Our research

Books in the librarySödertörn University has professional, creative research environments that range over many disciplines and fields.

Our research has a contemporary focus united with an active and critical approach to the past. Many of the research groups and research projects strive to achieve a high level of contemporary and social relevance. The university's research generally has an international focus, even in subjects that traditionally examine their own national cultures and history. A key word is multidisciplinarity.

Publications

Publications from the DiVA publications database are listed here on an ongoing basis.

The 50 most recent publications registered in DiVA, the publication database used by the university, are listed below. Do you want to search among all the publications linked to the university? Go to DiVA.

You can also go to the tabs for Researchers, Projects, Subjects or Centres and find publications linked to the relevant unit.

Publications

In: Hunger and Malnutrition as major challenges of the 21st Century. : World Scientific, 2019. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Priya Rampal

Ranjula Bali

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2019

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Economics

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Ett liv som handledare. Uppsala : Uppsala universitet, 2018. 5-16.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Peter Hedberg

Mikael Lönnborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

ENTER forumSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Ett liv som handledare. Uppsala : Uppsala universitet, 2018. 17-34.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mikael Lönnborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

ENTER forumSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Uppsala : Uppsala universitet, 2018.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Peter Hedberg

Mikael Lönnborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

ENTER forumSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

2018, : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Katarina Giritli-Nygren

Jenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Mikael Lönnborg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

ENTER forumSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Ecology & society 2018, : -.

In recent decades consensus-oriented decision making has become increasingly common in the management of natural resources due to the recognition that collaborative processes may enhance the legitimacy of decision making and facilitate effective implementation. Previous research has identified a number of problems with the design and practical facilitation of collaborative processes. Structured decision making (SDM) has been developed as an alternative suitable for decision making characterized by complexity, stakeholder controversy and scientific uncertainty. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility and practical relevance of collaboration and dialogue inspired by SDM in the sphere of forest management. The methods used include analyses of records of meetings and semi-structured interviews with participating stakeholders and organizers of a collaborative process focused on improving the management of Swedish forests in the young forest phase. The results show that the SDM rationale of step-by-step teamwork, the involvement of experts, and guidance by an independent facilitator has a number of merits. These included the creation of genuine discussion with careful consideration of different interests and values, thus building trust among stakeholders and the Forest Agency. However, at the end of the process some issues still remained unclear, including how the decision options would be made practically useful and accessible to forest owners. Furthermore, concerns were raised about the lack of novelty of the options. As a result, there was uncertainty about the extent to which the options would contribute to a more varied forest landscape given the multiple values involved. The paper concludes with some remarks on the potential future of engaging SDM in the forestry sector.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Camilla Sandström

Johanna Johansson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Arche - tidskrift för psykoanalys, humaniora och arkitektur 2018, 64-65 : 138-145.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Peter Josephson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History of Ideas

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 2018, 15 (9): -.

Seasonal allergies have been associated with mental health problems, though the evidence is still emergent, particularly in the United States. We analyzed data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication and the National Latino and Asian American Survey (years 2001⁻2003). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the relations between lifetime allergies and lifetime psychiatric disorders (each disorder in a separate model), adjusting for socio-demographic variables (including region of residence) and tobacco use. Analyses were also stratified to test for effect modification by race and sex. A history of seasonal allergies was associated with greater odds of mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and eating disorders, but not alcohol or substance use disorders, after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics and tobacco use. The associations between seasonal allergies and mood disorders, substance use disorders, and alcohol use disorders were particularly strong for Latino Americans. The association between seasonal allergies and eating disorders was stronger for men than women. Seasonal allergies are a risk factor for psychiatric disorders. Individuals complaining of seasonal allergies should be screened for early signs of mental health problems and referred to specialized services accordingly.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Hans Oh

Andrew Stickley


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

SCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Die SS nach 1945. Göttingen : V&R Unipress, 2018. 395-418.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Steffen Werther

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

Samtidshistoriska institutetSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

Small Business Economics 2018, : -.

