with risk in two cultural contexts: Sweden and Poland. The study is based on twenty qualitative interviews with university educated mothers of small children in Stockholm and Warsaw. While risks more generally challenge how we “get on” with our lives, mothers of young children in particular have a special relationship to risk. During pregnancy and breastfeeding they are subject to all kinds of risk minimization efforts, and mothers are ultimately held "infinitely responsible" for their children's welfare by society. Women's transition to parenthood then makes for a particularly in­teresting case as to how risks manifest in everyday life. The theoretical framework draws on modernization theory, combined with insights from cultural theory. In addition, various contributions from sociological and psychological risk research, family sociology and research on parenting and motherhood are used to highlight contextual aspects and to inter­pret the empirical results. Two aspects of the mothers’ relationship to risk and food are examined in this study: firstly, their risk constructs, i.e. what they perceive as ‘risky’ with regards to food; and, secondly, their risk management strategies, i.e. how they deal with identified risks on a practical and cognitive level. The overall risk management depicted in this study is characterized by reflexivity, critical thinking, infor­mation retrieval, attention to scientific evidence, purposely transferred trust, confidence and the ability to make fairly sophisticated tradeoffs between risks and other aspects of life. Neither the Swedish nor the Polish mothers then conform to popular notions of ‘security junkies’ or ‘paranoid parenting’. Nonetheless, the comparative approach demonstrates how contextual differences, such as general trust levels and family policy, influence both the risk constructs and the employment of different risk management strategies.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kerstin Jacobsson

Erik Löfmarck


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The New European Frontiers. Newcastle on Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014. 64-88.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Borderlands are often peripheral geographically, administratively, and economically. A particularly illustrative case is the Szczecin area at the border between Poland and Germany, where a large city on one side neighbours to a sparsely populated hinterland on the other. There is a number of similar cases throughout Europe, but studies on them point to a mixed level of linkages following the opening and removal of the physical border.At the project’s start there were few if any studies on the Szczecin area per se, which was here studied through various methods. On the one hand, different pre-EU enlargement plans and visions for the area’s development were compared with practices and realities of recent years. This shows that earlier imaginations on the development potentials have not quite materialised, although some of them were probably too optimistic and ambitious from the beginning. Some of the area’s potentials following EU-enlargement have been more successfully exploited than others, and disproportionately by actors coming from outside. On the other hand, cross-border contacts were studied in the discourses on and attitudes towards the other side among local and regional elites, and among local residents more generally. This revealed a polarised attitudinal landscape, not least when compared to country-wide opinion surveys in both Germany and Poland. This is in line with other studies showing that identities are particularly accentuated in border situations, where the Other is more frequently encountered.These results support recent investigations pointing to a continued relevance of the border even after the physical barriers are removed. At the same time, another contribution of this work to border studies is that the time and contingency of the importance of identities and of the border needs more attention. In the Szczecin area, awareness of national identities and of the boundary appeared to be particularly high just after changes in the border’s status occurred – i.e. in 1989–1991, and then around the years 2007–2010. But while its importance may be fluctuating over time, given the opportunities and resources the boundary provides it will always be maintained in some forms.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gunnel Forsberg

Péter Balogh


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

This study explores how language is thematized in a selection of literary texts written in Swedish and German by Peter Weiss between 1946 and 1960. The textual interpretations seek to establish how Weiss’s literary work forms a multifaceted reflection on language and its cultural, historical and material preconditions. The various literary conceptualizations of language in Weiss’s texts are shown to be intimately linked to historical processes, where early postwar Germany plays a crucial role as a contextual framework. The study demonstrates how the texts explore an acoustic dimension of language, where non-articulatory sounds and noises oscillate between two poles: they either pose a threat to the narrator, or form a promise of a future emancipatory linguistic expression beyond a territorializing and violent language. Furthermore, the study argues that the sounds and noises permeating Weiss’s literary work form a soundtrack of past violence haunting the present. Finally, this soundtrack is shown to undermine a German postwar literary discourse that postulates a historical break after the Second World War (Stunde Null) as well as a new German literary language cleansed of Nazi contamination (Kahlschlag).The study draws its theoretical framework mainly from research concerned with mono- and multilingualism in literature, as well as from intermedial studies examining the interaction between literary texts and other artistic media such as the visual arts and music.The material examined in the study consists of six short stories in Swedish published between 1946 and 1953 in the literary journals 40-tal, Prisma and All världens berättare; the prose manuscript “Der Vogelfreie” (1947), later published as Der Fremde. Erzählung (1980); as well as the “micro novel” Der Schatten des Körpers des Kutschers (1960). Aside from these literary texts, Weiss’s documentary film Enligt lag (1957) and his feature film Hägringen (1959) are also analyzed.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anders Olsson

Markus Huss

Ola Holmgren


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

-

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Lost Swedish Tribe. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2014. 61-85.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia Malitska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: The Lost Swedish Tribe. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2014. 13-35.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia MalitskaPiotr Wawrzeniuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Stockholm : Axl Books, 2014.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders BurmanRebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Tysk idealism. Stockholm : Axl Books, 2014. 7-38.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders BurmanRebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2014.

In the spring of 1782 a group of peasants of Swedish origin reached their destination on the right bank of Dnipro River in Ukraine. The village they founded became known as “Gammalsvenskby” (Russian “Staroshvedskoe,” English “Old Swedish Village”). In the 1880s links were established with Sweden and Swedophone Finland where the villagers were seen through a nationalistic-romantic prism and in broad circles became known as a brave group of people who had preserved their Swedish culture in hostile surroundings; in the terminology of this volume, a “lost Swedish tribe”. The village remained largely intact until 1929, when in the aftermath of the Russian revolution a majority of the villagers decided to leave for Sweden. When they arrived, there was disappointment. Neither Sweden nor the lost tribe lived up to expectations. Some of the villagers returned to Ukraine and the USSR.This book offers an alternative perspective on Gammalsvenskby. The changing fortunes of the villagers are largely seen in the light of two grand top-down modernization projects – Russia’s imperial, originating in the latter half of the eighteenth century, and the Soviet, carried out in the early 1920s – but also of the modernization projects in Sweden and Finland. The story the book has to tell of Gammalsvenskby is a new one, and moreover, it is a story of relevance also for the history of Russia, Ukraine, Sweden and Finland.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Julia MalitskaPiotr Wawrzeniuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSamtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

GeoJournal 2014, 79 (4): 401-405.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sasha Tsenkova

Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

GeoJournal 2014, 79 (4): 407-419.

The aim of this article is to investigate regulations regarding housing and spatial planning to determine the extent to which these have influenced the development of gated housing in Poland since 1989. The focus is on how government policy with regard to spatial planning and housing, together with the law on property and ownership, influences the emergence and development of gated forms of housing in the country. Legal regulation documents concerning issues of housing and spatial planning between 1990 and 2013 have been studied. The article argues that the liberal policies and legal regulation in the country is resulting in a disregard for spatial planning and housing, but also the lack of integrated urban policies. Existing spatial plans are of a consultative nature and bear no regulatory capacity, at the same time as housing programmes and spatial planning in the country is strongly in favor of private investors and new construction. All these shortcomings have created a differentiated housing market, one in which housing developers maximize their profits by constructing gated housing complexes, combined with a tendency among those who have the means to move to newly built housing behind gates. The long period of developer-friendly policies and governmental support of purchasers of new construction, have resulted in increased popularity of gated communities in Poland and their spread to many Polish cities.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

This research thesis analyzes the characteristics of communication work in a call centre, by examining the communication work at a Swedish call centre which is outsourced to Latvia. The thesis studies the ways in which communication with the customers is organized, carried out and assigned meaning. Theoretically, the thesis draws on both critical and management-oriented perspectives of work. The empirical investigation combines participant observations at the call centre with individual interviews, mainly conducted with operators and management staff.The communication work is analyzed both as labour and as communicative activity. The concept of labour focuses upon the relation between employer and employee. Therefore, the analysis is placed within the framework of a capitalistic production system, through a survey of the economic and the organisational working conditions. The communicative activity deals with how the telephone conversations with the customers are enacted. In that part of the analyses, the working routines and the meaning making practices are illuminated.As examined in the current research, the communication work is indeed constructed in an alienated manner, through high levels of standardization, immobility, and estrangement from both customers and the customers’ culture. Nonetheless, merely being employed has meant significant economic security for the operators of the Latvian call centre. The operators are incumbents of a society affected by deep economic crises with high unemployment rates. In relation to their broader society, the employees have found meaning within their immediate social situation. This may explain why they endure the monotonous work with few opportunities for development.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Stefan Jonsson

Carina GuyardGöran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Baltic Studies 2014, 45 (3): 321-344.

This article addresses political-party organization in Estonia, especially candidate selection. Its first objective is to describe the ways in which the main parties chose their candidates before the 2011 parliamentary election. A second objective is to evaluate those procedures in light of expectations generated by established theory. The focus is on two conditions: the institutional framework, particularly the electoral system, and the relative youth of Estonian democracy. The evidence confirms these expectations only partially, which suggests that an individual party’s ideological, organizational and strategic circumstances, in addition to structural and institutional conditions, are critical to understanding why it performs this basic function as it does.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nicholas Aylott

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

European Political Science Review 2014, 6 (2): 261-281.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Erik Amnå

Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

East European Politics and Societies 2014, 28 (2): 341-365.

