About us / Staff

Irina Sandomirskaja

Contact information

Irina Sandomirskaja
Professor
Alfred Nobels allé 7
Södertörns Högskola
Flemingsberg
Phone: +46 8 608 4457
Fax: +46 8 608 4170
MA 792 Moas Båge
Publications

In: The End of the World. London : Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017. 235-256.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Slavic and East European Journal 2017, 61 (2): 278-298.

This essay is an attempt to interpret Mikhail Bakhtin’s working notes in a new way, by reading them as instances of fragmented writing produced in exile during the war. To capture the specific way Bakhtin’s thinking reveals itself in a difficult relationship with writing, I read these pieces through the prism of critical categories suggested by Maurice Blanchot in his book The Writing of the Disaster (1980). By means of comparative reading of these two quite disparate authors, I hope to demonstrate that the very fragmentariness of Bakhtin’s writing, a well as its unfinished and ”un-worked” character, opens it up for critical reflection.  The fragments in question should be read as exilic theory rather than merely biographic data or preliminary materials that suffer, not surprisingly, from intellectual and writerly incompleteness. This essay also discusses ambiguities in Bakhtin the asyndetic writer (a stylistic trait especially difficult to solve in translation) as methodologically central for an understanding of his philosophy of history and language.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Revolution och existens. Stockholm : Ersatz, 2017. 133-156.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2017

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature 2017, 36 (1): 233-235.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Ad Marciam. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2017. 199-209.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2017

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Historiens hemvist. Göteborg : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 177-192.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Historical Studies

In: Transgressive Women in Modern Russian and East European Cultures. New York : Routledge, 2016. 192-208.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

N. Azhgikhina

Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Historiens hemvist II. : Makadam Förlag, 2016. 177-192.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

Apparatus 2016, 2-3 : -.

In his Theresienstadt 1941/1945, Hans Günther Adler describes episodes of film making in Theresienstadt giving most attention to the history of the production of the 1944 film. He sums up the episode calling its purpose and organisation by the SS "the gruesome carnival". Interesting enough, while giving a whole chapter in the book to a description of Theresienstadt's cultural life, Adler never mentions the film among other examples of cultural expression but inserts its description into Theresienstadt's administrative chronicle. The film receives a place for itself within the context of the bureaucratic transformations of Theresienstadt from a closed camp into a "ghetto" and finally into a purely decorative "Jewish settlement". This latter transformation Adler describes as part of the cynical campaign of "Verschönerung" of Theresienstadt, an attempt of the SS and the administration to make it presentable to international observers. Adler describes the cruel film carneval as the campaign's piece de resistance and thus resolutely excludes the film from the domain of cultural phenomena as if rejecting any possibility for its redemption. Instead, he inscribes the project into the administrative logic of extermination, filmmaking becoming an additional – inventive in its cruelty and effective – technique of moral extermination in the world of "der verwaltete Mensch". In this article, I emphasize Adler's view of the moving image as a predominantly administrative means, and not a medium of cultural expression. This view becomes quite challenging and complex if Adler's witness account of the film project in Theresienstadt is read together with his reflection on mechanically reproducible, and especially moving, images in Adler's fiction. I will focus on Adler's treatment of the image and image technology in his novels Panorama and Eine Reise / The Journey, with a special attention to the way he considers the relation between the apparatus, memory, and witnessing.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Slavic Review 2016, 75 (3): 787-788.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Ab Imperio 2015, 2015 (2): 339-362.

When discussing Bolshevik cultural politics, both scholars and the public today emphasize what the Bolsheviks destroyed. In this essay, however, the focus is on what they “preserved,” and especially how they preserved it, to what purpose, and with what consequences. The article reconstructs the ideology and practices of cultural heritage in Soviet Russia from the vantage point of Bolshevik policies in reuses of the past. As an example, in reading the writing of the authority in Soviet cultural heritage industry, Igor Grabar, the author reconstructs the process of aestheticization, commodification, and internationalization of the Russian Orthodox icon.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Dis-orientations. London : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015. 187-218.

A comparative reading of Walter Benjamin's linguistic theology and Sören Kirkegaard's theory of the revolutionary age.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: The vernaculars of Communism. London : Routledge, 2015. 63-88.