This paper explores regional variation in the effects of publicly sponsored R&D grants on SME performance. The results suggest that there is no guarantee that the grants will impact firm growth, either positive or negative. Positive growth effects are most likely to be found for publicly sponsored R&D grants targeting SMEs located in regions abundant with skilled labor, whereas the opposite is found for SMEs located in regions with a limited supply of skilled labor.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

J. Videnord

Patrik Tingvall

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Economics

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Time in the History of Art. New York & Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2018. 1-10.

Art history as we know it is regarded by many actors in the art world as obsolete. Today, it seems contemporaneity rules in a “post-historical” situation, where art history seems deprived of a future. Some two decades or more after the heyday of postmodernism, it is time to reconsider what kinds of historical claims can still be made for the field of art history and visual studies. If the very word “history” is laden with antiquated expectations of “objectivity” as the discipline goes about its customary business of putting objects back into their chronological place, then the concept of temporality opens up fresh approaches to the temporal organization of the discipline. What if visual art is in a position to explain and expand history rather than vice versa? What if the artwork grounds history? What if the work does not necessarily belong to its own time, but was born prematurely or belatedly, disjointed with respect to a chronological axis? Art historical approaches are still possible, indeed needed, but they do look a little different from those to which we have become accustomed.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

K. Moxey

Dan Karlholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Art History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Om anden. Järna : Kosmos Förlag, 2018. 53-67.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Sven-Olov Wallenstein

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Nature Communications 2018, 9 : -.

Habitat loss through land-use change is the most pressing threat to biodiversity worldwide. European semi-natural grasslands have suffered an ongoing decline since the early twentieth century, but we have limited knowledge of how grassland loss has affected biodiversity across large spatial scales. We quantify land-use change over 50-70 years across a 175,000 km(2) super-region in southern Sweden, identifying a widespread loss of open cover and a homogenisation of landscape structure, although these patterns vary considerably depending on the historical composition of the landscape. Analysing species inventories from 46,796 semi-natural grasslands, our results indicate that habitat loss and degradation have resulted in a decline in grassland specialist plant species. Local factors are the best predictors of specialist richness, but the historical landscape predicts present-day richness better than the contemporary landscape. This supports the widespread existence of time-lagged biodiversity responses, indicating that further species losses could occur in the future.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Alistair G. Auffret

Jan Plue

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

This dissertation explores ways in which “queer digital media use” co-produces senses of space, time, and queer being in contemporary Russia. Considering the particular implications of (in)visibility for queer living, and the importance of compartmentalizing conflicting spheres, the study provides a grounded account of queer life lived with and through digital media in a context currently characterized by “anti-gay” sentiments. Empirically, it draws on fieldwork and in-depth interviews with queer male informants in Saint Petersburg from 2013–2015 in accordance with a “non-digital-centric” digital ethnography. Taking a distinct phenomenological perspective, the study asks how digital media is implicated within the informants’ queer orientation towards the world. How does digital media affect perceptions of the here and now, the proximate and the distant, and spaces of belonging? In what way is it entwined with the directions they take and how they perceive of the future? And how do the different mobilities of flesh and code relate to one another? Aiming to answer such questions, the study outlines a “queer digital media phenomenology”, combining Sara Ahmed’s queer phenomenology and Shaun Moores’s media phenomenology. While Ahmed provides a deep understanding of queer habituation, Moores adds a consideration of the multiply positioned digital media user, as a fundamental pre-requisite for contemporary social experience. Rather than echoing commonly accepted ideas of speedup and instantaneousness within digital culture, the results show that digital media is often used among the informants to help produce slowness and to postpone further action. By producing spaces understood as “safe” and private, digital media provides sites where the work of generating a queer orientation can be done, and where the larger geography of everyday living may be negotiated. The study thus explores how the informants travel across multiple sites, particularly articulating the dynamics between online and offline spaces, and the discontinuities of queer digital media use. Challenging the idea of constant connectivity and an online/offline collapse, the dissertation follows recent studies in suggesting that digital media use exposes unorthodox ways of imagining relationality, why we need to critically consider inbuilt normative assumptions about the embodied subjects anticipated to live “seamless medialives”.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Stina Bengtsson

Matilda Tudor

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Baltic Worlds 2018, XI (1): 77-79.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Arche - tidskrift för psykoanalys, humaniora och arkitektur 2018, 62-63 : 150-160.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Oxford Handbook of the History of Phenomenology. : Oxford University Press, 2018. -.