Much of the political science literature suggests that a cohesive political community is advantageous, if not a precondition, for a stable democracy. Forging a cohesive community is obviously a more complex matter in a multi-ethnic setting. This article will consider the prospects of building political communities in the Baltic countries – three countries that, to various extents, struggle to balance ethnic pluralism, nation-building and democracy. The article examines the relationship between political community and democracy from a theoretical perspective, followed by an outline of the nation-building strategies taken by Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania after re-establishing independence in the early 90s. Drawing on survey data, we will use territorial attachment to tap the sense of political community in the three countries. Notably, our figures disclose that most of the Russian-speaking minorities in Estonia and Latvia identify themselves as 'Russians', and not at all with the country they reside in. This suggests that the contested issue of citizenship rights in the two countries has not been particularly conducive for creating cohesive political communities. We then move to the political regime and set out to examine the character of regime support in the three countries. Can we envisage solid support for democracy and its institutions in the absence of a cohesive political community? As it appears, regime support is not contingent on territorial identity. Our data disclose that many Baltic inhabitants draw a clear distinction between their own experiences with different political systems and what they perceive as relevant regime options today.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sten Berglund

Kjetil Duvold


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Since the 1970s, the concept of “economic informality” has served as focal point for a comprehensive scholarly thinking and the development of policy initiatives enhanced by international organisations. Yet, informality displays a puzzling resilience. The problematique of this book concerns the lenses through which informality has been constituted, studied and acted upon as an empirical phenomenon. By developing a critical understanding of informality as object of study, the book uncovers the historical, scholarly and practitioner contexts in which contemporary conceptualisations of informality are constituted.The author argues that three dominant and conventional approaches to informality systematically fail to account for how the reasons behind people's participation in informal economic activities are constituted by an internal and hierarchically structured social order. To transcend the identified shortcomings of the established approaches, the book rethinks informality through a comprehensive power analysis and highlights the importance of hierarchy, covert violence and domination. A central assumption of this rethinking is that informality constitutes a social phenomenon that emerges and is expressed through social practices, which over time and across space have become institutionalised to the point that informality is considered commonsensical and unchangeable. By putting the reconceptualisation to use through the thinking of Pierre Bourdieu, the book performs an empirical analysis of the nexus between resilience, symbolic violence and informal economic practices in Kosovo from the late 1980s until 2011. Based on primary research material, the analysis offers a unique insight into informal dynamics and illuminates the workings of an intrinsic, circular, malleable and ambiguous system of domination that would otherwise remain hidden.By engaging the empirical, theoretical and meta-theoretical level at the same time, the book explores the twofold constitution of informality as a social phenomenon and brings to light a new understanding of the resilience of the informal. As such, the reconceptualisation forms a critical intervention into scholarly and practitioner discussions about informality. By revealing mechanisms of domination, the book offers an alternative and fruitful account of the socio-historical weave within which practices of informality in Kosovo crystallise. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Joakim Ekman

Anna Danielsson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

European Societies 2014, 16 (2): 320-321.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

In: On conference website. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina Tarasova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

Nowadays Eurasianism is gradually transformed from a philosophical doctrine known only to experts into cultural and political practice. The attempts of reintegration of the former Soviet Union made by Kremlin encourage population to reflect on the historical mission of Russia and its ‘civilizational’ identity. Vladimir Putin in his article published in “Izvestya” in October 2011 made clear division between the supporters and opponents of the Eurasian Union. Russia’s contemporary Minister of Culture, Vladimir Medinsky, warmly supports the idea of the Eurasian integration and even called it the major “macro-task” of Russia. In his writings and documents of his ministry, Medinsky actively entertains the idea of Eurasian union and considers Eurasianism one of the most fruitful doctrines aiming at Russian inner and foreign politics.  In my presentation I am going to analyze the recent documents and statements of the Ministry of Culture concerning Eurasianism as a force of cultural and political re-integration of Russia with former Soviet territories and other neighboring countries.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2013, VI (3-4): 2-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Irina Kotkina


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michal Bron Jr


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

[password protected access]

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michal Bron Jr


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Kultura i Edukacja 2013, 99 (6): 170-190.

Looming crisis, public discontent with privatization, and widening inequalities are factors which have historically set the electorate in favour of social democratic welfare policies. Today,however, these concerns rather appear to support new right-wing populist countermovements, even in the traditionally progressive Nordic countries. This article asks why thereis not more explicit support of progressive policies, despite the presence of socio-economicfactors which would normally favour such a policy shift, at least not just yet. In response to this query, the article first analyses the comparisons between the present crisis and the crisisof the 1930s with regard to alleged political inertia. It then reinterprets the contemporarypolitical consequences of crisis by revisiting three classical social theorists who took pains atanalysing the political responses to the economic crisis of the 1930s: Karl Popper, Gunnar Myrdal, and Karl Polanyi. On the basis of this revisitation of these three classics, the articleargues that the combined eff ects of distrust in politics and the persistence of admittedly rolled-back welfare systems mutes the progressive reform potential of the present crisis.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ab Imperio 2013, 4 : 249-253.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2013, online (April 21): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Nordström

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ideas in History 2013, 7 (1-2): 5-13.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katarina Leppänen

Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Sjuttonhundratal 2013, : 188-192.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Communicating the North. Farnham : Ashgate, 2013. 1-24.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Peter Stadius

Jonas Harvard


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Communicating the North. Farnham : Ashgate, 2013. 319-332.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Peter Stadius

Jonas Harvard


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Communicating the North. Farnham : Ashgate, 2013. 47-73.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Jonas Harvard


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Communicating the North. Farnham : Ashgate, 2013. 75-98.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Magdalena Hillström

Jonas Harvard


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Farnham : Ashgate, 2013.

What makes a magazine in South Africa promote Scandinavian unity among its immigrant readers and why does a Swedish king endorse attempts to influence pan-Scandinavian opinion through a transnational media event in Sweden, Norway and Denmark? Can portraits of exotic Lapplanders in the British press, enthusiastic accounts of the welfare state in post-war travel literature and descriptions of the liberal Nordic woman as a metaphor for a freer society in Franco Spain really be bundled together under a joint label of 'Nordicness'? How is it that despite the variety of images of the Nordic region that are circulating, we still find this recurring idea of a shared Nordic identity? These are some of the questions the current volume seeks to answer. Covering the time period from the early nineteenth century up until the present and encompassing case studies from Britain, Spain, Poland, and South Africa, as well as from the Nordic countries, contributors to the volume investigate the images that have been presented of the Nordic region in the media in and outside of the Nordic countries, how such images have been shaped by mechanisms of mediation, and the channels through which they have been distributed. The chapters address both specific cases such as media events and individual publications, as well as the structural and institutional settings for mediating the Nordic region. © Jonas Harvard, Peter Stadius and the contributors 2013. All rights reserved.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Peter Stadius

Jonas Harvard


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nordisk Tidskrift för vetenskap, konst och industri 2013, 89 (4): 349-358.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Kleberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Tal, makt, vansinne. Höör : Symposion Brutus Östlings bokförlag, 2013. 45-55.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Kleberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Cold War Studies 2013, 15 (3): 216-217.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Helene Carlbäck

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Beyond NGO-ization. Farnham : Ashgate, 2013. 169-189.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nikolay Zakharov

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2013, VI (3-4): 33-34.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Axess 2013, 5 : 9-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Expressen 2013, 20 november : 4-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Bokbyggare. Stockholm : Carlsson Bokförlag, 2013. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Svenskt + tyskt. Stockholm : Instant Book, 2013. 224-240.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Talekonst och passion. Hällevadsholm : Thomas Thorild sällskapet, 2013. 67-80.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Między językami, kulturami, literaturami/. Stockholm : Slaviska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, 2013. -.

The article discusses the work of the émigré writer Michał Moszkowicz. After a brief presentation of his biografy  and an analysis of his key novels, the author of the article concludes that - contrary to popular opinion expressed by reviewers - the most important issu in this prose is not multiculturalism, not the transcending of language barriers, or the attempt to understand Otherness (with the writer's biografy suggests). Moszkowicz's novels are, however, - as evidenced by the article - very Polish, arch-Polisch. This is not only because Moszkowicz writes in Polish and refers to the tradition of Polish literature but also because he fights with Polishness. Polishness which irritates him, which sometimes hurts, but which is always very important to him. The most important issue in Moszkowicz's novels is not the matter of the social, cultural, or national affiliation of his hero but an analysis of the transformation of his individual identity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Janusz Korek


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geografiska Notiser 2013, LXXI (1): 44-47.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geografiska Notiser 2013, LXXI (2): 90-94.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geografiska Notiser 2013, 71 (3): 124-130.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Biographisches Lexikon für Pommern. Köln : Böhlau, 2013. 212-214.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marco Nase

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2013, VI (3-4): 61-63.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Political State of the Region Report 2013. Copenhagen : Baltic Development Forum, 2013. 50-53.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nordidactica 2013, 3 (1): 1-11.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Settlements and Spatial Planning 2013, 4 (1): 101-108.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Péter Balogh


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Handbook of Political Change in Eastern Europe. Aldershot : Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013. 125-166.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mindaugas Jurkynas

Kjetil Duvold


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2013, 6 (3-4): 21-28.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johnny Rodin

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

The Iron Curtain was seen as the divider between East and West in Cold War Europe. The term is closely connected to the Cold War and expressions such as ‘behind the Iron Curtain’ or ‘after the fall of the Iron Curtain’ are common within historical discussions in the second half of the twentieth century. Even if the term was used regularly as a metaphor there was also a material side with a series of highly militarised borders running throughout Europe. The metaphor and the material borders developed together and individually, sometimes intertwined and sometimes separate.In my research I have carried out two fieldwork studies at sites that can be considered part of the former Iron Curtain. The first study area is located between Italy and Slovenia (formerly Yugoslavia) in which the division between the two towns of Nova Gorica on the Slovenian side and Gorizia on the Italian side was investigated. The second study area is located on the border between Austria and Czech Republic (formerly Czechoslovakia) within two national parks. A smaller study was also carried out in Berlin as the Berlin Wall is considered of major importance in the context of the Iron Curtain. This research has resulted in large quantities of sources and information and a constant need to re-evaluate the methods used within an archaeology of a more recent past.This thesis falls within what is usually referred to as contemporary archaeology, a fairly young sub-discipline of archaeology. Few large research projects have so far been published, and methods have been described as still somewhat experimental. Through my fieldwork it has been possible to acknowledge and highlight the problems and opportunities within contemporary archaeology. It has become clear how the materials stretch both through time and place demonstrating the complex process of how the material that archaeologists investigate can be created. The material of the Iron Curtain, is also well worth studying in its own right.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mats Burström

Anna Mcwilliams

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Archaeology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journeys 2013, 14 (1): 68-88.

This article examines visits by French people to the former Soviet prison camp in Tambov, Russia, where Alsatians-Mosellans men were imprisoned during World War II. Because the memory of these prisoners of war, conscripted by force into the German army during the war is disappearing together with the witnesses, some survivors organized in the 1990s journeys to the Tambov former prison camp, called “pilgrimages.” There are currently two kinds of pilgrimages: pilgrimages for survivors of the camp and their close relatives and pilgrimages for grandchildren of former Tambov inmates. This article suggests that the pilgrims, confronting their past, are engaged with a process of identity making, and that pilgrimage provides pilgrims with the opportunity to confront their grief for the dead or their sense of injustice and to let go of the past. The article concludes that with the pilgrimage the value of Tambov as a place of death is re-evaluated.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Florence Fröhlig

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Asian Public Policy 2013, 6 (2): 196-212.

