About us / Centres

MARIS

Graphic element for MARIS - the Maritime Archaeological Research Institute at Södertörn University The MARIS research institute at Södertörn University carries out and develops maritime archaeological research, with a special emphasis on the Baltic Sea and the surrounding area.

MARIS aims to be a meeting point for national and international Baltic maritime archaeological research and to create opportunities for the exchange of knowledge between maritime archaeologists through networking, seminars, workshops and conferences.

MARIS aims to contribute to the development of maritime archaeology through an active theoretical discussion of research directions and through initiatives to stimulate new maritime archaeological research. An important part of this is to be involved in multidisciplinary collaboration with other fields, community organisations and the commercial world.
 

Projects

Current research projects from Södertörn University's research project database are published here on an ongoing basis. (If the list is empty, there are currently no relevant projects in the database).
Project

Landscapes lost. Photo: Arne SjöströmIn 2011, MARIS launched a new research area. The goal is to conduct archaeological surveys, examine and discuss the sunken landscapes of the early Holocene in the southern Baltic Sea. The project concentrates on the postglacial river mouth of Verkeån, south-east Scania and the Blekinge archipelago. Another interest is the unknown archaeol... (Read more)

Project ManagerFinancierSchool/CentreSubject

Research linked to the Baltic Sea region and Eastern Europe

Yes
KK-stiftelsen

Status

Finished

Historical and Contemporary Studies

MARIS


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Archaeology

SEASIDE - A multidisciplinary study of maritime environmental history

Within the chosen timeframe of this project ranging from the onset of Neolithic (in Sweden some 6000 years ago), it is fairly well known that major changes in land-use have occurred. Deliberate removal of forests, achieved by cutting or fire, has been one of the most significant ways in which humans have modified the environment. Less well known are the environmental effects of historical changes in land-use, especially when it comes to the ecosystem response in coastal and open parts of the... (Read more)

Project ManagerFinancierSchool/CentreSubject

Research linked to the Baltic Sea region and Eastern Europe

Yes
Östersjöstiftelsen

Status

Started

MARIS

Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies

Historical and Contemporary Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Environmental Studies

Environmental Science

Geography

Archaeology

Early-Modern Maritime Battlefields in the Baltic Ocean Discovery

Ocean Discovery - photo Ingemar LudgrenIn the summer of 2011, two spectacular new shipwrecks were found in the central Baltic Sea. After years of searching, the well-preserved remains of both "Mars" (1564) and "Svärdet" (1676) were found. Both we... (Read more)

Project ManagerFinancierSchool/CentreSubject

Research linked to the Baltic Sea region and Eastern Europe

Yes
Östersjöstiftelsen

Status

Started

MARIS

Historical and Contemporary Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

History

Archaeology

Ghost ship. Photo: Johan RönnbyA shipwreck lies in compact darkness, 125 metres down on the seafloor in the middle of the Baltic Sea. It is almost completely intact, even though it sank almost 400 years ago.

In 2003, Deep Sea Productions and MMT (Marin Mätteknik) discovered an exceptionally well-preserved shipwreck about 30 nautical miles east of the island of Gotska Sand&... (Read more)

Project ManagerFinancierSchool/CentreSubject

Research linked to the Baltic Sea region and Eastern Europe

Yes
KK-stiftelsen

Status

Finished

MARIS

Historical and Contemporary Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Archaeology

Drawing of Baltic Shipwreck by Jon AdamsThe Baltic Sea is one of the best locations in the world for ship archaeology. One reason for this is because the majority of organisms that normally consume wood in the oceans are absent from this cold and brackish sea, including the infamous shipworm, Terredo navalis. The hulls of wooden wrecks therefore can stay in one piece, with... (Read more)

Project ManagerFinancierSchool/CentreSubject

Research linked to the Baltic Sea region and Eastern Europe

Yes
KK-stiftelsen

Status

Finished

MARIS

Historical and Contemporary Studies


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Archaeology