The chapter presents the topic of “historicity” (Geschichtlichkeit) as a core concern for phenomenological thinking in the intersection with hermeneutics. It is first coined as a philosophical term by Dilthey and Yorck von Wartenburg as a way to capture the unique way in which humans exist historically and belong to history. Through their correspondence published posthumously in 1923 it enters the orbit of Heidegger’s existential phenomenology, as he quotes extensively from these letters in Being in Time. For Heidegger, historicity was the key to transforming Husserlian phenomenology into hermeneutical ontology. In his reappraisal of hermeneutic thinking, Gadamer also locates historicity at the center of his magnum opus Truth and Method. The chapter also shows how Husserl was a thinker of historicity. This is brought out in particular in Derrida’s early interpretations of Husserl, where the deconstructive approach emerges literally from the problem of the historicity of ideal objects.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Transnationalising Reproduction. London : Routledge, 2018. 122-138.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Transnationalising Reproduction. London : Routledge, 2018. 11-33.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Transnationalising Reproduction. London : Routledge, 2018. 11-33.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Róisín Ryan-Flood

Jenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

London : Routledge, 2018.

Third party conception is a growing phenomenon and provokes a burgeoning range of ethical, legal and social questions. What are the rights of donors, recipients and donor conceived children? How are these reproductive technologies regulated? How is kinship understood within these new family forms?Written by specialists from three different continents, Transnationalising Reproduction examines a broad range of issues concerning kinship and identity, citizenship and regulation, and global markets of reproductive labour; including gamete donation and gestational surrogacy. Indeed, this book seeks to highlight how reproductive technologies not only makes possible new forms of kinship and family formations, but also how these give rise to new, ethical, political and legal dilemmas about parenthood as well as new modes of discrimination and a re-distribution of medical risks. It also thoroughly investigates the ways in which a commodification of reproductive tissue and labour affects the practices, representations and gendered self-understandings of gamete donors, fertility patients and intended parents in different parts of the world.With a broad geographical scope, Transnationalising Reproduction offers new empirical and theoretical perspectives on third-party conception and demonstrates the need for more transnational approaches to third-party reproduction. This volume will appeal to postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers interested in fields such as Gender Studies, Health Care Sciences, Reproductive Technology and Medical Sociology.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Róisín Ryan-Flood

Jenny Gunnarsson Payne

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Turismhistoria i Norden. Uppsala : Kungliga Gustav Adolfs Akademien, 2018. 283-294.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Christian Widholm

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Tourism Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Religion 2018, 1 (1): 36-38.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Simon Sorgenfrei

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Comparative Religion

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Body, Migration, Re/constructive Surgeries. London : Routledge, 2018. -.

This chapter explores what it means to negotiate embodied ‘gendersex’ as part of engaging with transmedicine. It draws in the main on two trans men’s narratives about their trajectories to undertake gender-affirming surgery, with one man travelling from Denmark to Serbia and the other shifting from publicly funded trans-specific healthcare to a private hospital within Serbia. I use the concepts of navigation and negotiation to move beyond theoretical discussions about whether medical transition is transgressive or compliant, and look instead at individualized orientations regarding surgical interventions. I utilize a framework of biomedicalization to consider how these processes involve negotiating surgeries and navigating in borderlands between different (public and private) healthcare systems, and across international borders, as well as in borderlands between the capitalist logics of body modification as a commodified good, the logics of medical transition as validated within a framework of pathologization, and emerging logics of self-determination. The chapter offers insights into contemporary sites where the organization of transmedicine is changing, and where knowledge about how to chart a course through medical transition is largely created in trans people’s multi-sited networks online and offline.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Iwo Nord

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Educare - Vetenskapliga skrifter 2018, : 42-.