International organizations, both public and private, promote trade and market development based on rules and standards created primarily by developed countries in the West. This reflects historical legacies associated with the construction of the post-war order, the historical dominance of western economic powers, as well as specific conceptualizations of the role of states, markets and modes of regulation. Indeed, these manifest forms of regulation, conceptions of safety and risk and reflect specific socio-political contexts defined predominantly by western attitudes and social norms. Equally, private sector organizations have also transmitted regulatory norms, standards and risk perceptions into emerging market contexts, in part reflecting the end-consumer markets in which they operate and thus the need to instil within their value chains compliance standards in order to continue to operate within a specific regulatory context. In emerging regions such as Asia, however, different forms of political organization and socio-economic contexts experience predominantly western forms of regulation in manifestly different ways. In areas such as food safety and risk regulation, for example, the transmission of regulatory norms and standards across borders from developed to emerging economy contexts can have far-reaching and sometimes adverse consequences. Specifically, the transmission of western private regulatory norms have implications for Asian food producers, market access, the organization of food value chains, the costs imposed on food producers and farmers and the sustainability of farming practices. As this article seeks to demonstrate, the imposition of such regulatory norms and standards on Asian food producers may lead to the gradual 'disembedding' of Asian food markets and cause problems for compliance, distributional justice and social well-being.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Karolina Zurek


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Göteborg : Daidalos, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sven-Eric Liedman

Anders BurmanRebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Mardin Tebliğleri. Istanbul : Hrant Dink Vakfi, 2013. 14-23.

Keynote speech given at opening of Hrant Dink Foundation's conference in Mardin, Turkey November 2012. It deals with the various witness testimony on the genocide of the Assyrian and Armenian peoples living in the town of Mardin in 1915.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Communicating the North. Farnham : Ashgate, 2013. 263-287.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Journal of Contemporary European Studies 2013, 21 (3): 357-371.

This article analyses the background, activities and reception of the Swedish power investigation (1985–1990). It argues that the power investigation had to navigate between two distinct expectations: on the one hand, the investigation was to expose private power in the interest of equality and justice; on the other hand, it was to improve the exercise of public power in the interest of democracy and efficiency. Because of this two-fold objective, the power investigation was criticised for having neither disclosed private power openly enough, nor pointed out possible ways of adequately rejuvenating welfare state policies clearly. However, the article concludes that one may also assess the power investigation insofar as it served to reconceptualise the socio-political language of welfare state politics in general, as a result of the power inherent in the right to investigate power.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Zhurnalistika v 2012 godu. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Гендер и СМИ [Gender and Media]. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism Lomonosov Moscow State University, 2013. 200-204.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Гендер и СМИ [Gender and Media]. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism Lomonosov Moscow State University, 2013. 205-220.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Zhurnalistika i mediarynok 2013, 7-8 : 74-76.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2013, VI (2): 54-55.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Languages of Exile. Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013. 243-260.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2013. (Working Paper ; 2013:1)

This report focuses on IKEA’s management and communication surrounding sustainability in general and chemical risks specifically. IKEA’s work is analysed in relation to theoretical concepts around responsibility, supply chain, and governance . The report focuses on IKEA’s visions and organizational structures, its policy instruments to deal with chemical risks, supplier-relations and communication and learning. The study is based on previous scholarly literature, analyses of relevant documents, a field visit at a few of IKEA’s suppliers in southern India, as well as interviews with staff working at IKEA in Sweden. The report focuses on IKEA’s systems and processes for dealing with chemical risks, and not on the implementation of such measures in quantitative terms.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Maria JönssonMichael Gilek

Mikael Karlsson

Magnus Boström


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and EducationSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental ScienceMedia and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

European Journal of Scandinavian Studies 2013, 43 (2): 245-257.

In this article, we study the relationship between the United States of America and Norden, first showing how images of the Nordic model were constructed and reproduced in the United States from the 1920s until the 1960s. We find both utopias and dystopias in these narratives. Second, the article argues that these American images, narratives, and stereotypes did not only fulfill a function in the American debate, but were also relayed back to Norden, and affected debate, nation-branding strategies, and self-understandings there. During the Cold War, furthermore, the Nordic welfare state image gained a new currency which reached well beyond national borders, far into transnational space.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Klaus Petersen

Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Öncesi ve Sonrasi ile 1915 Inkar ve Yuzlesme. Ankara : Ütopya Yayinevi, 2013. 40-45.

Short description  of the genocide of the Assyrians during World War I.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2013, 1 : 28-29.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Margareta Tillberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2013, 1 (1): 10-13.

Interview with political scientist Vladimir Tismaneanu about the condition of history discipline in Romania nowadays and its clashes with politics.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

This dissertation concerns the legacy of the Nazi forced enlistment during World War II and focuses more precisely on the case of Alsace/Moselle. Many of these French men, enlisted by force from 1942 in the German army, were sent to the Eastern Front and experienced Soviet prison camps.The aim of this thesis is to examine how knowledge and memories about forced enlistment and Soviet captivity have been remembered, commemorated, communicated and passed on since the Alsatian/Mosellan POWs (Prisoners of War) carried the tokens of enemies or traitors when reintegrating their motherland, France.Four strategies dealing with the experiences of forced enlistment and of internment in Soviet prison camps are examined. I present how the first and most common strategy, i.e. avoidance, is contributing to an individual and collective construction of silence. Then I argue that a second strategy, the constitution of families of remembrance, is helping them to articulate and narrate their experiences (third strategy). The fourth strategy is the organisation of pilgrimages (emic term) to the former prison camp of Tambov, where the majority of the Alsatian/Mosellan POWs were gathered during the war. This last strategy actualises the issue of the transmission of the war experiences given that pilgrimages bring together three to four generations. Through fieldwork observations of the journeys I show how the pilgrims engage with a sense of the past. They remember and reassess the meaning of the past in terms of the social, cultural and political needs of the present. The importance of place and the aspect of self-in-place are thoughtfully analysed in order to highlight the process of passing on the memory of Tambov.I conclude by arguing that the agents of remembrance interviewed for the purpose of this thesis are engaged in turning the tangible and intangible legacies of World War II into heritage. This is done by releasing the legacy of forced enlistment and internment in Soviet prison camp from the private/familial sphere and inscribing it in the public sphere. Yet, the agency of the former POWs and their descendants shows how to let pass a past “that does not want to pass” in a contemporary European context.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Barbro Blehr

Florence FröhligMats Lindqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Encyclopedia of Race and Racism. Detroit ; New York ; San Francisco : Gale Group, 2013. 218-220.

Short encyclopedia article on the Assyrian genocide during world war I in Ottoman Turkey and massacres that continued into 1930s in Iraq.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Diyarbakir Tebligleri. Istanbul : Hrant Dink Vakfi Yayinlari, 2013. 246-261.

Deals with the growth of violence in the Late Ottoman Empire's province of Diyarbakir. It focuses on the deteriorating socio-economic situation of the Assyrian peoples and the pressure put on them by the government and local Kurdish strongmen.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Shatterzone of Empires. Bloomington, Indiana : Indiana University Press, 2013. 317-333.

The Assyrian peoples of Northern Mesopotamia and Eastern Anatolia were traditionally split into several rival religious sects - Nestorians, Jacobites, Chaldeans and various Catholic and Protestant groupings. Confronted by newly awakened Kurdish and Turkish nationalism, there were attempts to unify the various sects. But these efforts failed making the genocide during world war I much easier than if the groups made a common front.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Gewaltgemeinschaften. Göttingen : V&R Unipress, 2013. 251-274.

Deals with the spiralling growth of inter-ethnic violence between Kurds and Assyrians and Syriacs in Eastern Anatolia since the late nineteenth century. Shows how the increasing presence of the central government created an imbalance between ethnic and religious groups and produced a dynamic that created a culture of everyday violence.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

This work analyzes the political instrumentalization of culture. Specifically, it studies how this is done through cultural policy within Western democracies. The analysis takes, as an example, official Nordic cultural cooperation in the post-war period. During this time, cultural exchange among Nordic countries became the subject of political attention establishing itself as part of the Nordic inter-governmental cooperation framework.This work focuses on three key moments in the history of official Nordic cultural cooperation: (i) the failure of the NORDEK plan (a plan which envisaged extensive economic cooperation between the Nordic countries) and the establishment of the Nordic Council of Ministers in 1971; (ii) the collapse of the Soviet system at the end of the 1980s - beginning of the 1990s; and (iii) the movement towards promoting the Nordic region on the global market in the first decade of the 2000s.The analysis traces the lack of convergence between the official arm’s length principle in cultural policy and how cultural cooperation actually worked. The results of the research both demonstrate the various ways culture was instrumentalized and also prove that the politically defined concept of culture can receive different interpretations in the official discourse depending on current political goals.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Nikolas Glover

Anna KharkinaIrina SandomirskajaKekke Stadin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ny Tid 2013, 35 : 10-12.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Journal of Medical Humanities 2013, 34 (3): 347-368.

The main aim of this paper is to reconstruct different aspects of the history of ideas of suicide, from antiquity to late modernity, and contemplate their dialectical tension. Reflexive suicide prevention, drawing on the ancient wisdom that the art of living is inseparable from the art of dying, takes advantage, it is argued, of the contradictory nature of suicide, and hence embraces, rather than trying to overcome, death, pain, grief, fear, hopelessness and milder depressions. This approach might facilitate the transformation of inner shame to inter-personal guilt, which is the precondition for coping with losses through grieving that is shared with others. The traditional projection of suicide on the ‘Other’, reinforced by modernity’s bio-political suppression of death, has inhibited development of good suicide prevention. Awareness of the ambiguity and ambivalence found in suicide may work as a resource when measures are taken to address as many causal mechanisms as possible, and bringing special emphasis to external factors.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2013, VI (1): 53-54.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: All Well in the Welfare State?. Helsinki : Nordic Centre of Excellence NordWel, 2013. 206-231.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: All Well in the Welfare State?. Helsinki : Nordic Centre of Excellence NordWel, 2013. 82-102.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Alanko

Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: All Well in the Welfare State?. Helsinki : Nordic Centre of Excellence NordWel, 2013. 12-25.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Helsinki : Nordic Centre of Excellence NordWel, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Carl Marklund

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Euro Crisis and the State of European Democracy. Florence : European University Institute, 2013. 162-180.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Karolina Zurek


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Polish Sociological Review 2013, 181 : 87-102.

