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Maria Brock

Maria Brock

PhD

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

School of Historical and Contemporary Studies

Contact information

Maria Brock
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Alfred Nobels allé 7
Södertörns Högskola
Flemingsberg
Phone: +46 8 608 5237
Publications

Baltic Worlds 2018, XI (1): 77-79.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Culture, Theory and Critique 2018, 59 (3): 281-298.

When cynical distance and ironic posturing have become the prevalent means of relating to public life, political humour is no longer considered subversive. It has been argued that both in Russia and the United States, ideology has co-opted satire, meaning that citizens can consume outrage passively through various satirical media products, thereby displacing outrage and abstaining from more active forms of resistance. This articles explores the twenty-first century potential of irony and cynicism to disrupt and subvert through parody, be it in the form of political satire or ironic protest, examining how similar paradigms are expressed across different geographical contexts.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2018

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Baltic Worlds 2016, IX (4): 83-87.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Imprópia 2016, 5 : 15-23.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

Yes
2016

School/Centre

CBEESSchool of Culture and Education
Media and Communication Studies

Research area for doctoral studies

-

Social & Personality Psychology Compass 2016, 10 (3): 125-135.

This article represents a critical overview of strategies to examine subjectivity in discourse, highlighting a series of methodological approaches, which seek to manage the tension between discourse studies' focus on social and cultural structures, and psychoanalysis' interest in unconscious motivations. One aim is to trouble the supposed opposition between discourse analysis and the psychosocial approach and to regard the latter as a possible extension of insights established by the former. It is argued here that psychosocial readings in general, and Lacanian approaches more specifically, offer a cautious, nuanced way of introducing psychoanalytic ideas into the analysis of texts. The first part of this article offers examples of discourse analytic approaches, which have explicitly sought to incorporate psychoanalytic notions, followed by a discussion of Lacanian discourse analysis - a method shaped directly by this psychoanalytic school's concern with language. The article concludes with a series of methodological injunctions for conducting a psychosocial form of textual analysis.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Subjectivity 2016, 9 (2): 126-144.

Russian reactions to Pussy Riot’s performance in Moscow’s Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in 2012 indicated that a collective nerve had been hit. This article seeks to explain the surge of public outrage following Pussy Riot’s ‘punk prayer’ through a psychosocial analysis of Russian media debates surrounding the case. By focusing on the negative responses, the following discussion investigates what such a ‘resistance to resistance’ might signify, and how it can point to latent forms of identification. It examines the public’s fixation with the group’s name, as well as the prevalence of fantasmatic enactments of violence in media discussions. Results suggest that in their rejection of the group’s performance, participants in the debate found ways of both shifting the threat Pussy Riot represents, and of once again ‘enjoying the nation’.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2016

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Cold War History 2014, 14 (2): 289-291.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2014

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal for the Psychoanalysis of Culture & Society 2012, 17 (1): 102-104.

Reviews the book, Lacanian Ethics and the Assumption of Subjectivity by Calum Neill (2011). This book aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the French psychoanalyst’s ideas on subjectivity and ethics to academics and students at the postgraduate level. It represents a useful starting point for an exploration of the central Lacanian notion of the split subject, along with some related ideas such as fantasy, desire and the drive. The author is consistently thorough in his interpretations, and in his clear style he follows every argument through to its conclusion. The author is consistently thorough in his interpretations, and in his clear style he follows every argument through to its conclusion. It could be said that, while this book is largely about impossibilities, it is by no means an impossible book. The author's erudition and rigor make it a brilliant evocation of both Lacanian and traditional ethical thought. Whether the book’s conclusion proves to be satisfactory to readers depends largely on their interest in, and commitment to, Lacanian theory.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Peace and Conflict 2012, 18 (3): 318-328.

Both nostalgia and melancholia have been portrayed as psychological inabilities or refusals to mourn, coming to denote a common failure to having adapted to situations of social and political change. Both concepts have been used to either condemn the conditions they diagnose, or, alternatively, to hail them for their emancipatory potential. In this regard, both nostalgia and melancholia have been used effectively, separately and alongside one another, as instruments for political critique. However, with this mutual opposition to mourning, melancholia and nostalgia have also been used in ways that make them almost interchangeable. In the absence of a detailed and direct comparison of these two concepts, this article explores the differences and overlaps between melancholia and nostalgia, as well as the different kinds of analyses of posttransition societies they enable. This is achieved through the juxtaposition of a particular regularity in post-apartheid South African popular culture, Afrikaner self-parody, which is characterized as melancholic, with what has frequently been called Ostalgie, nostalgia for the former German Democratic Republic.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject

R. Truscott

Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2012

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Journal for the Psychoanalysis of Culture & Society 2011, 16 (1): 107-109.

Reviews the book, Psychoanalysis outside the clinic: Interventions in pychosocial studies by Stephen Frosh (2011). Through a detailed exposition of existing scholarly endeavors, the book illustrates how these concepts can be applied to issues of a transindividual nature. At the same time, the book tries to rein in those enthusiasts who believe that psychoanalytic knowledge, with its emphasis on affect and the unconscious, holds the missing elements to a Grand Theory of the Social. One way of reading this book is therefore as a review of previous efforts to transcend the original analyst-analysand dyad. Each chapter looks at a different area and sub discipline that has experienced an influx of psychoanalytic ideas, including literary studies, social psychology and ethics. The author always remains critical of the dogmatic tendencies of psychoanalytic thinking, which at times appears to want to install its mode of viewing the social world as a new 'Master Discourse'. This development effects a domestication of its ideas, a 'blunting of the subversive edge of psychoanalysis'. This book is not likely to convert those sceptical of the discipline's tenets; and, though it might disappoint those searching for an impassioned argument for the explanatory potency of psychoanalysis, it nevertheless provides an indispensable guide to existing interdisciplinary efforts.

AuthorPublishing yearSubject
Maria Brock

Research linked to the Baltic region and Eastern Europe

No
2011

School/Centre

-

-


Research area for doctoral studies

-

Coauthor, Södertörn University

Year of publication

Type of publication