Earlier interview studies of electric guitar playing girls in upper secondary schools, shows clearly that taken for granted knowledge values are connected to specific genres or styles, and to specific actions and behaviours related to these style. It is also obvious that the interviewed students, not least depending on sex, relate differently to these values. One statement based on the results of the interview studies with five electric guitar playing girls is that the role of the teacher becomes important when it comes to contribute to equal teaching and learning of music. The question is what the teacher needs to know and handle. In the article a pentagon model for responsive teaching is mirrored towards the girls’ experiences of ensemble education, aiming to make clear and discuss possibilities for equal teaching and learning. The connection to the special number of EDUCARE is not least the risk that arts values can conserve traditional gender roles in music educational settings.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Ferm Almqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

Studies in the Educational Sciences

Per Musi 2018, : 19-.

The starting point for the study presented in this article is constituted by experiences of using Simone de Beauvoir’s philosophy aiming to describe and understand the becoming of musical women in Swedish schools. Earlier research conducted outside the area of music shows that Beauvoir’s theories can help to explain – and provide means of change for – situations where there is a risk that traditional gender roles will be conserved. A majority of gender studies in the field of music education are based on the performativity theory of Judith Butler. In comparison, de Beauvoir states that repetitions and habits are stratified in the body as experiences, and that human beings are able to make choices in a situation. The aim of the study is to explore how caring is nurtured among girls in Swedish music educational settings. Material generated through two phenomenological studies conducted within specialist music programs in lower respectively higher secondary education in Sweden, constituted the empirical base for conducting re-analysis. This re-analysis followed a hermeneutical phenomenological analytical model. Examples of how caring seemed to be nurtured among girls in music education appeared at different levels and in different situations. It concerns actions made by the girls aiming to make the social and musical setting function in agreed upon “good” ways, namely in the form of taking initiatives, filling “gaps”, and being flexible, andbecoming (aware) musical women. Finally we reflect upon causes and changes in relation to actions that seem to establish and maintain female students as immanent, and non-able to run their own projects, to speak with de Beauvoir. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Cecilia Ferm Almqvist

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Education

Research area for doctoral studies

Studies in the Educational Sciences

Baltic Worlds 2018, XI (2-3): 121-121.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Lundén

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal of Business Research 2018, 93 : 12-22.

Task equivocality could be a key impediment in offshore collaboration projects. Process modularity, or the extent to which offshore collaboration tasks can be decoupled and re-sequenced with little loss of functionality in offshore collaboration, could help lower task equivocality. Process modularity could be further complemented by knowledge conversion cycles and offshoring collaboration competence to further lower task equivocality. We use data from 86 offshore research and development collaboration projects between two strategic business units of a large European firm and their partner firms in India. The results show that process modularity was not associated with task equivocality. However, with increasing process modularity, higher levels of knowledge conversion cycles or offshore collaboration competence were negatively associated with task equivocality. These preliminary findings extend our knowledge of task equivocality in the context of offshore collaboration projects.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Pankaj C. Patel

Pejvak Oghazi

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift 2018, 25 (1): 87-89.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Per Carlson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Social Work

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

In: Proceedings of Bridges 2018 on Mathematics, Art, Music, Architecture, Education, Culture. Phoenix, Arizona : .

This paper discusses the nature of art activity, such as dance, in teaching and learning subject matter, such as math, querying what is left from the artistic when art is put to serve a cause, such as education. Does any partner, dance, math or education gain or give up more in the triangular affair?

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Paul Moerman

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

Teacher Education

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Annat forskningsområde

PLoS ONE 2018, 13 (8): 1-21.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Christopher Kullenberg

Gustav Westberg

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Globalizations 2018, : -.

This paper argues that past research has overlooked how the way problems and solutions are framed contribute to a prevailing gap in the global governance of climate and energy. Empirically, this paper investigates the frames of energy and climate change as expressed in key documents from the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and International Energy Agency (IEA). Partly in contrast to past research, this paper finds (1) that there is a growing similarity in how the IPCC and IEA frame climate and energy; (2) that the IEA has gone from ignoring to acknowledging climate change and the transformation to a low-carbon energy system; and (3) that there is a prevailing difference in emphasis, whereas the IPCC only marginally discuss energy, while the IEA is still mainly talking about energy needs and fossil fuels even if climate change and renewables have entered their agenda.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gunilla Reischl

Johan Eriksson

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Political Science

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences 2018, : 1-8.