The aim of this article is to suggest an explanatory set of factors to the popularity of gated housing in the Polish context. The explanation focuses on the divide between the public and the private sphere and encompasses economic, cultural and institutional explanations to the gating phenomenon. The empirical material consists of interviews, discourse analysis, a questionnaire, official reports and data, and legal regulation analysis. The Polish example display that both the remnants from the past and the contemporary ideals can be derived from the public-private divide. This divide has played a central role in the negotiations on urban space, the role of housing, and the identities and activities connected to housing and spatial issues since 1989. It is argued that the introduction of market economy followed by socioeconomic inequalities, has resulted in specific forms of creative strategies for individual actions among Poles and to the popularity of gated housing.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Nordisk Østforum 2013, 27 (1): 7-30.

The aim of this article is to examine the reasons behind the growing popularity ofgated communities in Poland by applying cultural, institutional and economic explanationsin the Polish context. The empirical material consists of interviews, newspaperarticles, legal acts concerning housing, official documents and a questionnaire. Thedivide between the public and private spheres is central to the explanatory model, andit is argued that it is this that has played a central role in the emergence and popularityof gated forms of housing in Poland. The introduction of a market economy and subsequentsocio-economic inequalities has resulted in specific forms of individual strategiesregarding housing preferences. It is suggested here that this specific form ofindividualism, connected with institutional shortcomings, cultural legacies and thepresent housing market, is reflected in the enclosed and private living spaces of today’s Poles.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Dominika Polanska

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Hungary and Romania Beyond National Narratives. Oxford : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013. 155-202.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Blomqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Oxford : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Constatin Iordachi

Anders Blomqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Attaining Whiteness is the first book-length sociological study of how ideas about race resonate in post-Soviet Russia. The book charts how tropes of self, hybridity, and maturity constitute important symbolic vehicles for applying the idea of race to the drawing of differences. A new theoretical framework is developed that casts light on fields of study that have not yet received sufficient attention in Western European and American research concerning racial issues. This study of racialization takes a step towards providing a better understanding of how the discourses of race are extended and transformed through the production of social knowledge and social relations. This volume addresses the resilience of genetic criteria for defining cultures and behaviors in both the sciences and humanities in Russia, and also examines the ongoing and pervasive policy of racialized exclusion. The study argues that the concepts and practices of race, whiteness, and Russianness operate ambivalently insofar as they both hold the social fabric together, organizing the perception of the “Other”, but also undermine the unity of society. Racialization thus fosters, first, the sense that Russia belongs to the core of civilization as opposed to the Third World; second, the formulation of policies towards the internal peripheries that support social control informed by the notion of human material; and, finally, the promotion of exclusionary ethnic self-identifications that employ the discourse of hybridity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Vessela Misheva

Mark BassinNikolay Zakharov

Paavo Bergman

Sven Hort


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In the years after WWII the Baltic Sea Area developed into an area strongly divided between East and West. Because of the tensions between the blocs, the coastal areas where strongly militarized and prepared for war.The new political situation after 1989 propelled an international military disarmament and closing down of bases, training areas around Europe. Since the Baltic Sea Area was one of the heaviest militarized part of Europe the question of disarmament here is of particularly great economic, social and cultural importance.This study is about the post-military landscape in the Baltic Sea Area with examples from Dejevo on the Estonian island Saaremaa, Dranske on the (East)German island Rügen and Fårösund on the Swedish island Gotland.The aim of this thesis is to shed light on the process where the military landscape of the Cold War is transformed in order to be incorporated in the macro-regional endeavors for unity in the new Europe. I want to analyze the implications that planning visions have on the everyday life of people. A following aim is to shed light on the challenges that urban planning has to face in this transformation. Three research questions frame the study. The first question analyzes the process where the coastal areas of the Baltic Sea after the end of the Cold War are disarmed and transformed, from a landscape of production of military services and objects into a landscape of consumption for recreation and tourism. The second question takes its point of departure in the relation between planning visions and everyday life. The third question concerns the matter of the past and analyzes what aspects of the military landscape are emphasized respectively pushed aside in the transformation into post-military landscape.The study is based on interviews with inhabitants and local planners as well as macro-regional and local planning documents, articles and photographs.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Birgitta Svensson

Beate Feldmann Eellend

Sören Jansson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Marinarkeologisk tidskrift 2013, 1 : 14-22.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Oscar Törnqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESMARISSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Archaeology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2013, 6 (1): 56-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yulia GradskovaIrina SandomirskajaNadezda Petrusenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

This work constitutes a macro-sociological study of suicide. The empirical focus is on suicide mortality in Russia, which is among the highest in the world and has, moreover, developed in a dramatic manner over the second half of the 20th century. Suicide mortality in contemporary Russia is here placed within the context of development over a longer time period through empirical studies on 1) the general and sex- and age-specific developments in suicide over the period 1870–2007, 2) underlying dynamics of Russian suicide mortality 1956–2005 pertaining to differences between age groups, time periods, and particular generations and 3) the continuity in the aggregate-level relationship between heavy alcohol consumption and suicide mortality from late Tsarist period to post-World War II Russia. In addition, a fourth study explores an alternative to Émile Durkheim’s dominating macro-sociological perspective on suicide by making use of Niklas Luhmann’s theory of social systems. With the help of Luhmann’s macro-sociological perspective it is possible to consider suicide and its causes also in terms of processes at the individual level (i.e. at the level of psychic systems) in a manner that contrasts with the ‘holistic’ perspective of Durkheim. The results of the empirical studies show that Russian suicide mortality, despite its exceptionally high level and dramatic changes in the contemporary period, shares many similarities with the patterns seen in Western countries when examined over a longer time period. Societal modernization in particular seems to have contributed to the increased rate of suicide in Russia in a manner similar to what happened earlier in Western Europe. In addition, the positive relationship between heavy alcohol consumption and suicide mortality proved to be remarkably stable across the past one and a half centuries. These results were interpreted using the Luhmannian perspective on suicide developed in this work. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Vessela Misheva

Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen

Paavo Bergman

Tanya Jukkala


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Balancing between Trade and Risk. London : Routledge, 2013. 15-32.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Karolina Zurek


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

Political parties are essential for parliamentary democracy, the form of government that prevails in most European states. But how have parties adapted to modern society – not least a new layer of political decision-making in the EU? Should we talk of a crisis of party democracy?This book reports the findings of a comparative survey of parties in four Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland and Sweden, all EU member states; and Norway, which remains outside the Union. Using original data, it explores how power is exercised within party organisations and their respective parliamentary groups.Within an analytical framework that envisages a party as a series of delegation relationships, the book illuminates how leaders are chosen, how election candidates are selected, how manifestos are written – and how a party's various elements are co-ordinated. For all the challenges posed by multi-level governance, parties retain much of their capacity for making democracy work.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Magnus Blomgren

Nicholas AylottTorbjörn Bergman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

This thesis focuses on the Soviet painter Tatyana Nazarenko and her position as an influential artist in the Soviet Union of the 1970’s, a decade when Nazarenko depicted everyday life and events from Russian history. The main purpose of this thesis is to shed light upon the importance of especially these motifs in their historical, political and aesthetic context. In this way, the thesis is a study of the artist’s work in a contextual perspective. In order to understand the general conditions for Soviet Art in the 1970´s, and Tatyana Nazarenko´s picture world, the official State-regulated Art is given attention, as Socialist Realism came to be the normative frame of reference for artistic life and the individual artists. Artistic life in the Soviet Union was well regulated and official Art dominated from the early 1930´s until the collapse of the Soviet Union, while especially during the 1970´s, became subjected to so-called unofficial Art, also known as underground. The unofficial, as well as the official Art, became important for Tatyana Nazarenko, for, while not belonging to either side, she came to have a constant relationship with them. She belonged, however, to a small art circle, balancing between the official direction and criticism of the system, later known as permitted. This thesis clarifies the relationship between what is defined as official, permitted and unofficial Art. In exposing her aesthetic strategies, it is shown in what way she deviates from the official and how far the artist could extend the permitted limitations. On the question of her aesthetic strategies a further question arises of how an awareness of history is expressed in motif and form. Finally, the importance of women’s experience in her picture world is discussed. Picture material in this thesis is composed partly of some thirty works from Tatyana Nazarenko´s own production and partly of works with a contextualized and comparative function, encompassing some fifty works taken from Soviet Art History. A few examples from Western Art History constitute further comparative material. The motifs consist mainly of depictions of historical events and pictures of everyday life i.e. genre pictures.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Hedvig Brander Jonsson

Elisabeth Hemby


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Moskva : Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography 2013, 95 (2): 189-204.

Cross-border residential mobility (CBRM) has so far largely been approached from a transnational perspective. However, recent developments in border studies and transnationalism give rise to certain doubts. While border studies have come to include mental borders next to physical borderlands, transnationalism today refers not just to cross-border movements but also to identities trans-cending the national. But border studies have shown that the increased crossing of borders is not necessarily coupled with their diminished significance. CBRM is a particularly interesting phenomenon as it entails the continuous crossing of a physical border, but the question is whether it also implies the erosion of mental borders and the emergence of transnational ties. While drawing on experiences from parallel cases, my study focuses on Poles from Szczecin moving just across the boundary to Vorpommern, Germany. Some are integrating there, but their large majority appears to carry on with everyday life in Poland as before moving. This settlement has triggered considerable resentment among local Germans, who as a reaction mark the borderland discursively and physically. As my survey shows, while both groups regularly cross the physical border, many even among the cross-border residents consider it as a necessary dividing line or prefer cooperation to be reserved to some activities. Hence, unlike longdistance migration leading either to diaspora identities or to gradual dissolution in the majority culture, CBRM appears as a specific form of international migration where the physical proximity allows such intensive links with the country of origin that transnational effects are mitigated.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Péter Balogh


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Geography

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Cheltenham : Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Sten Berglund

Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS) 2013, 19 (7): 692-708.

A huge and continuously growing pit is about to divide the Swedish mining town of Malmberget into two halves. What once was the town centre is now a 200 metres deep hole, and private homes and key buildings like the old school and the church have had to be demolished or moved. The pit is a human imposed ‘landscape scar’ epitomising the town’s lost golden age of mining, its present situation of decline and uncertain future prospects – despite a recent recovery in the mining industry. Although the pit is decisively present in the local community, it is not articulated as significant, especially not from a heritage perspective. Why is this so? In this article, we examine the pit as a potential cultural tool for heritage processes, and find that it is indeed used by individuals in this respect, but not in collective memorialisation. We conclude that landscape scars definitely can constitute critical cultural tools, although they may not always need to be labelled as belonging to an ‘authorized heritage discourse’. Instead, the potential of the landscape scar is to enhance the amount and recognition of shared memories in the local community.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Krister Olsson

Anna Storm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Socialgerontologi. Lund : Studentlitteratur, 2013. 93-118.