Aesopian language (or Aesopian speech) is an important component of Soviet language culture, a cultureof expression under surveillance and censorhip that invented various modes of the  circumlocution and euphemization of politically sensitive topics. In this chapter, I am illustrating some of the innumerable ways of organizing communcation under the sign of (sometimes imagined) prosecution. I am describing various practices of Aesopian circumlocution and summarizing theoretical work in Soviet literary history that addressed this peculiar phenomenon in Russian and Soviet literary tradition. I am also discussing the aesthetics and politics of Aesopian language and its role as a means of expressing political dissent as this was seen by its practitioners inside the USSR and by the theorists who worked with the matters of language and power in the West.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2015

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Misha Pedan. Stockholm : Khimaira förlag, 2013. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Glänta 2013, 2-3 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2013, 6 (1): 56-.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Yulia GradskovaIrina SandomirskajaNadezda Petrusenko

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2013

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Historical and Contemporary Studies
History

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Moskva : Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 2013.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2013

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

An allegory of the omnipotent state, the Leviathan occurs in Lidia Ginzburg’s notes from 1943-44 and in the context of her reflections on the experiences of surviving in, and living on after, the unprecedented human catastrophe of the siege of Leningrad. Ginzburg describes her time as the “era of great experiences and tests” which started in 1914: the era of world wars with their “maximum non-freedom” and the “absolute non-freedoms” imposed by the all-powerful state, the Leviathan. The siege of Leningrad is not an exception from such a history, but a culmination of the “non-freedoms” of Soviet and, more broadly, European modernity of the twentieth century. All of these events/experiences produced a generation that “became history’s experimental material. And history burned it and disemboweled it and minced it into a bloody mess.” In the siege of Leningrad, various dimensions of “non-freedom”— total mobilization and total war, state terror, and mass death – culminate, converge, and confirm one another.  In the struggle for survival amidst destruction, repression, and starvation, Ginzburg tries to understand the Leviathan, the omnipotent state that sanctions and orchestrates the massive obliteration of life. The new Leviathan emerges as a complex aggregate of different power technologies involving various aspects of life and, hence, producing different overlapping regimes of “non-freedoms.”According to Ginzburg, the subject is involved in the workings of the Leviathan in many ways. Moreover, as exemplified by the experience of the civilian in the siege, the individual depends on the Leviathan for elementary survival. This political and biopolitical complexity makes Ginzburg’s critique more challenging than the trivial understanding of “non-freedom” as a mere deprivation of rights. Matters of life and death in the siege, as Ginzburg’s witness account shows, are deeply politicized, and the power to administer and distribute life and death constitute the foundation of the New Leviathan’s omnipotence. The New Leviathan’s three vectors of power – repression, discipline, and biopower — each in their own way contribute to the destruction of the human and usher a new, post-human historical subject summed up in the figure of distrofik (a patient of starvation disease in the terminal stage) overpowered by the total indifference between life and death, between living and surviving. I propose to look at the strategies and politics involved in such a subjectivity, with a special emphasis on the “choreography” of besiegement: its spatio-temporal structure, its corporeality, and strategies of surviving its post-human condition, as well as the dilemmas of living on “ever after”.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Lydia Ginzburg's Alternative Literary Identities. Oxford [u.a.] : Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012. 193-234.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Neprikosnovennyj zapas 2012, 82 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie 2012, 117 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Power and Legitimacy. London : Routledge, 2012. 188-198.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Embracing Arms Cultural Representation of Slavic and Balkan Women in War. Budapest : Central European University Press, 2012. 131-151.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2012

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Rethinking Time. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2011. 247-255.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Russia reader. Durham : Duke University Press, 2010. 735-742.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: En annan humaniora - en annan tid = Another humanities - another time. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2010. 23-31.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education
Philosophy

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Slavic Review 2010, 69 (2): 306-326.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2010

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Studies in East European thought 2008, 60 (4): 321-337.

The article deals with surdotiflopedagogika, a doctrine of special education for deaf-blind-mute children as it was developed in the USSR in the 1920s and 1930s. In the spirit of social constructivism of the early Stalinist society, surdotiflopedagogika presents itself as a technology for the manufacture of socially useful human beings out of handicapped children with sight and hearing impairments, "half-animals, half-plants". Surdotiflopedagogika's institutionalization and rationale as these were evolving under the special patronage of Maxim Gorkij are analysed. Its experimental aspect is also discussed. Exploring and implementing the most advanced ideas in the technology of communication, surdotiflopedagogika sought to compensate for the loss of speech, hearing, and sight by supplying the child with mechanical and human prostheses, including other people (assistants), technical devices, techniques of the body, and multiple communication codes to be translated from one into another. In the case of Soviet deaf-blind education, the Soviet subject appears as a technologically enhanced, collectively shared, and extended body in a permanent process of translation, internal as well as external. Technologies of language and acculturation that are of particular interest. Surdotiflopedagogika's method as it appears in the theoretical writing of Ivan Afanasjevic Sokoljanskij (1889-1960), the teacher of the legendary deaf-blind author and educator Ol'ga Ivanovna Skorokhodova (19147-1982) are given particular attention

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema 2008, 2 (1): 63-83.