AimsDeath ideation (thinking about/wishing for one's own death, thinking that one would be better off dead) is linked to an increased mortality risk. However, comparatively little is known about more general thoughts of death (GTOD) where no wish to die or life value is expressed. This study examined whether GTOD predicted mortality in a community-based cohort of older adults.METHODS: Data came from the Komo-Ise cohort study in Gunma prefecture, Japan. The analytic sample comprised 8208 individuals (average age 61.3 (range 47-77)) who were asked in wave 2 of the study in 2000 if they had 'Thought about death more than usual, either your own, someone else's or death in general?' in the past 2 weeks. Death data were obtained from the municipal resident registration file. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine associations.RESULTS: During the follow-up period (2000-2008), there were 672 deaths. In a model adjusted for baseline covariates, GTOD were significantly associated with all-cause mortality (hazards ratio 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.20-2.29). Stratified analyses showed an association between GTOD and mortality in men, older subjects (⩾70 years), married individuals and those with higher social support.CONCLUSIONS: GTOD are associated with an increased mortality risk among older citizens in Japan. Research is now needed to determine the factors underlying this association and assess the clinical relevance of screening for GTOD in older individuals.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

C F S Ng

Andrew Stickley


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

SCOHOSTSchool of Social Sciences

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

SAGE Open 2018, 8 (2): -.

The link between new venture survival and the presence of founding teams is investigated, in particular the effect of the gender composition of teams. Furthermore, we study venture survival, gender, and institutional change. A unique longitudinal database is employed, covering a large number of Swedish ventures established during 6 specific years, 1930-2005. These data capture the initial gender diversity of start-ups. The contextualization of entrepreneurship involves situational and temporal boundaries, and we elaborate on contextual factors at different levels of analysis. Our results show that ventures founded by teams have a higher probability of surviving, but show no overall team gender homogeneity/heterogeneity effect. However, we find some support for the fact that ventures founded by all-female teams have lower survival chances. Nevertheless, the clearest negative effect is found for female solo start-ups. Furthermore, our results support the fact that institutional transformation may gradually have increased the likelihood of ventures founded by females to survive. 

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Marcus BoxTommy Larsson Segerlind

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

ENTER forumSchool of Social Sciences
Business Administration

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Sats 2018, 19 (1): 69-87.

This article explores the connections between Nietzsche's Also Sprach Zarathustra and Tove Jansson and the world of the Moomins. It begins with a short summary of the impact of Nietzsche in the Nordic countries and of his most important book, focusing on passages that are of particular relevance for the analyses that follow. It then proceeds to explore its meaning and significance for Jansson in three sections. The first concerns Atos Wirtanen, the writer and politician with whom she lived for ten years, and who encouraged her to publish her first book, while he himself was completing a book on Nietzsche. In the second section, the article analyzes an early semi-autobiographical literary experiment from the Jansson family archive that displays her as a passionate reader of Nietzsche long before her meeting with Wirtanen. In the third and last section, the framework of the Zarathustra narrative is used to interpret some of the figures and scenes from the Moomin books.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Hans Ruin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Functional Ecology 2018, 32 (8): 2095-2106.

Polyploidy is associated with a plethora of phenotypic and genetic changes yielding transformative effects on species' life-history and ecology. These biological attributes can contribute to the success of species on ecological timescales, as observed in the invasion success or rapid environmental and climatic adaptation of polyploids. However, to date there has been a distinct lack of empirical evidence linking species' local extinction risk, species distributions and community structure in fragmented landscapes with interspecific variation in ploidy. We aimed to investigate the relationship between levels of habitat fragmentation and patterns in both diversity and the frequency of species with different ploidy levels. We included additional persistence- and dispersal related life-history traits, to establish the relative importance of ploidy in determining species richness and frequencies following habitat fragmentation. We therefore collected plant community presence-absence data and landscape data from grassland fragments from south-central Sweden. Community-level analysis uncovered that interspecific variation in ploidy proved the strongest predictor of plant community species richness and turn-over across grassland fragments. Local extinction risk decreased as ploidy increased, with diploids most prone to local extinction. In the species-level analysis, ploidy outweighed the combined explanatory power of commonly used life-history traits such as clonality, dispersal mechanism and mating system; key predictors of plant species distributions across fragmented landscapes. Ploidy appears to capture parallel variation in a series of advantageous genetic and life-history mechanisms which operate on ecological timescales, emerging as the strongest predictor of local extinction risk even after accounting for variation in other crucial life-history traits. Our results therefore highlight the importance of genomic traits such as ploidy and total chromosome number as valuable factors explaining and predicting local extinction risk in fragmented landscapes. A plain language summary is available for this article.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