Handlar om hur synen på äldre människor varierar genom historien och mellan olika kulturer. Kapitlet är en del av en lärobok.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Historisk Tidskrift (S) 2012, 132 (3): 560-561.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Helene Carlbäck

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: On conference website. : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Patricia Jonason

Mai-Brith Schartau

Michal Bron Jr

Magnus Boström


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental StudiesSchool of Social Sciences
Environmental SciencePolitical SciencePublic Law

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michal Bron Jr


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michal Bron Jr


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Michal Bron Jr


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Painful Pasts and Useful Memories, Remembering and forgetting in Europe. Lund : Centre for European studies (CFE) at Lund university, 2012. 73-89.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yuliya Yurchuk

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

An allegory of the omnipotent state, the Leviathan occurs in Lidia Ginzburg’s notes from 1943-44 and in the context of her reflections on the experiences of surviving in, and living on after, the unprecedented human catastrophe of the siege of Leningrad. Ginzburg describes her time as the “era of great experiences and tests” which started in 1914: the era of world wars with their “maximum non-freedom” and the “absolute non-freedoms” imposed by the all-powerful state, the Leviathan. The siege of Leningrad is not an exception from such a history, but a culmination of the “non-freedoms” of Soviet and, more broadly, European modernity of the twentieth century. All of these events/experiences produced a generation that “became history’s experimental material. And history burned it and disemboweled it and minced it into a bloody mess.” In the siege of Leningrad, various dimensions of “non-freedom”— total mobilization and total war, state terror, and mass death – culminate, converge, and confirm one another.  In the struggle for survival amidst destruction, repression, and starvation, Ginzburg tries to understand the Leviathan, the omnipotent state that sanctions and orchestrates the massive obliteration of life. The new Leviathan emerges as a complex aggregate of different power technologies involving various aspects of life and, hence, producing different overlapping regimes of “non-freedoms.”According to Ginzburg, the subject is involved in the workings of the Leviathan in many ways. Moreover, as exemplified by the experience of the civilian in the siege, the individual depends on the Leviathan for elementary survival. This political and biopolitical complexity makes Ginzburg’s critique more challenging than the trivial understanding of “non-freedom” as a mere deprivation of rights. Matters of life and death in the siege, as Ginzburg’s witness account shows, are deeply politicized, and the power to administer and distribute life and death constitute the foundation of the New Leviathan’s omnipotence. The New Leviathan’s three vectors of power – repression, discipline, and biopower — each in their own way contribute to the destruction of the human and usher a new, post-human historical subject summed up in the figure of distrofik (a patient of starvation disease in the terminal stage) overpowered by the total indifference between life and death, between living and surviving. I propose to look at the strategies and politics involved in such a subjectivity, with a special emphasis on the “choreography” of besiegement: its spatio-temporal structure, its corporeality, and strategies of surviving its post-human condition, as well as the dilemmas of living on “ever after”.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Lydia Ginzburg's Alternative Literary Identities. Oxford [u.a.] : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012. 193-234.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Geografiska Notiser 2012, LXX (3): 141-144.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2012, V (2): 40-47.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Inga Aalia

Kjetil Duvold


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: European exclaves in the process of de-bordering and re-bordering. Berlin : Logos Verlag Berlin, 2012. 11-19.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

IL Ponte 2012, LXVIII (5-6): 127-144.

The essay aims at understanding the nationalist characters present in the cultural discourse of Romanian national-communism by the multilayered analysis of i) communist regime cultural politics, which developed the discourse on the nation in a Marxist-Leninist framework; ii) the keywords around which Romanian public discourse was build since the beginning of modernity until the instauration of communist regime; iii) the marginality of Marxism-Leninism and othe workers' movement in Romania since the 19th century until the communist takeover.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Cambridge Companion to Modern Russian Culture. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012. 65-93.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Soviet and Post-Soviet Identities. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012. 3-16.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Catriona Kelly

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Catriona Kelly

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Huddinge : Arkeologi, Södertörns högskola, 2012. (Södertörn arkeologiska rapporter och studier ; )

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Oscar Törnqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESMARISSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Archaeology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Marinarkeologisk tidskrift 2012, 4 : 17-20.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Oscar Törnqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESMARISSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Archaeology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2012, 9 may : online-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anders Nordström

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2012, 5 (3-4): 37-44.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Thomas Borén

Jonas LindströmDominika Polanska

Péter Balogh

Thomas LundénZhanna Kravchenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Rethinking Cultural Transfer and Transmission. Groningen : Barkhuis, 2012. 61-74.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Kleberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Aksenov and the Environs = Аксенов и окрестности. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2012. 105-121.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Kleberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2012, 5 (1): 18-24.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Kleberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Neprikosnovennyj zapas 2012, 82 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie 2012, 117 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Power and Legitimacy. London : Routledge, 2012. 188-198.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Embracing Arms Cultural Representation of Slavic and Balkan Women in War. Budapest : Central European University Press, 2012. 131-151.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: And They Lived Happily Ever After. Budapest : Central European University Press, 2012. 145-164.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yulia Gradskova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: And They Lived Happily Ever After. Budapest : Central European University Press, 2012. 25-46.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Helene Carlbäck

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: And They Lived Happily Ever After. Budapest : Central European University Press, 2012. 1-22.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Helene CarlbäckYulia GradskovaZhanna Kravchenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary StudiesSchool of Social Sciences
HistorySociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

BBC historia i fokus 2012, 6 : 88-89.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Historielärarnas Förenings Årsskrift 2012, : 7-21.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

NEO 2012, 1 : 6-7.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Kalla kriget. Stockholm : Axel och Margaret Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse, 2012. 83-96.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Svenska Dagbladet 2012, 27 januari : 19-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Dagens Nyheter 2012, 4 januari : 7-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Birgitta Almgren

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Stockholm : Regeringskansliet, 2012. (Underlagsrapport till Framtidskommissionen ; 6)

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Malmö : Liber, 2012.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Lina Pilo

Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Politics, Culture and Socialization 2012, 3 (1-2): 179-196.

Previous research has paid much attention to citizen dissatisfaction and the trends of growing political disaffection, cynicism, and scepticism – in short, the emergence of 'critical citizens'. Also, more recently, critical citizens have sometimes been viewed as an asset for democracy. However, despite both pessimistic and optimistic interpretations of public criticism, the issue of conceptualizing negative attitudes has received less attention. The present study was conducted to enrich understanding of this particular dimension of citizens' attitudes. To this end, the paper suggests an alternative theoretical framework for analysing various forms of negative political orientations. The framework has been tested empirically using three types of statistical procedures, which demonstrate its validity and usefulness.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Ali Abdelzadeh

Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Human Affairs 2012, 22 (3): 283-300.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Erik Amnå

Joakim Ekman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Respons 2012, 5 : 36-37.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Storm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Industrial heritage around the Baltic Sea. Uppsala : Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2012. 171-185.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anna Storm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Europe's World 2012, Autumn (22): 132-133.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Stellinger

Karolina Zurek


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: ECREA 2012 Conference Proceedings. : ECREA: European Communication Research and Education Association.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

One of the few well-known Russian women politicians Irina Khakamada wrote in her book “Sex in big politics”: “[As awoman] you are welcome to be sniper, tamer, war reporter. You are, however, not welcome to politics, because politics ispower”. The way women politicians are perceived in political circles, as well as in public in general, to a high degreedepends on politicians’ media representations. It makes intersection of gender, media, and politics, and its dimensionalcomplex of powers, an especially important arena to study. With few women in the political sphere and highly feminizedjournalistic profession, Russia constitutes an interesting case, especially taking into account the Soviet interpretation ofgender equality achievement and the Post-Soviet backlash. Journalists and editors of the Russian quality press will beinterviewed in an attempt to answer the question why, when and by what means women politicians are gender framed in themedia discourse.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Acting-Up. : .

In a time when neo-conservative tendencies in gender representations are acquiring more and more popularity in the media worldwide – and the domain of humour is certainly no exception (e.g. the US show The Talk) – are there parallel trends to be detected in countries where feminism never has received widespread recognition, as in the case of Russia? What can we learn about gender stereotypes from contemporary Russian infotainment TV shows? This paper will explore these questions by studying two popular shows, Projectorparishilton (“The Paris Hilton’ Projector”) and Devchata (“The Girls”). These weekly ironic-analytical programmes are broadcast prime time on the national channels Channel One and Rossiya-1 and somewhat resembling the format of programmes like Loose Women and The View. With its four male anchors, Projectorparishilton aimed to attract a younger and more progressive audience of both genders and from the beginning ignored any specific gender orientation. By contrast, Devchata – with its female anchors – was explicitly launched with a female audience as their target group, producing a type of humour recognized by essentialists as “female”.Applying a critical perspective, we study verbal and non-verbal constituents of the programmes (including music, gestures, etc.), the interior of the studio, the appearance, behaviour (and jokes!) of the anchors, in order to study how gender, age, culture and nationality are encoded/signified. Based on Laura Mulvey’s term “male gaze”, we introduce the notion of “male humour”, which is implicit not only in the way the anchors appear as subjects and objects of jokes; but also in the position taken by the viewer, regardless of gender. At heart, we question the gendered nature of humour in general and the creation of “women’s space” in the media, which in fact is a reinforcement of traditional gender (and other) stereotypes.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Zhurnalistika v 2011 godu. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Mass Media after Post-Socialism. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism, MSU.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Гендер и СМИ [Gender and Media]. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism Lomonosov Moscow State University, 2012. 172-196.

This article is an attempt to theorize around such three extensive concepts as fashion, politics, and gender. Broadly covered in academic research, the theme of fashion and representation of female politicians, however, requires further analysis and new definitions. Coming from the media studies and having in mind the two common approaches to interconnections between media and politics, namely mediatized politics and politicized media, we transfer these approaches into the sphere of fashion and introduce the notions of politicized fashion and fashionized politics. By doing that, we, on the one hand, are suggesting to view fashion as a part of the political communication sphere[1], as one of the many existing mediums, involved into production and reproduction of the political ideas. On the other hand, fashion can be understood on a more significant level as production and marketing of new styles, which makes it a broad field, of which political and any other communication is just a part.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Journal of Economics 2012, 12 (2): 89-108.