This article attempts to interpret Kira Muratova's Asthenic Syndrome (1989) from the point of view of the director's work with sound. I suggest that in composing the sound for the film, Muratova seeks to dissect the filmic convention that treats sound merely as an additional element, which is supposed to support the illusionism of the realistic visual image by complementing it with the illusion of an accompanying realistic audio image. In order to subvert this false motivation of sound by visuality, to highlight sound as an independent agent in the construction of meaning, and to emphasize the explosive critical potential of film sound, Muratova employs techniques of sound performance art and sound installation. She uses the medium of sound to make visible those politics of speaking and hearing that constitute the USSR in crisis, a society that imagines itself through audio metaphors: glasnost, related to the Russian word golos (voice), and perestroika, related to the Russian term nastroika, tuning (of a musical instrument or an acoustic device). As a result, heteroglossy receives a literal implementation in the spoken word, which is acutely and irreparably out of tune, alienated from itself and polytonal in a freakish, morbid and perversely pleasurable way. These effects are achieved through the use of non-professional actors, the use of voices with substandard articulation, the emphasis on hybrid or dialectal prosody and phonation, amateur declamations and recitals and other manipulations of the Soviet norms of high diction. I also explore the genealogy of Muratova's technology in terms of the principles of manipulating the viewer's sensitivity and perception as invented by the Soviet film avant-garde (Eisenstein and Vertov) and contemporary critical theory (Benjamin and Adorno). I thus understand Asthenic Syndrome not only as political critique, but also as a meta-filmic analysis, an allegory of mourning and a diagnosis of asthenia in both film as technology and in the (collective perception of the) USSR as the symbolic product of film technologies

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: The Poetics of Memory in Post-Totalitarian Narration. Lund : Center for European Studies, 2008. 81-94.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Russia and its Other(s) on Film. London : Palgrave, 2008. 130-147.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: From Orientalism to Postcoloniality. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2008. 8-31.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2008

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Glänta 2007, 1 : 3-17.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2007

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Landslide of the Norm. Bergen : Dept. of Russian Studies, 2006. 263-291.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Novoe LiteraturnoeObozrenie 2006, 79 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Mark Lipovetskii

Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2006

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Glänta 2005, 3 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2005

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Telling Forms. Stockholm : Almqvist & Wiksell International, 2004. 340-356.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2004

School/Centre

School of Culture and Education

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: In Search of an Order. Huddinge : Södertörn University, 2004. 7-20.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2004

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: In search of an order. Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2004. 155-172.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2004

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Huddinge : Södertörns högskola, 2004.

The essays presented in this book cover that age of European rationality during which, by fits and starts, between intermittent wars and armistices, the gradual move took place from the epoch of the Baroque to Classicism and then to the age of Romaticism. During the period, one of the empires evolves into a European superpower, reaches its apogee and slowly declines; in the meantime, its counterpart on the other shore closely watches and emulates its neighbour/enemy/big brother and gradually masters the art of being an empire. We leave the scene of the narrative delineated in this volume at the turning point when the impoverished Sweden sets out on the path towards European nation statehood, leaving the newly magnificent Russia to shine on land and sea in its stubborn pursuit on unrestricted dominion. The stage of this historical drama is not only populated by armies and navies, but also enlivened by an incessant flow of travelers traversing the expanses of the other, in both directions and beyond each other's confines, in search of each other's secrets, the keys to the other's (and consequently one's own) symbolic constitution.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Ulla Birgegård


Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2004

School/Centre

CBEES

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Wiener Slawistischer Almanach. Wien : Institut für Slavische Philologie, Universität München, 2002. 133-151.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2002

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Europa und die Grenzen im Kopf. Klagenfurt : Wieser-Verlag, 2002. 395-415.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2002

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Kultur, Sprache, Ökonomie. Wien : Ges. zur Förderung Slawistischer Studien, 2001. 399-412.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2001

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Wien : Institut für Slavische Philologie, Universität München, 2001.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2001

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Podium: Literaturzeitschrift 2000, 113/114 : -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2000

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Moderna tider 2000, 121 (November): 54-57.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2000

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Through a glass darkly. Lund : Department of Slavonic studies, 1999. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
1999

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Soviet Civilization Between Past and Present. Odense : Odense Univ. Press, 1998. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
1998

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

In: Reciprocal images. Oslo : Scandinavian University Press, 1997. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
1997

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Moskva : Russkoe fenomenologicheskoe obshchestvo: Gnozis, 1996.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Natalia Kozlova

Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
1996

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

Critical and Cultural Theory

In: Intelligentsia in the interim. Lund : Slaviska inst., univ., 1995. -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
1995

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Heresies: a feminist publication on art and politics 1992, 7 (26): -.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
1992

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

New York : Heresies Collective, 1992.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

Alia Efimova

Irina Sandomirskaja

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
1992

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-