A. Kimberley

Jan Plue

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies
Environmental Science

Research area for doctoral studies

-

European Urban and Regional Studies 2018, 25 (3): 284-299.

This paper examines recent migration from three little-studied European Union (EU) countries, the Baltic states, focusing on early-career graduates who move to London. It looks at how these young migrants explain the reasons for their move, their work and living experiences in London, and their plans for the future, based on 78 interviews with individual migrants. A key objective of this paper is to rejuvenate the core-periphery structural framework through the theoretical lens of London as an escalator' region for career development. We add a necessary nuance on how the time dimension is crucial in understanding how an escalator region functions - both in terms of macro-events such as EU enlargement or economic crisis, and for life-course events such as career advancement or family formation. Our findings indicate that these educated young adults from the EU's north-eastern periphery migrate for a combination of economic, career, lifestyle and personal-development reasons. They are ambivalent about their futures and when, and whether, they will return-migrate.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Russell King

Maarja Saar

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Ethnology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Religious Studies Review 2018, 44 (2): 237-237.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Per Faxneld

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies
Comparative Religion

Research area for doctoral studies

-

The European Journal of Women's Studies 2018, 25 (3): 269-277.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Jenny SundénUlrika Dahl

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Gender Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Culture, Theory and Critique 2018, 59 (3): 281-298.

When cynical distance and ironic posturing have become the prevalent means of relating to public life, political humour is no longer considered subversive. It has been argued that both in Russia and the United States, ideology has co-opted satire, meaning that citizens can consume outrage passively through various satirical media products, thereby displacing outrage and abstaining from more active forms of resistance. This articles explores the twenty-first century potential of irony and cynicism to disrupt and subvert through parody, be it in the form of political satire or ironic protest, examining how similar paradigms are expressed across different geographical contexts.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Northern Lights 2018, 16 (1): 3-21.

Following the spread of digital media, the interdisciplinary field of surveillance studies has gained prominence, engaging scholars from the humanities and the social sciences alike. This introductory article aims to map out the main terrain of surveillance through, by and in the media. First, we discuss the phenomenon of, and the scholarly work on, surveillance through and by media, taking into consideration both state and corporate surveillance and how these activities have grown with the new digital and personal media of today. We then discuss surveillance as the phenomenon is represented in the media and how representations relate to surveillance practices. We conclude by presenting the articles of this special issue.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

A. Jerslev

Göran Bolin

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations 2018, : -.

Nonprofit organizations in Russia are introducing for-profit activities as a means of gaining autonomy from external donors, and as instruments of strategic planning and sustainable development. This study focuses on organizations that work with welfare provision and explores how they reconcile entrepreneurial activities with their social mission. More specifically, we interrogate how two institutional logics, business and nonprofit, are defined and reconciled in organizational identities, structures and hierarchies. Socially oriented nonprofits define their mission through service to beneficiaries, through personal and professional dedication to beneficiaries’ well-being, and through making an impact on public policies and the society at large. They mimic a business approach in strategic planning and meticulous reporting, but subordinate profit-seeking to social mission by integrating entrepreneurial activities into already existing organizational structures, or by separating them into independent entities.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

A. Moskvina

Zhanna Kravchenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Medien & Kommunikationswissenschaft 2018, 66 (3): 338-339.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Anne Kaun

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: . : .

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Marmefelt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Economics

Research area for doctoral studies

-

London & New York : Routledge, 2018.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Thomas Marmefelt

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Economics

Research area for doctoral studies

Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society

Sociologisk forskning 2018, 55 (2-3): 317-339.