This paper investigates the dynamics of FDIs in the Baltic Sea Region (BSR) by applying the Poisson Pseudo-Maximum Likelihood estimation method on a gravity model. In particular, we analyze the influence of macro and spatial factors on investment stock changes and discuss whether the origin of these investments and the 2004 EU enlargement have had any effects on BSR FDIs.Our results suggest that EU enlargement has been significant for FDI activity in the region, and that FDI is basically a regional issue as it tends to be bilateral within the region. However, the same results also suggest that geographic distance is not a significant factor. We conclude that while being traditional in nature, the BSR FDI pattern is undergoing changes towards a lesser degree of geographic bias.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mikael LönnborgMikael Olsson

Richard Nakamura


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESENTER forumSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2012, 5 (3-4): 79-80.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap 2012, 1 (2): 44-46.

Recension av tre böcker om armeniska folkmordet utkommna under 2011 och 2012

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Limes: Borderland studies 2012, 5 (2): 128-144.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Eurasian geography and economics 2012, 53 (5): 553-556.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2012, 5 (3-4): 83-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Margareta Tillberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2012, 3-4 (4): 80-82.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: East European Diasporas, Migration and Cosmopolitanism. London and New York : Routledge, 2012. 13-24.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Looking at the Onlookers and Bystanders. Stockholm : Living History Forum, 2012. 143-165.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Apostolis Papakostas

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

RIG 2012, 95 (3): 129-154.

"From Blood-Stained Colonial Sugar to Life-Essential Blood Sugar: Swedish-European Themes in the Global Cultural History of Sugar"Drawing on material cultural studies and classical intellectual history, a cultural history of sugar in Sweden and Europe is reconstructed. The aim is to identify the modern conceptualisations of sugar and historically analyse their dialectical sympathies and antipathies. What are the historical reasons for eating—or not eating—sugar, and how are these actualised today? Sugar’s history is followed from antiquity, the middle ages and the Enlightenment up till the present. Sugar was spread in wider European circles only from the 1600s onwards, which triggered various conflicts that in many respects are still current. Was sugar a medicine or a poison, essential or fatal? Sugar played a powerful role in the creation of European wealth and has become intrinsically connected to Western modernity. With a contrastive departure in Mintz (1986) it is shown how the conceptualisations of sugar have changed from signifying an exclusive medicine, spice and sweetener to an omnipresent food (more recently, it might also be referred to as a drug). Cookbooks indicate that sugar in Sweden was transformed into a mass-consumed food during the 1830s. One hundred years later sugar was among Swedish bureaucrats elevated into the utmost important foodstuff of the future, to which the country had committed itself. Increasing the prevalence and consumption of cheap, energy-rich and chemically pure sugar was considered modern, rational and ethical. By eating sugar a Swede could literally eat happiness, freedom and modernity. Even critics of sugar consumption have since the 18th century associated modernity with sugar. Sugar crystals embodied civilization’s inequality and degeneration. When scientists in the 1840s enthusiastically discovered that sugar in humans was transformed into ‘blood sugar’, a poetical motive from 1700s slavery criticism was ironically recycled, in which ‘sugar’ had been attributed with ‘blood’ in order to discourage people’s consumption. The medical identification of sugar (sucrose) and blood sugar (glucose) meant that sucrose increasingly was regarded as essential, which gradually helped to consolidate the prevailing idea of ​​carbohydrates as the primary energy source. Although preference for sweetness is genetic, cultural circumstances determine the forms and scope of sugar consumption. If sugar previously was a status marker of the aristocracy, it has accompanied by new medical discoveries increasingly become emblematic for the junk food of the underprivileged. Sugar’s white colour, purity, status of ‘blood sugar’, ethereal lightness and historic significance for national growth and autarky, are, however, examples of cultural factors which still legitimise sugar’s omnipresence in society. In today’s polarised debate about possible threshold values or penalty taxes, many opinions ventilated even in commercial, medical and public health discourses implicitly relate to older religious and cultural ideas and practices.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Wprowadzenie do problematyki globalnych reżimów regulacyjnych. Torun : Wydawnictwu Adam Marszalek, 2012. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Karolina Zurek


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Time and Space in Words and Music. Frankfurt am Main : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012. 73-85.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation) 2012, 10 (2): 752-764.

This article was written in order to contribute to a discussion about a critical definition of alternative media. Askingwhat role alternative media could play in challenging neoliberal discourse in an age where capitalism have become immune to criticism, it elaborates on the concept of “the alternative” and the media through three sections. The first section discusses neoliberalism and the connection between neoliberal doctrine and mainstream media. This connection is described as promoting “public amnesia”, financialization and economization of news journalism. The second section discusses alternative media from the perspective of new social movements and symbolic resistance, claiming that the symbolic resistance framework undermines the critical potential of alternative media, it also comments on some recent critical literature on neoliberalism and capitalism. The third section takes examples from artistic explorations of capitalism and television to propose how a distinction between social and formalist aspects of “the alternative” could inform a critical notion of alternative media.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Linus Andersson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2012.

Critic, poet, and translator, Ivan Aksenov was a remarkable representative of the Russian avant-garde but his life and works long remained forgotten. This book of essays by authors from nine different countries sheds light on the writer's extraordinary contribution to Russian culture.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Aleksei Semenenko

Lars Kleberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Huddinge : Arkeologi, Södertörns högskola, 2012. (Södertörn arkeologiska rapporter och studier ; )

Under 2011 initierade institutet MARIS ett projekt inom vilket Skånes och Blekinges submarina stenålder avses undersökas.Syftet med denna förstudie är att finna en lämplig metod för en första avgränsning av sökrummet och sedan peka ut lokaler/delområdenmed stor potential för förekomst av välbevarade tidigmesolitiska boplatser eller andra aktivitetsytor (t ex fiskefällor,jaktstationer) inom två utvalda områden i Blekinge vid Stärnö och Biskopsmåla skärgårdar. Områdena har valts av Länsstyrelsen i Blekinge efter samråd med naturvårdsintressen. Denna förstudie bidrara lltså till att kunna avgränsa sökytan inom redan utpekade områden.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Oscar Törnqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESMARISSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Archaeology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

This dissertation analyses social critique, communication critique and aestheticalcritique in television produced by artists. Theoretically it draws on researchon alternative media, TV studies, especially genre analysis and narratology,and media aesthetics. It conducts a text-production study of three examplesof alternative television from the period 2004-2008: ContemporaryArt Center TV (CAC TV): A show produced by the CAC in Vilnius, Lithuaniaand aired on a commercial TV-channel; Good TV who aired video art ona local public access channel in Stockholm, Sweden; and Candyland TV, apirate transmission from an art gallery in central Stockholm.Empirically it builds on TV-texts, web sites and documents, as well asinterviews with participants. Through a study of form and stylistics, relationto conventional genres and modes of narration, it engages in a discussionabout the features of a critical, alternative media text.The study shows how these televisions work in a tradition of alternativetelevision and connects them to tactics and aesthetical forms as found inhistorical examples, but also how this type of formalist media critiquemight inform an understanding of alternative media. From the analysis ofrelations between social and formalist aspects of alternative television, adistinction between alternative as ”alternative worldview” and as ”alternativeexpressions” is suggested, a distinction that contributes to the developmentof theory in the study of alternative media.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Stig Arne Nohrstedt

Göran Bolin

Linus Andersson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Social Relations in Ottoman Diyarbekir, 1870-1915. Leiden : Brill Academic Publishers, 2012. 241-266.

Relations between Christians and Kurds worsened in Late Ottoman times. This article traces the dynamic in which neighborliness and coexistence ultimately led to genocide.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

David Gaunt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2012, 5 (2): 11-31.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kaisa Kaakinen

Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Jahrbuch / Deutsche Akademie für Sprache und Dichtung 2012, 2011 : 82-86.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Tid för Europa. Göteborg : Daidalos, 2012. 45-59.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

New York : Routledge, 2012.

Whether in science or in international politics, neutrality has sometimes been promoted, not only as a viable political alternative but as a lofty ideal – in politics by nations proclaiming their peacefulness, in science as an underpinning of epistemology, in journalism and other intellectual pursuits as a foundation of a professional ethos. Time and again scientists and other intellectuals have claimed their endeavors to be neutral, elevated above the world of partisan conflict and power politics. This volume studies the resonances between neutrality in science and culture and neutrality in politics. By analyzing the activities of scientists, intellectuals, and politicians (sometimes overlapping categories) of mostly neutral nations in the First World War and after, it traces how an ideology of neutralism was developed that soon was embraced by international organizations.This book explores how the notion of neutrality has been used and how a neutralist discourse developed in history. None of the contributions take claims of neutrality at face value – some even show how they were made to advance partisan interests. The concept was typically clustered with notions, such as peace, internationalism, objectivity, rationality, and civilization. But its meaning was changeable – varying with professional, ideological, or national context. As such, Neutrality in Twentieth-Century Europe presents a different perspective on the century than the story of the great belligerent powers, and one in which science, culture, and politics are inextricably mixed.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Geert Somsen

Rebecka Lettevall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Subaltern 2012, 1 : 29-36.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

There is a tendency in archaeology dealing with watercraft landing sites in a wider context to assume a direct relationship between sites in coastal and shore-bound areas and the practise of landing, without any deeper practical or theoretical exploration of the reality of any such relationship. This problem has its origins in the poor archaeological and conceptual definitions of watercraft landing sites obstructing any real understanding of the role of these sites in the maritime cultural landscape. Landing sites are taken for granted and they are undervalued as an archaeological source of explanation; notwithstanding, the concept of the landing site is readily used in archaeology in order to underpin archaeological interpretations on the maritime activities of past societies.In order to break away from the simplified understandings of past water-bound strategies based on the undefined concept of the landing site, this dissertation suggests a definition of watercraft landing sites in a wider social sense as water-bound contact zones; places of social interaction that can be archaeologically identified and investigated. This perspective integrates the understanding of the intentional character of human activity related to watercraft landing with the remaining archaeological traces. Archaeological definitions of landing sites that can be tested against the archaeological data are provided, and thereby, the dissertation contributes with the possibility to archaeologically evaluate and approach the social function of watercraft landing sites. This dissertation demonstrates that there can be an archaeology of landing sites.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Frands Herschend

Kristin Ilves


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

How do young people in Estonia experience the political, politics and citizenship? How are these civic experiences connected to young peoples’ experiences with the media? Anne Kaun’s thesis Civic Experiences and Public Connection presents a theoretical and empirical investigation of how civic experiences, particularly public connection, emerge in the context of contemporary Estonia. Employing open-ended online diaries and in-depth interviews, she aims to develop an in-depth understanding of how young people experience democracy today, and how they express themselves as citizens; expression not only through the physical performance of citizenship, but also through orientation, interest in, and reflection about issues that are of common concern or should be seen as such. The empirical investigation of public connection as critical media connection, playful public connection and historical public connection, is based on narrative analysis and embedded in a theoretical exploration of key concepts in the context of civic culture studies, namely the political, politics and citizenship.Combining Chantal Mouffe’s conflict theory with Paul Ricoeur’s narrative identity, Kaun aims to shed light on contemporary democracy from the citizens’ perspective. The author proposes a holistic approach to both civic experiences and the role that media might play in relation to them. Following a non-media- centric approach, she shows that media, despite their ubiquity, are an important but not exclusive source of the civic experiences of young adults in Estonia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Staffan Ericsson

Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Zoroastrianism is ascribed to the teachings of the legendary prophet Zarathustra and originated in ancient times. It was developed within the area populated by the Iranian peoples, and following the Arab conquest, it formed into a diaspora. In modern Russia it has evolved since the endof the Soviet era. It has become an attractive object of cultural productiondue to its association with Oriental philosophies and religions and its rearticulation since the modern era in Europe.The lasting appeal of Zoroastrianism evidenced by centuries of book publishingin Russia was enlivened in the 1990s. A new, religious, and even occult dimension was introduced with the appearance of neo-Zoroastrian groups with their own publications and online websites (dedicated to Zoroastrianism). This study focuses on the intersectional relationships and topical analysis of different Zoroastrian themes in modern Russia.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anna Tessmann


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Comparative Religion

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Budapest : Central European University Press, 2012.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Helene CarlbäckYulia GradskovaZhanna Kravchenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary StudiesSchool of Social Sciences
HistorySociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

This dissertation examines the implementation of the SS’s Greater Germanic idea in the Danish border region of South Jutland. Its focus is on how Danish and ethnic German (volksdeutsche) national socialists, organised in their respective Nazi parties, dealt with the SS’s crusade on behalf of a supranational racial vision. The study traces why the two groups reacted so negatively to the SS’s ideology - despite the SS’s power, despite the Greater Germanic promise of high racial prestige, and despite shared service in “Germanic” units of the Waffen-SS.The SS’s attempts to use a race-based ideology to overcome the disputes that divided South Jutland’s two Nazi parties ran aground on fundamentally nationalist identities. For most members of the German minority, the Greater Germanic ideology was a threat. The German minority hoped for border revision; to acknowledge Danes as racial equals would endanger their political goals. Nor were Danish Nazis more enthusiastic. To be sure, the SS’s vision did provide an ideological weapon in the fight against demands for border vision. But the potential imperialism of the Greater Germanic idea worried those who prized continued Danish sovereignty. After all, the first hope of the Danish Nazis was to rule an independent national-socialist Danish state.The study makes it clear, however, that the fate of the Greater Germanic idea cannot be understood simply in terms of Realpolitik. Rather, the conflicts between the SS and its collaboration partners must also be understood as a clash between racial and völkisch concepts of community. The SS's vision of a Greater Germanic Reich based on ideologies of race clashed with the German-minority and Danish national-socialist commitment to Volk-based nationalism. Despite their strong commitment to Nazi ideologies, both collaboration partners found the SS’s racial community “unimaginable”.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Anu-Mai Kõll

Steffen Werther

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2012, 4 (1): 46-46.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Markus Huss

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative Literature

Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Journal of Nautical Archaeology 2012, 41 (1): 94-105.

In the context of the development of different kinds of watercrafts during prehistory an interdependent line of development for landing sites and harbours is often suggested and used to argue that it is almost impossible to archaeologically locate small and early landing sites. Although the constructional properties of prehistoric watercrafts suggest that landing structures were not compellingly necessary, there is nevertheless archaeological evidence of landing facilities already from Stone Age as well as landing facilities for smaller boats to consider. This article will discuss to what extent ship archaeological evidence could be seen in a corresponding development to landing sites in its respective periods.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristin Ilves


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

International journal of cultural studies 2012, 15 (2): 181-196.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Stina Bengtsson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Party Politics 2012, 18 (2): 193-214.

Scholars of women’s parliamentary presence have suggested that the proportion of women parliamentarians rests on the interaction between intra-party and party external conditions, and that these can be discussed in terms of necessity and sufficiency. Still, the field lacks systematic cross-case assessments of such relationships. This research takes an explorative approach to necessity, sufficiency and interaction in the field of gender and party. Using fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis to study 57 individual West European parties, it demonstrates that party behaviour is a function of intra-party and party-external conditions. Furthermore, it shows that when the external factors are not present, parties are themselves able to achieve gender-balanced parliamentary delegations. The article reveals that there are several paths to gender balance, and that the absence of conditions sufficient for balance does not explain why parties do not become gender balanced

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Emelie Lilliefeldt


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2011, IV (2): 44-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Florence Fröhlig

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Baltic Worlds 2011, 4 : 50-52.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yulia Gradskova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Mastering Russian Spaces. München : Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag GmbH, 2011. 47-64.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Kritika 2011, 12 (4): 1005-1009.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Marshall Poe

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Severnaya Evropa. Moskva : Nauka, 2011. 183-195.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Chaos. Dansk-norsk tidsskrift for religionhistoriske studier 2011, 55 : 91-105.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: De-Bordering, Re-Bordering and Symbols on the European Boundaries. Berlin : Logos Verlag Berlin, 2011. 9-19.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

Annale dell'Istituto per la storia della Resistenza e della società contemporanea in provincia di Modena 2011, I (1): 44-51.

The Modena History Institute, in the timespam 1969-1989, recevied regularly monographs and reviews published by the ISISP, the History Institute of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Romania. The essay aims at explaining Romanian national-communist cultural politics by the analysis of historical discourse contained in the Romanian monographs and reviews stored by the "Romanian fund" at the Modena History Institute.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Francesco Zavatti

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Nordisk Østforum 2011, 25 (2): 182-184.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Gender and Media – 2010. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University, 2011. 105-133.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ekaterina KalininaLiudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: World of Media 2011. Moscow : Faculty of Journalism, Moscow State University, 2011. 114-127.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Liudmila Voronova

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Folia Scandinavica Posnaniensia 2011, 12 : 143-153.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Folia Scandinavica Posnaniensia 2011, 12 : 115-127.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Lars Kleberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

European Policy Analysis 2011, 13 : -12.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Karolina Zurek


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

European Journal of Risk Regulation 2011, 2 : 241-244.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Karolina Zurek


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Nordic Civil Society at a Cross-Roads. Baden-Baden : Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 2011. 151-176.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pelle Åberg


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Puzzles of government formation. London : Routledge, 2011. 129-146.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Ann-Cathrine Jungar

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Archaeology and Ancient History (JAAH) 2011, 2 : 1-31.

Repeatedly, archaeological research on landing sites draws upon the equivalence between a naturally suitable coast and a landing site/harbour. This kind of research emanates from an archaeologically and socially ill-defined landing site concept and has created a basis for arbitrary discussions on the nature of maritime activities of past societies. There is no comprehensive and integrated understanding of the existing variability, character and patterns of landing site behaviour and relations. This article addresses the question of what characterises landing sites for watercrafts in an archaeological and social perspective. If such characteristics can be defined, what are the possibilities of seeing any of these traits in an archaeological material? Defining a landing site as a contact zone where movements and meetings on land and by watercraft take place and are facilitated by the locality as such, a generally applicable model for the archaeological study of landing sites is suggested and checked against three different archaeological case studies from the Baltic Sea region.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristin Ilves


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Marinarkeologisk Tidskrift 2011, 3 : 12-18.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Oscar Törnqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESMARISSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Marinarkeologisk Tidskrift 2011, 1 : 6-9.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Oscar Törnqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESMARISSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Russian Studies 2011, 6 : 46-70.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kristian Petrov


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Cultural Diversity as a Source of Integration and Alienation. Szczecin : Uniwersytet Szczeciński, 2011. 33-47.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Péter Balogh

Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

International Journal of Humanities and Social Science 2011, 1 (4): 135-146.

Many contemporary researchers of female violence claim that gender stereotypes dominate works about militant women. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the historical works about the Russian female terrorists in order to find out whether those stereotypes influence its contents and the scholars’ conclusions. Typology of the gender stereotypes that exist in the works about women terrorists is constructed in the article and used for the analysis of the historical literature. The article is concluded with the discussion about what is to be done in order to avoid the gender stereotypes and write a new balanced research on the topic.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Nadezda Petrusenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Asian Social Science 2011, 7 (8): 35-48.

Comparative analysis is a mode of research, that due to its outstanding merits is widely used within many fields of scientific inquiry. Focusing on its application in historical research, this article aims to contribute to a more systematic discussion of some of the methodological strategies associated with this mode of analysis. For this purpose, this article presents first a few typologies regarding the functions and leverages of comparative analysis. In the next step different styles in which comparative method is applied are exemplified, with especial attention paid to the comparative studies of large-scale, macro-level societal changes. This article ends then with a critical discussion of the potentials and limitations of comparison as a methodological strategy of generating historical generalisations.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Reza Azarian

Nadezda Petrusenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2011. ( ; )

This report has been produced within the interdisciplinary RISKGOV project with the overall aim of comparing risk assessment – risk management interactions connected with five severe Baltic Sea environmental risks (eutrophication, overfishing, invasive species, chemical pollution and oil discharges linked to marine transports).Specifically, we compare three major aspects connected with assessment  – management interactions and, based on this analysis, suggest possible routes for improving interaction between science-based advice and environmental (risk) management:Organisational structure of the risk assessment activities and the generation, selection and implementation of management options.The management of scientific uncertainties and disagreements.Implementation of the ecosystem approach to management (EAM) and modes of ‘good governance’.In order to understand these aspects we started by describing and analysing the characteristics of the five risk cases. This revealed substantial differences in terms of sources, effects and complexities (in terms of scientific uncertainty and socio-political ambiguity). For example, chemical risks are associated with great uncertainty and oil spill with much lower; fisheries relate to very high socio-political ambiguity, whereas invasive species show the opposite nature and oil spill fit with more traditional risk parameters. Our analysis also revealed a great variation in the societal risk responses, which far from always seems rational in relation to the risk characteristics.When it comes to the organisational structures, we can conclude that different forms of institutions and institutional arrangements and relations have evolved over time in the various cases, for instance relatively well-formalised in the overfishing case, and rather informal for combating eutrophication. Similarly, we see different forms of expert dependencies. In the overfishing case there are institutionalised formal links between e.g. ICES and the EU Commission and the historic path-dependency is quite strong, thereby causing institutional inertia, even though the development of Regional Advisory Councils (RACs) such as the Baltic RAC are gradually changing the picture. In relation to many other environmental risk cases (e.g. eutrophication and chemicals) HELCOM provides a regional basis for assessment and management (although implementation of management recommendations have often proved complex). Still, assessment-management interactions seem more developed and better organised in the overfishing case, even though it is obvious that the last link, the political decision-making on quotas, has deviated substantially from the science-based advice, thereby opening for continued overfishing. Similarly, well-developed institutions seem to allow for improved deliberative processes for fisheries, including improved analysis of socio-economic dimensions, which we cannot find to the same extent for e.g. chemicals, eutrophication and invasive species.The assessment and management responses we see to the studied risks do not seem to be based on any thorough analysis of the specific risk characteristics, or on the suitability of different overall strategies (e.g. traditional science-based assessment, precautionary, deliberative). Instead, all studied assessment-management interactions can be classified as being built primarily on traditional science-based assessment of risks. Of course, we see elements of for example precaution in e.g. the chemicals case, and deliberation in the fish case, and the inclusion of the EAM as a starting point for assessment exercises and management decisions is becoming more common, but overall this happens only partially and infrequently.Thus, to summarise, we conclude that there are substantial differences among environmental risks in relation to, for example, complexity, uncertainty and ambiguity, and we argue that it is important to maintain a balance between ideals of holistic approaches such as EAM and context dependent requirements of various management objectives, environmental risks and sectors. For example, high levels of uncertainty (e.g. chemical pollution) and ambiguity (e.g. overfishing) can be assumed to require assessment-management approaches focussed on precaution and participatory deliberation, respectively.Furthermore, our analysis identifies six key issues and challenges that, if adequately addressed, may improve assessment-management interactions and facilitate the implementation of the ecosystem approach to management.1. We see a need to further develop the regional and ecosystem basis of assessment-management interactions in terms of addressing prioritised knowledge gaps, as well as developing regional knowledge management and monitoring to strengthen regionally-based scientific advice.2. Integration of various forms of scientific knowledge is currently rather undeveloped in assessment and scientific advice, which reduces possibilities of addressing also the social dimension of sustainable development as well as possibilities of identifying and reducing ‘blind spots’.3. Stakeholder participation requires more consideration since incorporation of practitioner and local knowledge in risk assessments as well as stakeholder deliberation in risk management often are vital for the successful implementation of the ecosystem approach to management.4. We identify substantial room for improvements linked to coping with scientific uncertainty and disagreement in both risk assessment and risk management. We conclude that there in fact are examples of science-based precautionary approaches and methods, but that a comprehensive and coherent strategy for addressing uncertainty is often lacking.5. Interdependencies among environmental risk issues need to be more specifically addressed than today. Climate change will, for example, influence both the outcome of risk assessments as well as the possibilities for successful management in all the studied environmental risk cases.6. Despite a commonly expressed idea of a clear separation between assessment and management, the studied science-policy interactions are in general rather diffuse and politicised. This lack of transparency about how these interactions evolve and are constructed may mislead political decision makers and the public and thus potentially hamper management progress.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Cecilia Lundberg

Katarzyna Smolarz

Michael Gilek

Mikael Karlsson

Oksana Udovyk

Sebastian Linke


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Dagens Nyheter 2011, 05.10 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Teresa Kulawik

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2011, 4 (4): 4-12.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Teresa Kulawik

Renata Ingbrant


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Comparative LiteratureGender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ambio 2011, 40 (2): 221-230.

Between 1985 and 1995, fertility in Eastern Europe declined from 2.2 children per woman to merely 1.5 on region-average. Previous research has emphasized mainly the economic turmoil during transition or the influx of new ideas regarding fertility and family relations. This article suggests that applying a risk management perspective on fertility patterns may put additional light on the reasons behind the fertility decline in post-communist Europe. The complexity of modern social systems has made people increasingly dependent on the state for risk evaluation and risk management. The article formulates the hypothesis that transition itself disrupted the mental models that helped people to navigate among the risks associated to having and raising children. Left to their own devices, women in Eastern Europe became more inclined to postpone childbirth or discard this option altogether.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Johnny Rodin


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Annals of the Association of American Geographers 2011, 101 (4): 783-794.

The relationship between energy systems, on the one hand, and narratives and practices of identity building at different scales, on the other, has received little attention in the mainstream human geography and social science literature. There is still a paucity of integrated theoretical insights into the manner in which energy formations are implicated in the rise of particular cultural self-determinations, even though various strands of work on energy and identity are frequently present throughout the wideand rather disparatecorpus of social science energy research. Therefore, this article explores the manner in which the exploitation and management of energy resources is woven into discourses and debates about national identity, international relations, a nation's path of future development, and its significance on the global arena using the case of Russia. We investigate some of the policies, narratives, and discourses that accompany the attempt to represent this country as a global oenergy superpowero in relation to the resurrection of its domestic economy and material prosperity, on the one hand, and the restoration of its global status as a derzhava (or oGreat Powero), on the other. Using ideas initially developed within the field of critical discourse analysis, we pay special attention to the national identity-building role played by geographical imaginations about the country's past and present energy exports to neighboring states. We argue that they have created a hydrocarbon landscape in which the discursive and material have become mutually entangled to create an infrastructurally grounded vision of national identity.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Stefan Bouzarovski

Mark Bassin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Tvära möten. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2011. 77-95.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Rethinking Time. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2011. 247-255.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

There were many ways of bordering manliness during the historical period covered by my research. Borders have been metaphorically understood as those invisible, often non-enunciated limits that have safeguarded manliness. There were borders separating masculinity from femininity and from childishnes, but there is also a more distant border, separating masculinity from the bestial. The term un-manliness is a useful concept for this analysis, for it can be used to illuminate the different ways in which masculinity has been interrogated. The concept can also be used in comparative analyses of how tolerance towards men deviating from ideas of ideal masculinity has differed according to situation and culture. It has been my ambition to elucidate the particular attitudes, values, customs, knowledge and requirements that influenced the view of masculinity at both individual and the group level. The clearest-cut aspects of manliness and un-manliness expressed in court proceedings were those having to do with sexuality, relations within the household, and the subordinate and dominant masculinities displayed by different court-room actors. The latter, in turn, reflected contemporary social structures, including the social gap that divided the Livonian peasantry’s serfs or former serfs from the ruling Baltic-German elite. Records from the court proceedings have shown the subordinate masculinity of the defendants, subordinate not only to that of the officers of the court but to that of the witnesses. This subordination was an inevitable consequence of the nature of the accusations, regardless of whether they were deemed well-founded or false.  The defendants were placed in a situation where they were forced constantly to be on the alert, ready to defend themselves and show their best sides. As a result, they would often give extremely clear expression to their views of proper masculinity. Such actors stressed, consciously or unconsciously, certain manly traits and behaviour patterns that characterised themselves and others. Their arguments provide insights into what they thought of each other and how they conceived a man should generally be, behave and act in different situations. By the same token, they clearly showed what kinds of behaviours were considered undesirable or outright unmanly. The positioning of the borders of manliness was linked both to time and to space. Deviations have helped different societies set the borders for what they considered acceptable behaviour. There was a clear cultural and geographical border between Sweden as such, and the Swedish province Livonia. This emerges clearly when one compares Livonian results with earlier studies on bestiality in Sweden. This shows that the view of manliness and the tolerance towards certain kinds of behaviour changed as one moved East.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Kekke Stadin

Susanna Sjödin Lindenskoug


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

The Republic of Moldova was one of fifteen states to emerge from the dissolution of the Soviet Union. With weak historical legacy of statehood, deteriorating economy and serious national divisions, the young state lacked many of the prerequisites deemed necessary for successful democratization. From the very beginning of independence, Moldova became the battleground of Romanianists, propagating for the Romanian character of Moldova’s majority population, and Moldovanists, who viewed the people as a separate nation. In the literature on democracy and democratization, a divided nation is singled out as a serious threat to statehood and democratization efforts alike. Without a nation in place it is generally understood that democracy cannot take root.Nevertheless, Moldova in a few years time managed to make considerable progress on its path towards democracy. A main theme of the dissertation is thus the issue of national division and how it has affected political developments in general and democracy in specific. This picture is then further expanded by including close analysis of political support.The dissertation contributes to discussions about how nation and democracy goes together in transitional states with no legacy of either of them. The analysis shows that national division in Moldova works on different levels. While political actors often seek support from the electorate according to their positions on the nation, national identity by itself does not suffice to explain differences in political support. Instead other aspects, such as generational values, degree of urbanity and level of education, play a much larger role. Democracy, as a platform where different political ideas and ambitions may form, can both complicate transitions since it provides opportunities for conflicts, but democracy also holds the prospects to find ways to resolve disagreements. In the long run, this carries the seed of consolidation of both democracy and nation alike.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Elfar Loftsson

Andreas Johansson


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In the late 20th century, the proportions of women and men elected into European national parliaments became increasingly equal. Political parties shape these outcomes by selecting and fielding candidates in elections. Scholars recognise that parties' actions do not occur in isolation; yet there is little systematically comparative research about the configurations of conditions in which these actions occur. Previous research also often relies on studies of West European parties. This doctoral thesis investigates how conditions inside and outside parties combine to create gender-equal parliamentary presence. The thesis examines the extent to which Western European experiences apply to Central and East European parties, and explores the conditions that stand in the way of progress towards gender balance. It presents three empirical studies. The first is a qualitative comparative analysis of 57 West European parties during the late 1980s, a period in which the trend towards equality accelerated. The second study applies the knowledge produced in the first analysis to cases in Central and Eastern Europe. It uses an original dataset covering six parties in four EU member states in a structured focused comparison. Finally, the thesis presents an in-depth case study of an unexpectedly gender-balanced Latvian party. The analyses show that gender-equal parliamentary presence is achieved when conditions inside and outside parties combine, and that no condition is necessary or singularly sufficient. The absence of gender-equal parliaments is sustained by combinations other than the absence of those that lead to gender-balance. Operationalisations from Western Europe turn out to be largely applicable to cases in Central and Eastern Europe. These latter cases also demonstrate that organisational instability need not impede women’s presence in elected office.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Nicholas Aylott

Emelie