Ethnic hierarchies and (non)representation. Party candidates with migration background in the general election of 2014.This paper analyses the extent to which individuals with migration background were appointed and elected into different levels of public decision-making bodies in the latest Swedish general election (2014). Individuals of ”migration background” refers in this study to those born abroad or born in Sweden with two foreign-born parents. Data for this study is taken from Statistics Sweden’s register of candidates elected in municipal, county and national parliamentary elections in 2014, supplemented by information from other Statistics Sweden’s registers. The results demonstrate that: (a) individuals with a migration background are severely underrepresented in the Swedish decision-making bodies; (b) even in cases when individuals with a migration background are nominated on the party lists, they have less of a chance of being elected compared to native candidates. (c) The dominant ”resource theory” cannot explain the underrepresentation of the stigmatized migrant groups and their descendants, and finally; (d) the results indicate some support to the hypothesis about the importance of access to social networks in order to be nominated and elected.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Alireza Behtoui

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Sociologisk forskning 2018, 55 (2-3): 365-387.

From chatter to organized networks. How think tanks work to enrol othersThink tanks, both inside and outside the Swedish context, appear as something of a conundrum. Definitions and conceptual understandings of what think tanks actually do have not been adequately developed. One of the most urgent and unanswered questions regards how we understand the ability of think tanks to get other actors in the political landscape to use their ideas? Drawing on insights from 13 think thanks in Stockholm, the intention of this paper is to provide an empirically based and theoretically informed answer to this question. The results show that the activities colloquially termed ”networking” and ”agenda setting”, can be understood from an organisational perspective. These activities come across as intangible with uncertain outcomes but cannot be seen as random attempts to bridge think tankers and policy actors, but as decided actions designed to make other actors use their ideas in the future. At the same time, the organized relationships to other actors are ambiguous, as too close relationships may risk the think tank’s appearance of independency.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Adrienne Sörbom

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Sociologisk forskning 2018, 55 (2-3): 139-154.

The political landscape in Sweden has undergone considerable changes in recent decades The number of political parties in the Swedish parliament has increased from five to eight, and the socio-economic issues of the traditional political right–left scale has been challenged by socio-cultural issues relating to lifestyle and identity. Notably, the notion of Swedish exceptionalism and the particularities of its welfare state is lingering despite findings pointing in the opposite direction e.g. with the increased electoral support for the radical right, and its ethno-nationalist and anti-immigrant rhetoric. The corporatist model has been challenged by new forms of political authority, participation and representation. New political actors, such as social movements and civil society actors, think tanks and policy professionals, are becoming increasingly engaged in political processes. The long-term trend suggests that traditionally marginalised groups, such as the young, women and groups of migrant background, are represented in decision-making forums to a higher degree than before. Yet, current conditions need further analysis. In this article, we provide a background to Sociologisk Forskning’s special issue on the political landscape of the parliamentary election in 2018.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gabriella Elgenius

Magnus Wennerhag

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Sociologisk forskning 2018, 55 (2-3): 121-138.

Change and continuity in the political landscape. Politico-sociological perspectives on the general election in Sweden 2018The political landscape in Sweden has undergone considerable changes in recent decades. The number of political parties in the Swedish parliament has increased from five to eight, and the socio-economic issues of the traditional political right–left scale has been challenged by socio-cultural issues relating to lifestyle and identity. Notably, the radical right has had significant electoral success in Sweden based on an ethno-nationalist and anti-immigrant rhetoric. The corporatist model has increasingly been challenged by new forms of political authority, participation and representation. Yet, new political actors such as social movements and civil society actors, think tanks and policy professionals, are becoming increasingly engaged in the political processes. Moreover, traditionally marginalised groups including the young, women and individuals of migrant background are represented to a higher degree in political bodies than before. In this article, we introduce the articles of Sociologisk Forskning’s special issue on the Swedish political landscape and give an overview of the main developments of politics and society in the country.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Gabriella Elgenius

Magnus Wennerhag

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2018

School/Centre

School of Social Sciences
Sociology

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Year of publication

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe